U.S. Department of Justice
Library
Subscribe: Subscribe to email alerts  |  Subscribe to RSS
Recently found corrections resources available online.
New in the Library
Aiming to Reduce Time-In-Cell: Reports from Correctional Systems on the Numbers of Prisoners in Restricted Housing and on the Potential of Policy Changes to Bring About Reforms
Posted: 2 days ago
(2016) This report "provides the only current, comprehensive data on the use of restricted housing, in which individuals are held in their cells for 22 hours or more each day, and for 15 continuous days or more at a time. The Report also documents efforts across the country to reduce the number of people in restricted housing and to reform the conditions in which isolated prisoners are held in order to improve safety for prisoners, staff, and communities at large" (p. 1).
New in the Library
Restrictive Housing: Roadmap to Reform [Internet Broadcast]
Posted: 1 week ago
(2016) “Do we really think it makes sense to lock so many people alone in tiny cells for 23 hours a day for months, sometime for years at a time? That is not going to make us safer. It’s not going to make us stronger. If those individuals are ultimately released, how are they ever going to adapt? It’s not smart.” – President Barack Obama, NAACP National Convention speech, July 14, 2015. The use of Restrictive Housing poses some of the most challenging questions facing corrections professionals: How should correctional agencies manage their most violent and disruptive inmates? How can they best protect their most vulnerable and victimized ones? And what is the safest and most humane way to do so? The Department of Justice (DOJ) and the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) define “restrictive housing” as a form of housing that involves three basic elements: removal from the general inmate population, whether voluntary or involuntary; placement in a locked room or cell, whether alone or with another inmate; and inability to leave the room or cell for the vast majority of the day, typically 22 hours or more. Restrictive housing takes many forms, and an inmate’s experience can vary considerably depending on certain external factors, such as length of stay, conditions of confinement, and degree of social isolation, as well as factors specific to each inmate, such as age and psychological resiliency. This training broadcast will: examine restrictive housing practices in your agency and compare and contrast those with the DOJ Guiding Principles; explore the Guiding Principles and implications for restrictive housing practice and conditions of confinement; use interactive activities and action planning to determine strategies for your agency to safely reduce the use of restrictive housing in your agency; and share promising practices and recommendations for the implementation of the Guiding Principles. This broadcast will answer the following questions: How should prisons and other correctional facilities manage their most violent and dangerous inmates? How can they best protect their most vulnerable and victimized inmates? What is the safest and most humane way to do so? Why did the Department of Justice create a set of Guiding Principles on the effective use of Restrictive Housing? How can we use the DOJ Guiding Principles to self-evaluate our current agency practice?
New in the Library
More Than Emptying Beds: A Systems Approach to Segregation Reform
Posted: 5 weeks ago
(2016) "Segregation has been and will continue to be a tool that is necessary to manage legitimate safety concerns. Reforms in the use of this practice will only be successful if the safety of inmates and staff is maintained or improved in the process. To impact the health and well-being of people under correctional control, reducing the use of segregation on its own by only “emptying beds” is of limited value. To make an impactful change, a systems approach to this complex issue is essential. This policy brief shares lessons from the systems approach to reform undertaken by the Washington Department of Corrections (WADOC) that began more than a decade ago and continues to the present day" (p. 3-4).
New in the Library
HOPE II: A Followup Evaluation of Hawai'i’s HOPE Probation
Posted: 5 weeks ago
(2016) "Hawai'i’s Opportunity Probation with Enforcement (HOPE) Hawai'i’s Opportunity Probation with Enforcement probation relies on a regimen of regular, random drug testing tied to swift and certain, but modest, sanctions to motivate probationer compliance. In two 2007 studies in Hawai'i, a comparison-group quasi-experiment and a randomized controlled trial, HOPE was demonstrated to improve compliance with terms of probation at 12-month followup, with large reductions in drug use, recidivism, and overall incarceration for offenders assigned to the program … This study extends the original HOPE evaluations to an almost ten-year followup, addressing whether the improvements in criminal-justice outcomes observed during the active HOPE intervention persist after the term of probation. The study also documents changes in HOPE practices and ongoing implementation fidelity to the model … HOPE probationers performed better than those supervised under routine supervision. They were less likely to be revoked and returned to prison" (p. 2-3).
New in the Library
Live Webinar Event for the Release of NIC Publication "Veterans Treatment Courts: A Second Chance for Vets Who Have Lost Their Way [Webinar]
Posted: 6 weeks ago
(2016) Sentencing alternatives for veterans? There are dozens of specialized courts across the country that employ therapeutic programs to help keep veterans out of jail. "Veterans Treatment Courts: A Second Chance for Vets Who Have Lost Their Way" is a new publication that tells the story of these veterans and the judges, veterans advocates, and treatment professionals who are fighting to ensure a second chance for vets who find themselves caught up in the criminal justice system. The publication was produced in partnership by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC), a division of the Federal Bureau of Prisons, and the Veterans Health Council of Vietnam Veterans of America (VVA). The report is based on a series of interviews and personal observations of the judges, veterans, and veterans advocates who have been intimately involved in the founding and operation of veterans treatment courts. In this book, they relay how veterans treatment courts are "the right thing to do" for justice-involved veterans who commit certain crimes associated with the lingering legacy of their wartime experiences. Court staff and graduates of veterans treatment court programs describe, in often exquisite detail, what their roles are and how they have come to embrace the concept that these courts, which use a carrot-and-stick approach to rehabilitate rather than overtly punish veteran defendants, represent what one veteran in Buffalo, New York, a key player in the creation of the first of these courts in the nation, has called "the most profound change in the attitude of our criminal justice system towards veterans in the history of this country." Objectives of this webinar are: Introduce NIC's new publication "Veterans Treatment Courts: A Second Chance for Vets Who Have Lost Their Way" by Bernard Edelman, Deputy Director for Policy and Government Affairs, VVA, and consultant Dr. Tom Berger, Executive Director of VVA's Veterans Health Council; Describe the inception of veteran's treatment courts and their focus; Highlight successes and challenges of veteran's treatment courts; and Hear a veteran's personal story of the impact of veteran's treatment court on their life.
New in the Library
Losing Time: Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease Behind Bars [Webinar]
Posted: 6 weeks ago
(2016) Dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, is difficult to detect in a population often afflicted with other mental illnesses and maladaptive social behaviors. During this interactive webinar we will explore how symptoms and behaviors can be misconstrued and identify environmental risk factors that can contribute to costly accidents and injury for inmates with dementia. We will also take an in-depth look at the Gold Coat program based at the California Men's Colony State Prison in San Luis Obispo. This model consists of healthy inmates specially trained to care for those with dementia and other cognitive impairments, who are designated by the gold smocks they wear. The experiences of former Gold Coats will reveal a working rehabilitative program, a true model of reform that can provide skills for meaningful employment while caring for those who cannot help themselves. Every facility is different with unique needs. During the webinar, we will provide a foundation for developing a self-contained model to meet the needs of cognitively impaired inmates while healthy inmates gain valuable, marketable skills. Utilizing images, narratives and interactive exercises, panelists will explore the challenges of aging in prison with a focus on dementia care. Focus areas include: What Happens to the Brain When Dementia / Alzheimer's Strikes; 10 Warning Signs; Effective Communication Strategies; Activities of Daily Living (ADLs); Alternative Environmental Programming; and Building a Successful Dementia Program. At the conclusion of the webinar, participants will be able to: Paraphrase their own working knowledge of dementia, in particular Alzheimer's Disease; Describe how symptoms and behaviors can be misconstrued as maladaptive behavior; Identify environmental risk factors that can contribute to costly accidents and injury for inmates with dementia; and Give examples of tools to develop a method to reduce risk factors, promote effective programming and provide cost effective care.
New in the Library
HOPE Probation: Hawaii's Opportunity Probation with Enforcement [Webinar]
Posted: 6 weeks ago
(2016) The Community Corrections Collaborative Network (CCCN) hosted a live webinar event with our federal partners and national and local experts to highlight Hawaii’s Opportunity Probation with Enforcement (HOPE), a collaborative strategy among the court, probation, prosecutors, defense, law enforcement and community treatment providers to effect positive behavioral changes in probationers. HOPE was first conceived of by Judge Steven S. Alm of the O’ahu First Circuit and began as a pilot program in 2004. The HOPE strategy targets higher risk/higher needs offenders, utilizing swift, certain, consistent, and proportionate consequences for non-compliance with probation conditions while maintaining a working alliance with the offender by both the probation officer and the judge. Within the framework of the National Institute of Corrections’ eight evidence-based principles for recidivism reduction, HOPE assists offenders in the change process in a caring and supportive environment to help probationers succeed on probation and in life. While seemingly a simple theoretical model, HOPE is hard to do, and requires shared leadership within the criminal justice system. Research has shown that the HOPE strategy, when done with fidelity, can be highly successful and is inspiring like efforts in thirty-one states across the country. The CCCN believes that individual jurisdictions can adopt the swift and certain philosophy while modifying it to fit the needs and resources available in local communities. Our network is committed to identifying promising and innovative practices and promoting the use of evidence-based practices. Objectives for the Webinar: Showcase the innovative HOPE Program and how it can be replicated stateside; Discuss HOPE's innovative programmatic design, implementation and evaluation characteristics including HOPE's collaboration and systems approach (Court/Probation/Law Enforcement/Community Treatment Providers working together for a common goal), buy-in from staff/engagement/inclusion/supporting each other, matching probationers to the right services instead of one-size fits all, succession planning and sustainability build to success, and research, randomized control trials, and high level scientific design proving the effectiveness of the program; and engage the criminal justice system in a live discussion about the HOPE Program, resources for the field, how to access funding through federal resources, ideas for replication of similar approaches, and how to motivate our leaders to want to do more.
New in the Library
National Institute of Corrections' Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Training Courses
Posted: 7 weeks ago
(2016) NIC offers the PREA courses at the NIC Learn Center here: https://nic.learn.com The Learn Center is a full LMS, Learning Management System that will allow individuals to: create an account; start, stop a course and return to where they left off; and create and print a certificate upon successful completion of a course. The purpose of offering these courses on a DVD is to accommodate an institution that does not have access to the Internet and therefore needs another method of providing the PREA courses to their staff. When possible, please use the Learn Center for a better experience. These eight courses will assist agencies and staff in meeting the requirements of Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA). Courses contained on this data DVD are: "Audit Process and Instrument Overview" which will assist agencies in meeting the requirements of PREA Section 115.93; "Behavioral Health Care for Sexual Assault Victims in a Confinement Setting" which will assist agencies in meeting the requirements of PREA standard 115.35; "Communicating Effectively and Professionally with LGBTI Offenders" which will provide strategies for communicating respectfully with all adult offenders, with a specific focus on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) offenders; "Coordinators' Roles and Responsibilities" which will provide agency PREA Coordinators with an overview of the basic role and responsibilities of their position; "Investigating Sexual Abuse in a Confinement Setting" which will assist agencies in meeting the requirements of PREA Section 115.34; "Medical Health Care for Sexual Assault Victims in a Confinement Setting" which will assist agencies in meeting the requirements of PREA Section 115.35; "PREA: Preventing and Addressing Sexual Abuse in Tribal Detention Facilities" which provides guidelines and practices that will help in preventing and addressing sexual abuse in your tribal detention facility; and "Your Role Responding to Sexual Assault" which is designed to enhance correctional professionals’ skills in responding to incidents and allegations of sexual abuse.
New in the Library
Reconnecting Justice: Pathways to Effective Reentry though Education and Training
Posted: 8 weeks ago
(2016) "Incarcerated individuals are disproportionately people of color as well as adults with low educational attainment. More than 650,000 ex-offenders are released from prison each year and recent research shows that two-thirds of those prisoners will be rearrested within three years of release. However, research also shows that access to correctional education can significantly reduce recidivism … it’s essential to invest in robust education and training opportunities for incarcerated people and to connect them to continued education and employment opportunities once they rejoin society. Providing these opportunities is cost-effective for states and has significant community and economic benefits. For individuals and families, coupling education and employment with reduced collateral and systemic barriers leads to economic self-sufficiency and improved life outcomes. CLASP’s forum examines promising policy options as well as lessons from state and federal initiatives." In addition to the forum video, agenda, and speaker biographies, this webpage provides access to the report "From Incarceration to Reentry: A Look at Trends, Gaps, and Opportunities in Correctional Education and Training" by Wayne Taliaferro, Duy Pham, and Anna Cielinski.
New in the Library
NIC Information Center Dispatch Archive
Posted: 8 weeks ago
(2016) This online newsletter is presented by the National Institute of Corrections Information Center. The Dispatch provides important information to the corrections field. Sections of this publication include: Spotlight—one-on-one Q&A from NIC staff; NIC Divisions—links to the Academy, Community Services, Jails, and Prisons Divisions; New in the Library—key reports and articles for correctional professionals; Feature of the Month—an extended look at an issue that impacts correctional agencies; Resources—links to further information about the Feature; About NIC--an overview of NIC by Director Jim Cosby; and Upcoming NIC Training Events.
Browse the Library
News
Subscribe: Subscribe to RSS feed  | Subscribe to RSS
Important corrections news and announcements.
Corrections News
See Us There! NIC at ACA in San Antonio
Posted: 1 day ago
Visit the NIC exhibit booth #111 and sponsored workshops at the American Correctional Association Winter Conference in San Antonio, January 20-24, 2017. A-2F Changing Behavior With Functional Analysis and Individualized Behavior Management Plans (IBMPs) Every interaction we have with offenders has the potential to modify behavior. Our response, or lack thereof, has the potential to either increase, maintain or decrease the frequency of that behavior in the future. In corrections, we are routinely asked to address problematic offender behaviors. Many attempts at behavior change are doomed from the start because of lack of input from front-line staff; limited understanding of behavioral principles; a lack of consistency; an absence of communication across disciplines, shifts and institutions; a failure to consider the function(s) of the behavior(s); and an emphasis placed on the benefit of short-term gains (at the expense of long-term benefits). This session introduces a process for
Corrections News
Farewell Message from NIC Director Jim Cosby
Posted: 1 day ago
MESSAGE FROM THE DIRECTOR January 17, 2017 Dear Colleagues, As my term serving as Director of the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) comes to an end, I wanted to send this message to the thousands of correctional and criminal justice practitioners across America. During my tenure, our focus at NIC has been to provide leadership, training, and technical assistance to the field of corrections, covering a wide array of topics. For example: NIC has contributed to driving down unnecessary incarceration while maintaining public safety in our country. Efforts to enhance correctional and criminal justice practice are effective and are making a difference in the lives of correctional and criminal justice staff as well as justice involved individuals every day. Our staff wellness efforts have drawn necessary attention to the everyday stressors in this profession and provided guidance for improving overall health of correctional staff. We have provided the opportunity to touc
Corrections News
NIC Training: Justice Involved Women: Developing an Agency-Wide Approach
Posted: 2 days ago
In April, NIC is offering a research based, gender-informed (women) training designed for making systemic changes to improve management of justice involved women. The program is delivered in three sequential phases on line learning, face-to-face training and follow up coaching. Through blended learning delivery this 36-hour program leads participant teams through strategic planning to develop an agency plan that provides coordination and direction to manage women offenders effectively. The plan will guide development of agency policies and procedures to ensure that responsive and effective services are provided to meet the supervision and programming needs of justice involved women. The curriculum is designed to assist agencies to implement planned change. Apply by: Feb. 21, 2017 Dates for the face-to face training: Apr. 18, 2017- Apr. 20, 2017 For more Information and to Apply -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Corrections News
In the News: New Center Allows Overnight Visits for Female Inmates, Their Children
Posted: 2 days ago
Posted in the Memphis Flyer, this article describes a new program for overnight visitation at the West Tennessee Women s Therapeutic Residential Center. The program is designed to maintain positive ties between female inmates and their families during incarceration. The facility provides a common room, kitchenette, living area, and bedrooms for the inmate and child. Access the full article ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ This announcement is available at NIC s Gender-Responsive News for Women and Girls. Feel free to forward to friends and colleagues. Subscribe to the newsletter at http://nicic.gov/go/subscribe. For additional resources on Justice-Involved Women go to NIC s Women Offenders.
Corrections News
Cooperative Agreement: Inmate Behavior Management Initiative Enhancement
Posted: 1 week ago
See Questions and Answers below: The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is seeking applications for funding under the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 Inmate Behavior Management Initiative Enhancement. This program furthers NIC s mission by building capacity of state and local correctional agencies to develop and establish effective inmate management strategies. Objectives: Promote an operational philosophy that recognizes the need to effectively manage inmate behavior by direct supervision or increased supervision by staff (IBM) Review and revise the current Direct Supervision and IBM curricula including modification for a comparable prisons version of each curriculum Develop a training-for-trainers curriculum on IBM to include comparable versions for both jails and prison Pilot all revised, modified, and newly developed curricula DEADLINE: Applications must be received before midnight (ET) on March 2, 2017. Download the full solicitation Learn more about NIC s Cooperativ
Corrections News
Thinking for a Change in Seneca County Jail
Posted: 2 weeks ago
In October of last year, Seneca County started their first T4C group. The staff at the facility see the same people over and over again. Seneca county officials implemented the program to address this issue. They believe it will improve public safety and reentry outcomes. During intake, new inmates are given a test to determine their risk of reoffending. Those who rate medium to high-risk are eligible for the voluntary program. T4C is a 25 lesson intensive program that addresses criminal thinking. It incorporates research from cognitive restructuring theory, social skills development, and the learning and use of problem solving skills. T4C is an integrated cognitive behavioral change program authored by Jack Bush, Ph.D., Barry Glick, Ph.D., and Juliana Taymans, Ph.D., under a cooperative agreement with the National Institute of Corrections (NIC). Read more about what Seneca County is doing: here Find more information about Thinking for a Change 4.0: here
Corrections News
Cooperative Agreement: Staffing Analysis Manual for Corrections and Technical Assistance
Posted: 2 weeks ago
The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is seeking applications for funding under the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 Staffing Analysis Manual for Corrections and Technical Assistance. This program furthers NIC s mission by building the capacity of federal, state, local, and tribal correctional agencies to independently evaluate and assess staffing requirements, perform staffing calculations, develop a staffing plan, produce a comprehensive staffing report, and monitor and evaluate the implementation of recommendations from the staffing analysis. Program-Specific Information NIC s Staffing analysis training has been conducted separately by both the prisons and jails divisions using separate curricula in classroom setting comprised of participants from multiple facilities or agencies. Materials for the four-day Prison Staffing Analysis Training Program include Prison Staffing Analysis: A Training Manual, facilitator guide with field exercise and presentation guidelines appendix, and a
Corrections News
Improving Understanding of and Responsiveness to Gang-Involved Girls
Posted: 3 weeks ago
This National Gang Center Newsletter focuses on gang-involved girls, female delinquency and human trafficking. The main article about understanding and responding to gang-involved girls summarizes key findings from a National Council on Crime and Delinquency (NCCD) study. The NCCD study involved interviews with gang-involved girls and key stakeholders and provided several recommendations for service providers and others who want to help gang-involved girls. Recommendations from the study findings: Place Intersectionality at the Forefront - Services should consider the intersectional linkages among participants races/ethnicities, genders, classes, citizenship status, gender identities, sexual orientations, and other factors. This can include understanding and acknowledging how these defining characteristics influence the choices, viewpoints, and experiences of young women involved in gangs. Understand Girls Entrenched Lives - Many interview participants were entrenched in l
Corrections News
Updated: Cooperative Agreement - Incident Command System for Corrections: Training for Trainers
Posted: 4 weeks ago
Questions and Answers below: The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is seeking applications for funding under the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017 Incident Command System for Corrections (ICSC): Training for Trainers (T4T). This program furthers NIC s mission by building the capacity of federal, state, local, and tribal correctional agencies to develop, enhance, and expand ICSC T4T efforts. Overview of Program: This program will develop, enhance, and expand ICSC T4T training efforts for federal, state, local, and tribal correctional agencies. ICSC addresses critical correctional issues while teaching Incident Command and also creates a pathway that ensures that the correctional agency is prepared to transition into NIMS as an incident moves beyond the secure perimeter. Through this cooperative agreement, NIC seeks to expand its delivery of incident command services to include local confinement facilities (jails). The existing 4-day, 32-hour Incident Command System for Corrections T
Corrections News
WCCW Sends Quilts, Infant Clothes to Incarcerated Mothers in Thailand
Posted: 4 weeks ago
This article from the Washington State DOC Newsroom conveys the impact a small group of inmates are having on incarcerated women in Thailand. The Sisters of Charity, a group of approximately 15 inmates from the Washington Corrections Center for Women (WCCW) in Gig Harbor, make items for social welfare organizations and recently sent handmade quilts and decorated onesies to mothers inside Thailand prisons. When they (Thailand inmates) find out the gifts are made by women at WCCW, their eyes and hearts light up, and they re filled with appreciation, new inspiration and hope, said Laurie Dawson, a member of the WCCW Local Family Council. The Sisters of Charity s efforts are in support of the Bangkok Rules, a minimum standard of treatment for female inmates that supplements guidelines set forth by the United Nations. Access the full article ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ This announcement is available
Older News
Training
Subscribe: Subscribe to RSS  | Subscribe this calendar (iCal)  | View calendar of events  
Upcoming training, broadcasts, and e-learning opportunities.
Training Opportunity
National Sheriffs' Institute
Register Before: July 02, 2017
(Begins September 18, 2017) The National Sheriffs' Institute (NSI), sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) and the National Sheriffs' Association (NSA), is designed to enhance your leadership skills as you take on the challenges of your first term as sheriff. It is the only executive leadership program designed specifically for first-term sheriffs. It was first developed and delivered in the early 1970s and has changed over the years to meet the evolving needs of first-term sheriffs. The program is held in Aurora, Colorado.
Training Opportunity
Orientation for New Pretrial Executives
Register Before: June 15, 2017
(Begins August 07, 2017) Extensive training that enhances the effectiveness of pretrial executives in maintaining and capitalizing existing services.
Training Opportunity
Direct Supervision T4T
Register Before: May 19, 2017
(Begins July 31, 2017) This training consists of two recently developed programs by the National Institute of Corrections’ Jails Division: • Making Direct Supervision Work: The Role of the Housing-Unit Officer • Making Direct Supervision Work: The Role of the First-Line Supervisor The programs are designed for agencies planning to move from a traditional jail into a new direct supervision jail. However, they also can be used to train new and veteran staff in direct supervision jails currently operating under the direct supervision philosophy.
Training Opportunity
Jail Public Information Officers’ Network Overview
Register Before: May 15, 2017
(Begins June 07, 2017) Public Information Officers (PIO) play a vital role in local jails. The public’s perception/misperception of jail operations can influence public safety, funding, elections and numerous other factors. Responding to media inquiries regarding crisis situations is just one of the many roles of the PIO. Building a positive rapport with the media, taking control of your message, and conveying your mission are priority tasks for a PIO.
Training Opportunity
Orientation for Parole Board Members
Register Before: April 28, 2017
(Begins May 31, 2017) This 40-hour program will help parole board members gain knowledge and skills in the area of informed decision making through evidence-based principles and practices for determining offender risk and motivation for change. It will also help them evaluate the efficacy of release plans. The program emphasizes the critical role of collaboration and partnerships with stakeholders to increase offender success and public safety. The program uses a peer interaction process. Mandatory course components include online sessions, face-to-face training, and independent work.
Training Opportunity
Orientation for Parole Board Members
Register Before: April 28, 2017
(Begins July 25, 2017) This 40-hour program will help parole board members gain knowledge and skills in the area of informed decision making through evidence-based principles and practices for determining offender risk and motivation for change. It will also help them evaluate the efficacy of release plans. The program emphasizes the critical role of collaboration and partnerships with stakeholders to increase offender success and public safety. The program uses a peer interaction process. Mandatory course components include online sessions, face-to-face training, and independent work.
Training Opportunity
Orientation for Parole Board Chairs
Register Before: April 28, 2017
(Begins September 19, 2017) Parole board chairs, whether appointed by their governor, elected by their peers, or rotated into their role from their seat on the parole board, are in an influential position to lead efforts to improve and reform the transition and reentry system, as well as enhance their board’s capacity to use evidence-based principles in effective offender management. Being an effective chair requires clearly defined roles and strategies to ensure that informed decisions are made relative to the release and return of offenders.
Training Opportunity
Chief Jail Inspector Network
Register Before: April 24, 2017
(Begins July 18, 2017) This two-day program is designed to build the knowledge and skills of new detention facility inspectors in their core duties of inspecting, consultation, and technical assistance.
Training Opportunity
Inmate Behavior Management
Register Before: April 21, 2017
(Begins July 17, 2017) Students participate in the Inmate Behavior Management course in teams of three. The jail administrator, the security staff manager, and the manager of the inmate classification system all work together to develop a plan that meets the needs of their own facility.
Training Opportunity
Planning and Implementing Effective Mental Health Services in Jails
Register Before: April 07, 2017
(Begins June 13, 2017) Planning and Implementing Effective Mental Health Services in Jails
Full Training Catalog