U.S. Department of Justice
Library
Subscribe: Subscribe to email alerts  |  Subscribe to RSS
Recently found corrections resources available online.
New in the Library
By the Numbers: Parole Release and Revocation Across 50 States
Posted: 1 day ago
(2016) "Parole decision-making functions as a crucial mechanism channeling people in and out of prison. This report combines multiple data sources and, for the first time, provides an overview of the movements between prison and parole for each state, focusing on the decision points of parole release and parole revocation. This information allows for a comprehensive picture of each state, both as a snapshot and longitudinally. For each state, information is presented on prison and parole rates over time, the percentage of prison admissions that are due to people on conditional release, the percentage of hearings by the parole board that result in parole being granted, the rate of re-incarceration for parolees, and the percentage of parolees who exit parole due to an incarceration versus a successful completion of supervision" (website).
New in the Library
Veterans Treatment Courts: A Second Chance for Vets Who Have Lost Their Way
Posted: 1 week ago
(2016) "This white paper is based on a series of interviews, buttressed by personal observations, of key players in half a dozen jurisdictions where Veterans Treatment Courts have been operating with marked success. Neither graphs nor charts nor a plethora of statistics are employed to illustrate the protocols and practices of these therapeutic courts. Instead, proponents and practitioners intimately involved in the founding and operation of these courts relate how they are “the right thing to do” for combat veterans who commit certain crimes that are associated with the lingering legacy of their wartime experiences. They describe, in often exquisite detail, what their roles are and how they have come to embrace the concept that these courts, which use a carrot-and-stick approach to rehabilitate rather than overtly punish veteran defendants, represent what one of the individuals responsible for the introduction of the first of these diversionary courts has called “the most profound change in the attitude of our criminal justice system towards veterans in the history of this country” (p. iii). This publication is comprised of fifteen chapters: so, you're (thinking of) starting a veterans treatment court; nobody returns from a combat zone unaffected, unscathed, unchanged; PTSD by any other name … can still wreck lives; a brief history of veterans treatment courts; Judge Robert Russell—"godfather" of the veterans treatment court movement; Buffalo Veterans Court—they're number one; the "top ten" components of a veterans treatment court; the mentor program—helping vets through the labyrinth; in the beginning—first set up your game plan; role of the players; Judge Marc Carter—what justice is; elements of the process; Michelle Slaterry—maven for research; success stories—in their own words; and questions and answers.
New in the Library
Improving Responses to People with Mental Illnesses at the Pretrial Stage: Essential Elements
Posted: 2 weeks ago
(2015) "This report introduces essential elements for responding to people with mental illnesses at the pretrial stage, including decisions about pretrial release and diversion. These elements encourage data collection not only to help individual communities, but also for future researchers who are dedicated to these important questions."
New in the Library
First-Episode Incarceration: Creating a Recovery-Informed Framework for Integrated Mental Health and Criminal Justice Responses
Posted: 2 weeks ago
(2016) "This report, modeled on promising approaches in the mental health field to people experiencing a first episode of psychosis, outlines a new integrated framework that encourages the mental health and criminal justice fields to collaborate on developing programs based on early intervention, an understanding of the social determinants that underlie ill health and criminal justice involvement, and recovery-oriented treatment."
New in the Library
No News Is NOT Good News: The Role of PIOs in Jails [Internet Broadcast]
Posted: 3 weeks ago
(2016) Public Information Officers (PIOs) play a vital role in the local jail. The public’s perception and/or misperception of jail operations can influence public safety, funding, elections, and numerous other factors. Responding to media inquiries regarding crisis situations is just one of the many roles of the PIO. Building positive rapport with the media, telling your story, engaging the community and conveying your mission are priority tasks for a PIO. Topics discussed during this broadcast include: Importance of a proactive community-minded approach to communicating your mission, vision and values; Characteristics of effective PIOs in contemporary media markets; Strategies for being the active voice of your jail and telling your story by engaging the media; Approaches for engaging the community with your jail’s mission; Opportunities for promoting a healthy work / life balance for PIOs; How you can build positive relationships and create rapport with your local media. Presenters will also share recommendations and resources. This broadcast answers the following questions: Why is a comprehensive, proactive communication strategy necessary for jails? What are characteristics of an effective PIO in contemporary media markets? How do you build positive relationships and create rapport with your local media? How do you address the media’s needs and speak their language? How do you successfully pitch positive stories to the media? How do you build equity with your community so that you are not defined by crises or negative events? What is the importance of understanding your community’s demographics and values? What are some tools and strategies for engaging and connecting directly with your community? How do you effectively convey your message to the community? What steps can you take to promote a healthy work/life balance for PIOs? How can you find additional resources and ideas for enhancing your jail’s comprehensive communication strategy? What are the advantages to working with your community proactively to inform, educate, and gain support for your jail? What are the benefits of actively engaging the media in telling your stories? How do you leverage data to support your agency’s message? How can your agency use social media to promote your mission?
New in the Library
Reducing Recidivism in Massachusetts with a Comprehensive Strategy
Posted: 4 weeks ago
(2016) "This policy brief offers fodder for the state’s Justice Reinvestment leaders as they contemplate the changes necessary to increase the system’s focus on recidivism reduction and achieve results" (p. 2). Sections of this brief cover: key findings; the high cost of recidivism in Massachusetts-- incentive to reform, post-release supervision, step downs, and sentence length; evidence-based reentry strategies—post-release supervision, transitional housing, employment services, substance abuse and mental health, and multiservice reentry; collateral sanctions and criminal records in Massachusetts; how much reentry programs can reduce recidivism; conditions of confinement and recidivism risk; state reentry efforts—comprehensive reentry models (in Minnesota, Michigan, and Maryland), and funding reentry initiatives (justice reinvestment in Arkansas, Hawaii, South Dakota, and pay-for-success financing—California, Massachusetts, New York, and Oklahoma); justice reinvestment and effective supervision; and a five-part reentry plan for reducing recidivism in Massachusetts.
New in the Library
What Works? Short-Term, In-Custody Treatment Programs
Posted: 7 weeks ago
(2014) "Assessing the effectiveness of in-custody treatment programs is essential in the correctional system to appropriately allocate resources and reduce offender recidivism rates. With California passing AB 109, “2011 Public Safety Realignment”, it becomes imperative to understand the characteristics and principles of effective rehabilitation programing. Treatment programs that follow the core principles of the Risk-Needs-Responsivity model are found to be effective and to significantly decrease recidivism rates … The main question is whether jail treatment programs can be effective given the short duration of most jail terms. The transitory population in jails makes it difficult to provide continuous and effective treatment, further indicating the importance of analyzing the effectiveness of short-term, in-custody treatment programs. The authors reviewed the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy, education and vocational programs, substance and alcohol abuse treatment, faith-based, and mental illness treatment programs" (p. 3). Sections following an executive summary cover: effectiveness of in-custody treatment programs-- risk-needs-responsivity (RNR) model, and characteristics and principles of effective treatment programs; cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT); educational and vocational programs; substance and alcohol abuse; faith-based programs; and mental illness.
New in the Library
Fines, Fees, and Bail: Payments in the Criminal Justice System That Disproportionately Impact the Poor
Posted: 7 weeks ago
(2015) "As the use of fixed monetary penalties has increased, many observers have raised concerns about the equity, legality and efficiency of these regressive payments. At the same time, meaningful reforms could increase equity without sacrificing deterrent impacts of these payments or the goal of supporting criminal justice operations … [This document examines] the use and impact of fines, fees and bail, and highlight[s] potential options for reform" (p. 2). Sections cover: what fines, fees, and bail are; fines and fees—rising criminal justice budgets have motivated growth in these, the use and size of fees have increased over time, fines and fees are regressive payments that disproportionately impact the poor, fines and fees impose large financial and human costs on poor offenders, collection of fines and fees is often inefficient, reforming fines and fees could potentially increase both equity and efficiency; and bail—the use and size of bail bonds has increased over time, leading to increased pretrial detention of defendants leading to increased pretrial detention of defendants, bail assignments are regressive, leading to pretrial detention of the poorest rather than the most dangerous defendants, pretrial detention of low risk offenders is costly to taxpayers and defendants, and a number of bail reform options could both increase fairness and reduce pretrial misconduct.
New in the Library
Selecting and Using Risk and Need Assessment
Posted: 7 weeks ago
(2015) "The purpose of this document is to provide Drug Court staff with a concise and current overview of important issues relating to offender risk assessment and to provide a list of recommended contemporary risk instruments. Numerous risk scales are currently used in the United States … to assess static risk factors and criminogenic needs (dynamic risk factors that are related to the client’s propensity for criminal behavior), of which substance abuse is but one. Almost all of these are applied to predict risk post-adjudication" (p. 1). This publication focuses on those recommended and promising risk and needs instruments best for drug courts. Sections of this document include: risk assessment-an overview for drug courts; advantages, limits, and usage or risk assessment approaches in contemporary practice; issues for drub courts to consider in selecting risk instruments; selection criteria and overview of risk assessment instruments; best practice guidelines for integrating risk and clinical measures; summary of recommended and promising risk and need assessment instruments; summary of recommended purpose-specific risk assessment instruments; ten principles for using risk assessment; description of recommended risk instruments—Correctional Offender Management Profiling for Alternative Sanctions (COMPAS), Level of Service-Case Management Inventory (LS/CMI), Post Conviction Risk Assessment (PCRA), the Ontario Domestic Assault Risk Assessment (ODARA), and the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide-Revised (VRAG-R); promising risk instruments—Ohio Risk Assessment System (ORAS)—Pretrial Assessment Tool (PAT) and Community Supervision TOOL (CST), and the Risk and Needs Triage (RANT).
New in the Library
Arts Infusion Initiative, 2010-15: Evaluation Report
Posted: 8 weeks ago
(2015) "In 2010, an ambitious model for social change emerged in Chicago that aimed to connect detained youth and those at risk for incarceration (“at-risk youth”) to rigorous and engaging arts instruction, infused with social and emotional learning goals. Dubbed the Arts Infusion Initiative, the Chicago Community Trust (“the Trust”) spearheaded and funded this five year, $2.5 million demonstration while earning cooperation from the local detention facility, public school system, community policing office, and community arts program leaders to integrate arts programming into youths’ school and after school environments. Since its launch, the Arts Infusion Initiative has served more than 2,000 youth at an average annual cost of $700 per teen, linking them to high performing arts instruction associated with significant increases in social and emotional learning. This report marks the first large-scale evaluation of the Arts Infusion Initiative which was designed to: (1) assess the degree to which the project, as an emergent model for social change, was achieving its intended purposes and (2) generate actionable information for promoting effective Arts Infusion practices while redirecting those that have been less effective" (p. 3). Six chapters comprise this evaluation: introduction; importance of the Arts Infusion Initiative; components of the Arts Infusion Initiative; evaluation methods; seven key findings; and recommendations for promising practices. Two of the key findings are: Arts Infusion youth participants had statistically significant improvements in their social and emotional learning skills; and Arts Infusion programs were successful in "exposing at-risk youth "to new skills and technologies, providing confidence building experiences that opened their minds to a positive future" (p. 5).
Browse the Library
News
Subscribe: Subscribe to RSS feed  | Subscribe to RSS
Important corrections news and announcements.
Corrections News
NIC’s Evidence-Based Decision Making (EBDM) is in the News
Posted: 4 days ago
Moran announces increased funding for pretrial services NIC s initiative EBDM is a strategic method of applying research-supported principles to justice system decisions. EBDM s goal is to build a framework across criminal justice agencies to protect public safety and to improve outcomes for the justice-involved. The initiative is now in Phase V. In this phase the selected sites--Indiana, Virginia, and Wisconsin--are creating state-level processes and strategies to align state and local officials and jurisdictions with one another and with the principles of EBDM. The impact of the EBDM program can be seen in jurisdictions across Virginia, where the governor s office will be adding $2 million in increased funding for community corrections and pretrial services. Brian Moran, state secretary for public health and homeland security stated, The increased funding is expected to help communities around the state explore alternatives to incarceration and implement risk assessments for r
Corrections News
Register Now - Losing Time: Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease Behind Bars
Posted: 1 week ago
Losing Time: Dementia and Alzheimer s Disease Behind Bars A webinar focusing on initiating awareness, recognizing symptomology and exploring recommendations for daily care of dementia, particularly Alzheimer s disease behind bars. Date: July 28, 2016 Time: Please note webinar start time/your time zone 9:00-10:00am PT / 10:00-11:00am MT/AZ/ 11:00am-12:00pm CT / 12:00pm-1:00pm ET Target Audience: Criminal justice professionals and organizations, community-based providers, and those interested in aging offender issues. Register Here https://nic.webex.com/nic/onstage/g.php?MTID=e91a2c62ff4caabfadf78905a9b2fdb9e Description Dementia, including Alzheimer s disease, is difficult to detect in a population often afflicted with other mental illnesses and maladaptive social behaviors. During this interactive webinar we will explore how symptoms and behaviors can be misconstrued and identify environmental risk factors that can contribute to costly accidents and injury for
Corrections News
From Incarcerated Mother to Community Role Model: Unique Parenting Program in Bexar County Credited with Inmate's Turnaround
Posted: 1 week ago
Michele Brown had a 30-year history of cocaine addiction and spent many years in and out of the criminal justice system for crimes associated with her habit. After completing a prison sentence, Brown completed something else: her bachelor s and master s degrees from Texas A M University. This Corrections Today article describes Brown s journey and the Bexar County Mothers and Their Children (MATCH) parenting program that helped make it successful. Highlights from the article: Bexar County was the first in the nation to implement MATCH, a parent-child contact visitation program for incarcerated mothers, more than 30 years ago. The objective of the MATCH program is to expose incarcerated mothers to as much life-changing information as possible. Through structured educational classes, parent-child contact visits and an e-book program, officials seek to transform the lives of incarcerated mothers so they can become role models their children can emulate. MATCH made headlines in Ma
Corrections News
RTI International hosts a panel: Mental Illness and Violent Events: Identifying, Managing and Reducing Risks
Posted: 1 week ago
May 26, 2016 12:30 2 p.m. EDT National Press Club, Washington, DC At this policy forum, a panel of stakeholder experts will draw from their research, policy and clinical expertise to shed light on the link between mental illness and violence. The forum will provide an opportunity to discuss the causes of violent behavior to help demystify the role of mental illness in violent events and clarify its scope. The panel will also recommend steps for moving from identifying those at risk of violence to effectively managing and reducing violence risk through evidence-based assessments, interventions and services, and policies. The panel includes: Duren Banks, Ph.D., senior research criminologist, RTI International Leslie Citrome, M.D., clinical professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, New York Medical College Sarah Desmarais, Ph.D., associate professor of psychology, North Carolina State University Josh Horwitz, J.D., executive director, Educational Fund to Stop Gun Violen
Corrections News
SAMHSA Webinar: Screening and Assessment of Co-occurring Disorders in the Justice System
Posted: 2 weeks ago
SAMHSA s GAINS Center is pleased to announce that registration is open for an upcoming webinar to address best practices in screening and assessment of co-occurring mental and substance use disorders in the justice system. Webinar Description: Roger H. Peters, PhD, of the University of South Florida, will review the recommendations and guidance from the new SAMHSA publication, Screening and Assessment of Co-occurring Disorders in the Justice System. In addition, Dr. Peters will provide participants with an understanding of issues in screening and assessment at each intercept along the Sequential Intercept Model, including specific guidance regarding trauma histories, trauma-related disorders, and treatment motivation. The webinar will be followed by discussion groups specific to the intercepts along the Sequential Intercept Model. Discussion groups provide participants an opportunity to converse with the presenter and ask targeted questions. Date/Time: Thursday, May 26, 2016
Corrections News
Q&A with NZ Harkness Fellow: her reflections on her time in the United States and with the National Institute of Corrections
Posted: 2 weeks ago
Aphra Green is this year s New Zealand Harkness Fellow. She has been in the US since February, looking at the key success factors for implementing evidence-based decision-making, with a focus on the pretrial decision point. New Zealand has recently established a similar program of work: Social Investment in the Criminal Justice System. During her three months at the National Institute of Corrections, Aphra worked closely with Lori Eville on her pretrial and Evidence-based Decision Making (EBDM) projects. Tell me about your background, and what led you to criminal justice policy? I have a law degree a Masters of Law in fact. I started my career in government, working in a policy role at the Ministry of Health. I then had a short stint in private legal practice, before completing a research fellowship with Otago University s Human Genome Research Project. Having been lucky enough to experience these three sectors early in my career, I made a deliberate choice to return to the pu
Corrections News
NRCJIW Jail Tip Sheets on Justice Involved Women
Posted: 2 weeks ago
Available from the National Resource Center on Justice Involved Women (NRCJIW), these Tip Sheets were created to facilitate the implementation of gender-informed approaches with women in jail settings. The tip sheets are intended to be used by correctional staff and treatment providers in their work with women. This series of eight tip sheets were developed in response to recommendations from participants at the Women in Jails Summit held in October, 2014. During the summit, jail practitioners asked for concise resources or tools that addressed their specific concerns regarding the management of women in jail settings and provided links to additional resources. Access each of the Tip Sheets: Jail Tip #1: Being Gender-Responsive and Trauma Informed is Just Good Correctional Practice, Anadora (Andie) Moss, The Moss Group Jail Tip #2: Take Steps to Be More Trauma Informed, Alyssa Benedict, CORE Associates Jail Tip #3: Review Discipline Policies and Practices, Alyssa Benedict, COR
Corrections News
Best Practice Toolkit for Working with Domestic Violence Survivors with Criminal Histories
Posted: 2 weeks ago
Published by the Michigan Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence, this Toolkit was developed to assist correctional professionals and those in the criminal legal system working with survivors of domestic violence. Corrections officers can avoid or minimize crisis within the institution by understanding the impact of trauma of people, and engaging in more trauma-informed behaviors. Defense attorneys need to understand domestic violence in order to effectively assist their clients, while probation officers need to understand how survivors ability to meet court requirements might be impacted by their abusers controlling behaviors. A primary goal of this toolkit is to provide information and referral sources to assist both criminal legal and domestic violence professionals in overcoming barriers to effectively working with domestic violence survivors charged with crimes. Sections of the Toolkit include: Overview of the Criminal Legal System How Domestic Violence May Impa
Corrections News
Context is Everything: NZ Harkness Fellow Reflects on the Critical Ingredients for Criminal Justice Reform as Learned Through Observing Evidence-Based Decision-Making in State and Local Jurisdictions
Posted: 2 weeks ago
The justice system is undoubtedly a complex system, and nowhere is this complexity more overwhelming than in the United States. To an outsider, it appears that the US justice system (if it can even be described as a single system) is groaning under the weight of overlapping and costly legislative and institutional changes that have mushroomed over the last century. Getting tough on crime has always been an easy vote-winner, and since the mid-1980s, the two main political parties in the US have been in the business of trying to out-tough each other with criminal justice and sentencing policies. The same has been true in NZ since the mid-1990s. Many of the changes made in the last 20-30 years in both countries have not adequately accounted for (or accurately predicted) their full costs to individuals and to society and have had the impact of exponentially increasing the number of people sentenced to, or held pretrial, in prison. As recession-hit budgets continue to shrink i
Corrections News
Register Today - NIC Publication Release webinar: "Veterans Treatment Courts: A Second Chance for Vets Who Have Lost Their Way"
Posted: 3 weeks ago
NIC Publication Release webinar: Veterans Treatment Courts: A Second Chance for Vets Who Have Lost Their Way Date: May 17, 2016 Time: Please note webinar start time/your time zone 10:00-11:30am PT / 11:00-12:30pm MT/AZ/ 12:00pm-1:30pm CT / 1:00pm-2:30pm ET Target Audience: Criminal Justice Professionals, Veterans Service Organizations / Community-Based Providers / Those interested in Justice Involved Veterans Issues Register Here https://nic.webex.com/nic/onstage/g.php?MTID=e03799ea7bb2d8e58f8370d36619bdd5d Description Sentencing alternatives for veterans? There are dozens of specialized courts across the country that employ therapeutic programs to help keep veterans out of jail. Veterans Treatment Courts: A Second Chance for Vets Who Have Lost Their Way is a new publication that tells the story of these veterans and the judges, veterans advocates, and treatment professionals who are fighting to ensure a second chance for vets who find themselves caught up in the cr
Older News
Training
Subscribe: Subscribe to RSS  | Subscribe this calendar (iCal)  | View calendar of events  
Upcoming training, broadcasts, and e-learning opportunities.
Training Opportunity
2016 Virtual Conference - Save the Date! November 9, 2016
Register Before: November 09, 2016
(Begins November 09, 2016) A virtual conference hosted by the National Institute of Corrections.
Training Opportunity
Chief Jail Inspectors' Network Meeting
Register Before: July 25, 2016
(Begins September 19, 2016) Please note that by applying for this meeting, you acknowledge that (1) you meet the eligibility requirements for the meeting, and (2) that your supervisor supports your application for, and attendance at, this meeting, if selected.
Training Opportunity
Large Jail Network Meeting
Register Before: July 08, 2016
(Begins September 07, 2016) The goals of the Large Jail Network are to explore issues facing jail systems from the perspectives of network members with administrative responsibility and to discuss strategies and resources for dealing successfully with these issues.
Training Opportunity
Correctional Industry Directors
Register Before: July 02, 2016
(Begins September 26, 2016) Correctional Industry Directors are called upon to provide dynamic and effective leadership which is a critical component in the success of any organization. Expanding leadership knowledge and enhancing leadership skills is the foundation for this training as it helps lay the groundwork for the complex work that must be done in this ever changing and challenging industry.
Training Opportunity
Orientation for Parole Board Chairs
Register Before: July 01, 2016
(Begins September 27, 2016) Parole board chairs, whether appointed by their governor, elected by their peers, or rotated into their role from their seat on the parole board, are in an influential position to lead efforts to improve and reform the transition and reentry system, as well as enhance their board’s capacity to use evidence-based principles in effective offender management. Being an effective chair requires clearly defined roles and strategies to ensure that informed decisions are made relative to the release and return of offenders.
Training Opportunity
Managing Restrictive Housing Populations
Register Before: July 01, 2016
(Begins September 12, 2016) This 40-hour training program focuses on the management of inmates in Restrictive Housing within the control and jurisdiction of departments of corrections throughout the country. 
Training Opportunity
Conducting Security Audits
Register Before: June 30, 2016
(Begins September 12, 2016) With NIC’s hands-on, onsite training, gain the experience of auditing out-of-state institutions of various security levels and missions. This 36-hour training program supplements classroom instruction in auditing protocol with tours of assigned facilities and real-world assignments that put newly trained participants in charge of the auditing process.
Training Opportunity
Orientation for New Pretrial Executives
Register Before: June 24, 2016
(Begins August 08, 2016) Extensive training that enhances the effectiveness of pretrial executives in maintaining and capitalizing existing services.
Training Opportunity
Offender Employment Retention Specialist (OERS) Trainings
Register Before: June 24, 2016
(Begins August 22, 2016) Offender Employment Retention Specialist Trainings. Research suggests that a history of unstable employment and low personal, educational, and vocational achievement help predict continued criminal involvement for an offender. Any effort to help offenders maintain their connection to the workforce warrants the implementation of innovative approaches to address the behavioral health issues of those classified as being at high risk for job loss.
Training Opportunity
Corrections Stress: Peaks and Valleys
Register Before: June 22, 2016
(Begins June 22, 2016) A live-streaming internet broadcast on the impact of operational stress and traumatic experiences on corrections professionals.
Full Training Catalog
[+] feedback