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Recently found corrections resources available online.
New in the Library
Using a Prevention, Trauma-Informed Framework when Implementing PREA
Posted: 3 days ago
(2015) "This video training series was designed to provide an important foundation for understanding trauma, the implications of trauma on the behaviors of inmates while in confinement, and how correctional administrators and practitioners can use this information to support successful PREA implementation and ultimately provide a safer environment for inmates and staff … Through considering the role that past and present trauma plays in building safe – and particularly sexually safe – environments, correctional administrators and staff training directors can support staff in efforts to more fully meet a facility’s mission and make everyone safer … the material contained in this video series will provide an opportunity for staff in confinement facilities to learn and be thoughtful about the benefits of a trauma-informed approach in correctional settings. " (p. 2). This training program contains five models and one documentary. Module One—An introduction to the Series. Using a Prevention, Trauma-Informed Framework when Implementing PREA (7 minutes): Andie Moss introduces you to need for understanding the role of trauma in implementing PREA. Module Two--What Is It Important To Understand Trauma When Implementing PREA? (15 minutes): Dr. Joan Gillece, a pioneer in implementing a trauma-informed approach, will explain what trauma is and how it influences PREA implementation. Module Three--Understanding the Neurobiological Effects of Trauma When implementing PREA (12 minutes): the neurobiological impact of trauma is explained by Dr. Brian Sims. Module Four--Implementing PREA Standards with a Trauma Focus (26 minutes): A panel of clinicians and practitioners from the Dorchester County Detention Center on Maryland’s Eastern, hosted by Andie Moss, provides examples on how to implement the PREA standards "through a trauma-informed lens in adult confinement settings … [these concepts are easily transferable to juvenile facilities". Module Five--Practical Solutions to Challenging Situations (10 minutes): The implementation of a trauma-informed approach in a jail is discussed by Alisha Salisbury, Warden Steve Mills, and PREA officer and investigator Lt. Robert Fitzgerald from the Dorchester County Detention Center. This "module will provide some creative examples for policymakers and practitioners to consider as they begin or continue to implement a trauma-informed approach". Healing Neen: Trauma and Recovery (25 minutes): this film shows how one woman benefited from trauma-informed care that helped her to take a journey from trauma, through the criminal justice system, to healing.
New in the Library
Deaf Inmates: Communication Strategies and Legal Considerations
Posted: 5 days ago
(2015) "In recent years, there has been a marked increase in the number of lawsuits brought against law enforcement agencies, departments of correction, private prison companies and reentry service providers on behalf of deaf and hard-of-hearing individuals. Entities that fail to provide equal communication access for deaf individuals frequently find themselves on the losing end of costly litigation, with judges finding violations of federal disability rights laws in the U.S. Constitution … As a result of increased transparency, criminal justice and corrections professionals across the nation are scrambling to create and implement policies to address the needs of this historically underserved and misunderstood population. However, although well-intentioned, these policies frequently do not resolve even the most basic concerns related to working with deaf individuals … This article tackles some of the commonly held misconceptions about deaf and hard-of-hearing people, and it concludes by providing recommendations to support criminal justice and corrections professionals’ efforts to prevent discrimination against and abuse of deaf and hard-of-hearing people in correctional settings. Armed with this knowledge, agencies of all sizes can limit or avoid liability exposure by taking proactive steps to ensure all deaf people have equal access to programs, services and activities pursuant to federal disability rights laws" (p. 44). Sections of this article include: defining "deaf"; background- "prison within a prison"; Case study by HEARD (Helping Educate to Advance Equal Rights of the Deaf); ten myths and misconceptions; summary of the law—Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act, and Title II of Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA); recommendations; and conclusion.
New in the Library
A Cycle of Incarceration: Prison, Debt, and Bail Practices [Webinar]
Posted: 5 days ago
(2015) "Building on the Administration¹s commitment to criminal justice reform, the convening will bring together federal officials, state legislators and judges, advocates and academics to discuss criminal justice system practices that too often contribute to the cycle of poverty and create significant barriers to reentry. Co-hosted by the Department of Justice, the convening will provide a collaborative environment to discuss and share ideas on how State and local stakeholders across the United States can implement common sense reforms so that financial obligations imposed by the government do not lead to unnecessary involvement in the criminal justice system or exacerbate poverty." Critical issues addressed during this meeting include: the increasing use of fines, fees, and bail; the disproportionate impact on low-income individuals and families; fines and fees—an ineffective way to raise funds for incarceration costs. This website provides access to both versions of this White House convening, transcript of Attorney General Loretta E. Lynch, report from the President's Council of Economic Advisors on Fees, Fines, and Bail, a National Journal article about the event, and background materials.
New in the Library
Confabulation in Correctional Settings: An Exploratory Review
Posted: 5 days ago
(2015) This article addresses a little understood issue in corrections—confabulation. "Confabulation can be described as a disruption in normal memory function, whereby the individual unintentionally distorts or fabricates imaginary or non-experienced events without intent to deceive or lie … In other words, individuals who inaccurately integrate incorrect information into their memory and/or subsequently present such information as fact are demonstrating confabulation … Individuals who confabulate are unaware of the falsehood of their statements" (p. 1). Sections of this review include: introduction and overview; diagnostic comorbidity; diagnostic clarification—confabulation and malingering, delusions, or lying; confabulation within correctional settings and important reminders for correctional staff to keep in mind, confabulation in the criminal justice system and possible consequences, clinical considerations, and suggested approaches, and conclusion. "Although confabulation can create significant issues within clinical and forensic settings, the rate of its actual incidence is unknown … Inmates who confabulate may create significant challenges for correctional staff. As a result, correctional professionals are strongly encouraged to understand the risk factors associated with confabulation within offender population" (p. 5).
New in the Library
You've Got Mail: The Promise of Cyber Communication in Prisons and the Need for Regulation
Posted: 1 week ago
(2016) "As with most aspects of life, communications options for incarcerated people are in flux due to technological changes. For practical, political, and technical reasons, communications methods have evolved more slowly in prison than in the outside world, but change is nonetheless here. New technologies such as video visitation and electronic messaging have the potential to improve quality of life for incarcerated people and help correctional administrators effectively run secure facilities. Yet the promise of these new services is often tempered by a relentless focus on turning incarcerated people and their families into revenue streams for both private and public coffers. The lucrative market for prison-based telephone service has received substantial attention since 2012, when the Federal Communications Commission reinvigorated a long-stagnant regulatory proceeding concerning rates and business practices in the ICS market. Although the focus of the FCC proceeding has thus far been on telephone service, ICS is not just limited to voice calls — there are emerging technologies with which a growing number of prisons and jails are experimenting." This is a great report about the technology offenders can use to communicate with people outside a correctional facility and the problems associated with such use. Sections comprising this report are: communication options behind bars--traditional communication channels (i.e., in-person visiting, phone calls, postal communication, and electronic messaging—inbound-only systems, and two-way systems); an overview of the industry-- general ICS providers, commissary operators, financial service firms, specialty companies, procurement practices, revenue and fee structures, end-user pricing; overview of messaging services—benefits of electronic messaging, drawbacks, character limits, and diffusion of accountability; unknowns—protection of data, ownership of contents, and protection of attorney-client privilege; recommendations for the Federal Communications Commission, state legislatures and public utility commissions, and correctional administrators.
New in the Library
Transforming Prisons, Restoring Lives: Final Recommendations of the Charles Colson Task Force on Federal Corrections
Posted: 1 week ago
(2016) "After decades of unbridled growth in its prison population, the United States faces a defining moment. There is broad, bipartisan agreement that the costs of incarceration have far outweighed the benefits, and that our country has largely failed to meet the goals of a well-functioning justice system: to enhance public safety, to prevent future victimization, and to rehabilitate those who have engaged in criminal acts. Indeed, a growing body of evidence suggests that our over-reliance on incarceration may in fact undermine efforts to keep the public safe. Momentum is strong for a new direction, for a criminal justice system guided by proven, cost-effective strategies that reduce crime and restore lives. But translating this impulse for reform into lasting change is no small challenge. This report provides both an urgent call to action and a roadmap for reforming the federal prison system, which, with 197,000 people behind bars, was the largest in the nation as 2015 drew to a close. By adopting the recommendations detailed here, and committing sufficient resources to ensure their effectiveness, we can reduce the federal prison population by 60,000 people over the coming years and achieve savings of over $5 billion, allowing for reinvestment in programs proven to reduce crime. Most important, these proposed reforms and savings can be achieved through evidence-based policies that protect public safety. Such savings will not only bring fiscal responsibility to a policy area long plagued by the opposite tendency, but will also free critical funds the US Department of Justice (DOJ) needs for other priorities, such as national security, state and local law enforcement, and victim assistance. And just as critically, these reforms will make our communities safer by ensuring we send the right people to prison and that they return to society with the skills, supervision, and support they need to stay crime free" (p. ix). Sections comprising this report include: the transformation of the federal corrections system—who the U.S. Bureau of Prisons (BOP) is, federal sentencing reform in the 1980s, the abolition of parole and the increase in time served, policy changes driving BOP growth, consequences due to growth, and the new path; Recommendation 1—Reserve Prison for Those Convicted of the Most Serious Federal Crimes; Recommendation 2—Promote a Culture of Safety and Rehabilitation in Federal Facilities; Recommendation 3—Incentivize Participation in Risk-Reduction Programming; Recommendation 4—Ensure Successful Reintegration by Using Evidence-Based Practices in Supervision and Support; Recommendation 5—Enhance System Performance and Accountability through Better Coordination across Agencies and Increased Transparency; and Recommendation 6—Reinvest Savings to Support the Expansion of Necessary Programs, Supervision, and Treatment.
New in the Library
The Reentry of Formerly Incarcerated Persons: Key Accomplishments, Challenges, and Future Directions; A Report on the National Reentry Symposium: Promising Practices and Future Directions
Posted: 1 week ago
(2015) "In 2014, more than 636,000 people were released from state and federal institutions … approximately 1,750 per day—while another 11.4 million are reported to cycle through our local jails each year … Some return to families, jobs, and welcoming communities but most do not, which may explain—at least in part—why release from confinement and the justice system can be a temporary condition for many. National studies indicate that 67.8% of state prisoners are rearrested within three years of their release, and 76.6% are arrested within five years of their release … Of those rearrested, nearly half—44.9%—are reincarcerated … These high rates of rearrest and reincarceration translate to more victims, escalating correctional and justice system costs, and a cycle of challenges for those who enter the justice system and struggle to stay out. It is no wonder that “reentry” is of paramount concern nationally. “Reentry” is the term used to describe the processes and interventions that equip incarcerated individuals to return home and stay home. Recognizing the importance of effective reentry practices at the federal, state, and local levels, in September 2015, the U.S. Department of Justice, Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP), and the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) co-sponsored the National Reentry Symposium: Promising Practices and Future Directions. The event was the first of its kind in terms of its composition. Leaders and professionals from the federal correctional system worked in partnership with administrators and representatives from state corrections agencies and large urban jails … The culmination of the Symposium was the development of regionally based reentry action plans designed to reduce the likelihood of recidivism through improved coordination and collaboration and the delivery of enhanced evidence-based programs and services " (p. 1-2). Sections comprising this report include: introduction; the National Reentry Symposium; key accomplishments in reentry—coordinating efforts, raising awareness, and strategic reentry processes; facilitating cross-jurisdictional measurement; an overview of the BOP's reentry services; current challenges—individuals who experience health and mental health challenges, aging and end of life justice-involved individuals, justice-involved women, LGBTI (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex) individuals, and reentering veterans; voices of the experienced—the thoughts of three formerly incarcerated individuals about "their experiences in prison and on some of the factors related to in-prison and post-release success" (p. 10); and future directions— Regional Strategic Action Plans, and creating a National Reentry Network.
New in the Library
Sexual Victimization Reported By Juvenile Correctional Authorities, 2007–12
Posted: 2 weeks ago
(2016) This report "presents national estimates of nonconsensual sexual acts, abusive sexual contacts, staff sexual misconduct, and staff sexual harassment reported by correctional authorities in state juvenile correctional systems and local and private juvenile correctional facilities from 2007 to 2012. The report also examines substantiated incidents, including characteristics of victims and perpetrators, location, time of day, nature of injuries, impact on the victims, and sanctions imposed on the perpetrators. Companion tables in the Survey of Sexual Violence in Juvenile Correctional Facilities, 2007 – 2012 Statistical Tables include counts of allegations and substantiated incidents of sexual victimization for each state juvenile correctional system, juvenile correctional facility in Indian country, and sampled locally and privately operated juvenile correctional facility. Data are from BJS's Survey of Sexual Violence (SSV), which has been conducted annually since 2004. Highlights: In 2012, juvenile correctional administrators reported 865 allegations of sexual victimization in state juvenile systems and 613 in local or private facilities and Indian country facilities; The number of allegations per year has fluctuated in state juvenile systems and the rate more than doubled, from 19 per 1,000 youth in 2005 to 47 per 1,000 in 2012; In locally and privately operated facilities, the number of allegations dropped from 2009 to 2011 and then began to rise in 2012. Based on 2-year rolling averages, the rate in 2012 was 13.5 per 1,000 youth, up from 7.2 per 1,000 in 2010; From 2007 to 2012, nearly 9,500 allegations of sexual victimization of youth were reported in state or local and private facilities--Fifty-five percent involved youth-on-youth sexual victimization and 45% involved staff-on-youth sexual victimization; Upon investigation, 25% of the allegations of youth-on-youth sexual victimization and 10% of the allegations of staff-on-youth sexual victimization were substantiated during the 6-year period."
New in the Library
Survey of Sexual Violence in Juvenile Correctional Facilities, 2007–2012 - Statistical Tables
Posted: 2 weeks ago
(2016) "This report presents "jurisdiction- and facility-level counts of allegations and substantiated incidents of nonconsensual sexual acts, abusive sexual contact, staff sexual misconduct, and staff sexual harassment reported by juvenile correctional authorities from 2007 to 2012. Facilities include state juvenile systems, juvenile facilities in Indian country, and sampled locally and privately operated juvenile correctional facilities. These tables accompany Sexual Victimization Reported by Juvenile Correctional Authorities, 2007–12, which provides national estimates and rates of sexual victimization and an in-depth examination of substantiated incidents" (website). "In 2012, juvenile correctional administrators reported 865 allegations of sexual victimization in state juvenile facilities. Of these, 104 were substantiated based on follow-up investigation. More than half (61%) of all allegations involved staff sexual misconduct or staff sexual harassment directed toward a juvenile or youthful offender. Administrators of state juvenile correctional facilities reported slightly more than 4,900 allegations from 2007 to 2012, including 906 allegations of nonconsensual acts, 1,235 allegations of abusive sexual contact, 2,307 allegations of staff sexual misconduct, and 474 allegations of staff sexual harassment" (p. 1).
New in the Library
U.S. Department of Justice Report and Recommendations Concerning the Use of Restrictive Housing [Final Report, Appendixes, and Guiding Principles]
Posted: 2 weeks ago
(2016) There is no doubt that "there are occasions when correctional officials have no choice but to segregate inmates from the general population, typically when it is the only way to ensure the safety of inmates, staff, and the public and the orderly operation of the facility. But as a matter of policy, we believe strongly this practice should be used rarely, applied fairly, and subjected to reasonable constraints. The Department believes that best practices include housing inmates in the least restrictive settings necessary to ensure their own safety, as well as the safety of staff, other inmates, and the public; and ensuring that restrictions on an inmate’s housing serve a specific penological purpose and are imposed for no longer than necessary to achieve that purpose. When officials determine that an inmate must be segregated from the general population, that inmate should be housed in safe, humane conditions that, ideally, prepare the individual for reintegration into both the general prison population and society at large. The stakes are high. Life in restrictive housing has been well-documented—by inmates, advocates and, on occasion, correctional officials themselves. In some systems, the conditions can be severe; the social isolation, extreme. At its worst, and when applied without regard to basic standards of decency, restrictive housing can cause serious, long-lasting harm. It is the responsibility of all governments to ensure that this practice is used only as necessary—and never as a default solution. But just as we must consider the impact on inmates, so too must we consider the impact on correctional staff. These public servants work hard, often for long hours and under difficult conditions, and we must protect them from unreasonable danger. Correctional officers need effective tools to manage the most challenging inmates and protect the most vulnerable. We do not believe that the humane treatment of inmates and the safety of correctional staff are mutually exclusive; indeed, neither is possible without the other. In recent years, numerous correctional systems have succeeded in safely reducing the number of inmates in restrictive housing, including the Federal Bureau of Prisons. Over the past four years, the total number of inmates in the Bureau’s restrictive housing units has declined by nearly a quarter. Under the leadership of its outgoing Director, Charles E. Samuels, Jr., the Bureau has also developed a range of progressive alternatives to restrictive housing—and has done so while supporting and enhancing staff safety. This Report includes a number of additional policy proposals that would help continue the downward trends in the Bureau’s restrictive housing population, while also ensuring that those placed in segregation receive the support and rehabilitative services they need" (p. 1-2). This report is divided into three parts. Part One—Restrictive Housing in the Federal Bureau of Prisons: overview of restrictive housing in the United States; Special Housing Units (SHU); Special Management Units (SMU); USP Administrative Maximum (ADX); Bureau Inmates Requiring Special Considerations; Inmates with Serious Mental Illness (SMI); Inmates with Medical Needs; Young Adults (Age 18-24 at Time of Conviction); Juveniles (Under 18 at Time of Adjudication); and Audits of the Bureau's Restrictive Housing Programs ()CAN Audit, GAO Audit, and BOP Internal Audits). Part Two—Restrictive Housing in Other Correctional and Detention Systems: United States Marshals Service (USMS); Restrictive Housing in the States; Federal Support for State and Local Efforts; Federal Civil Rights Enforcement; and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE). Part Three—Guiding Principles and Policy Recommendations: Guiding Principles; Policy Recommendations for the Bureau of Prisons, National Institute of Corrections (NIC), and the U.S. Office of Justice Programs (OJP)—Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA), and the National Institute of Justice (NIJ); and Additional Policy Recommendation for Diverting Inmates with Serious Mental Illness from Incarceration. Documents making up the appendix are organized into Federal Bureau of Prison's Program Statements, Institution Supplements, audits and reports, and other documents.
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News
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Important corrections news and announcements.
Corrections News
Register Now: Veterans Treatment Court Webinar
Posted: 2 days ago
The BJA Drug Court Technical Assistance Project at American University will conduct the first in a series of interactive webinar sessions on Veterans Treatment Court Programs on Tuesday, February 23, 2016 from 12:00 to 1:00 pm EST, with a follow-up interactive web meeting on Thursday, February 25, 2016 from 12:00 to 1:00 pm EST to discuss applied examples from the previous session and address questions participants have that could not be answered during the first session. Session I: Attorneys, Judges, and Court Personnel as First-Responders: Strategies to Identify and Mitigate Trauma Among Veteran Participants with PTSD and Operational Stress Injuries in Veterans Treatment Court Settings Summary: Forensic stress, which is generated solely by involvement in the criminal litigation, often aggravates symptoms of existing mental health conditions for veterans facing charges. It impairs the defendant s abilities to make reasoned legal decisions and challenges attorneys and other prof
Corrections News
Infographic: Working with Justice-Involved Women
Posted: 4 days ago
From the National Resource Center on Justice Involved Women, this infographic brings together key statistics about women in the criminal justice system. Highlighted statistics: Education: 42% of women in state prisons have not completed high school Employment prior to arrest: 37% earn less than $600 per month Maternal incarceration significantly impacts children: 64% of mothers in state prison lived with at least one of their children just prior to imprisonment View infographic
Corrections News
NRRC Webinar: The Impact of Trauma Exposure on Corrections Professionals
Posted: 5 days ago
The National Reentry Resource Center (NRRC) and the American Probation and Parole Association is presenting this upcoming free webinar trauma exposure and it s impacts and ramifications on corrections professionals. The National Reentry Resource Center provides education, training, and technical assistance to states, tribes, territories, local governments, service providers, non-profit organizations, and corrections institutions working on prisoner reentry. To learn more, click here. Webinar Description: Research suggests that constant exposure to disturbing aspects of human behavior and the pain and suffering of others can come with a price for professionals. This webinar will examine secondary trauma and compassion fatigue as experienced by corrections professionals. It will bring together the latest research on the physiological impact of trauma exposure with simple, realistic techniques that can mitigate the negative effects, improve personal well being, and enhance profession
Corrections News
2016 NIC 3rd Annual Virtual Conference: “Leading with Innovation”
Posted: 1 week ago
CALL FOR PRESENTATIONS The 2016 Annual Virtual Conference hosted by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is a dynamic platform for sharing information with the field of corrections in a virtual online setting. The purpose of this year s conference will be to share current and emergent innovations in correctional practice through a keynote address, workshops, interactive LiveChat, networking, discussion forums, and virtual information booths. This year s theme is Leading with Innovation, and we are looking for the nation s best practitioners to share their work and submit presentations. The goals of the conference are to: 1) Inform the field regarding breaking trends, issues, and solutions in corrections. 2) Demonstrate the link between theory and research to practical applications in the field. 3) Create opportunities for corrections professionals to network with each other. If you have a trend, issue, or solution to share, we encourage you to apply to present. The
Corrections News
Tune in Live: Effective Partnerships for Family-Focused Reentry Services from Urban Institute
Posted: 1 week ago
The Urban Institute is presenting this upcoming free webinar on family-focused reentry services. The Urban Institute promotes using information and evidence based reporting to improve lives and strengthen communities. Webinar Description: This webinar will focus on the importance of partnerships in delivering holistic services to fathers and families impacted by incarceration. Community-based organizations serving individuals and families affected by incarceration frequently partner with governmental and nongovernmental organizations to provide comprehensive services to individuals. These partnerships are critical to engaging in family-focused reentry programming and helping individuals avoid recidivism and reach self-sufficiency and reunification with their families.Panelists: Charisse Johnson, branch chief, Office of Family Assistance, Administration for Children and Families Janeen Buck Willison, senior fellow, Urban Institute Jocelyn Fontaine, senior research associate, Ur
Corrections News
Cooperative Agreement - National Sheriffs’ Institute Facilitation
Posted: 1 week ago
The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is soliciting proposals from organizations, groups, or individuals to enter into a cooperative agreement for a one year period, with two additional option years, to begin at the date of the award. Work under this cooperative agreement will involve facilitation of two offerings per year of the week long National Sheriff s Institute (NSI) beginning in FY 2016. The successful awardee will have the resources to identify and select first term sheriffs, disseminate and collect pre-class assignments and testing, provide instructors for each offering and collect and evaluate participant feedback provided by NSI participants. This project will be a collaborative venture with the NIC Jails Division. DEADLINE: Applications must be received before midnight (ET) on Tuesday, March 1, 2016. Download the full solicitation Learn more about NIC s Cooperative Agreements Please note effective July 1, 2013 the Central Contractor Registration (CCR) w
Corrections News
Register Now! No News Is NOT Good News: The Role of PIOs in Jails
Posted: 2 weeks ago
No News Is NOT Good News: The Role of PIOs in Jails Register Online for this Live-Streaming Internet Broadcast at http://nicic.gov/training/ib201604 April 13, 2016 9am PT / 10am MT / 11am CT / 12pm ET Our tragedies make the news. So should our triumphs. - Karla West, Director of Communications, Davidson County Sheriff s Office Public Information Officers (PIOs) play a vital role in the local jail. The public s perception and/or misperception of jail operations can influence public safety, funding, elections, and numerous other factors. Responding to media inquiries regarding crisis situations is just one of the many roles of the PIO. Building positive rapport with the media, telling your story, engaging the community and conveying your mission are priority tasks for a PIO. The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) will conduct a live-streaming internet broadcast on the evolving role of PIOs in jails. The three-hour broadcast titled No News Is NOT Good News: The Ro
Corrections News
Parenting Program in Bexar County Helps Change an Inmate’s Life
Posted: 2 weeks ago
From Incarcerated Mother to Community Role Model: Unique Parenting Program in Bexar County Credited with Inmate s Turnaround By Rosanne Hughes The current issue of ACA s Correction Today magazine highlights a program for incarcerated mothers called MATCH. Bexar County Jail began MATCH more than 30 years ago. The program provides participants with structured educational classes, e-books, and parent-child contact visits. In March 2014 the program began partnering with Bibliotech, a bookless library in Bexar County. The collaboration provides mothers in the program with e-books on parenting. Participants in MATCH are now housed together which allows them to support and learn from each other. The program addresses many of the issues unique to incarcerated women addiction, trauma, homelessness, and being a single parent. Michele Brown is one of the programs success stories. She participated in the program in the 1990 s. Initially she joined the program because she thought it wou
Corrections News
NIC's Health Reform and Public Safety Webinar Series
Posted: 3 weeks ago
With the advent of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, it is possible for millions of low-income, justice-involved individuals to obtain health care or insurance coverage for their physical and behavioral health needs. This far reaching system change will affect every deci sion point in the criminal justice system, from arrest to reentry. Criminal Justice professionals and Health Care professionals alike have a role in helping these individuals determine eligibility and facilitate enrollment. NIC is pleased to offer a series of webinars that delve into health reform issues in a criminal justice or corrections setting. The series consists of three webinars: Health Literacy: Enhancing Access to Health Care for Justice Involved Individuals Eligibility and Enrollment How Does this Act Actually Work Medicaid Administrative Claiming and Targeted Case Management: Opportunities for Public Safety The webinars were originally broadcast in 2014. All three plus the entire
Corrections News
CJJR Youth in Custody Certificate Program
Posted: 3 weeks ago
The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform Announces the 2016 Youth in Custody Certificate Program: The Center for Juvenile Justice Reform (CJJR) at Georgetown University s McCourt School of Public Policy is pleased to announce that the application period for the 2016 Youth in Custody Certificate Program is now open through March 18, 2016. We invite you to join leaders and participant teams from around the country on the Georgetown campus for a week of intensive study from May 9-13, 2016. The 2016 Youth in Custody Certificate Program is the premiere platform for comprehensive scholarship and exploration of current research and best practices to support youth in post-adjudication custody, and is conducted in part with support from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention s Center for Coordinated Assistance to States. Through targeted modules and expert instructors, the program shines a light on the high-risk juvenile offender population, and helps leaders begin or ac
Older News
Training
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Upcoming training, broadcasts, and e-learning opportunities.
Training Opportunity
Correctional Industries Director's Training
Register Before: July 07, 2016
(Begins September 26, 2016) Correctional Industries Director's Training. Correctional Industry Directors are called upon to provide dynamic and effective leadership which is a critical component in the success of any organization. Expanding leadership knowledge and enhancing leadership skills is the foundation for this training as it helps lay the groundwork for the complex work that must be done in this ever changing and challenging industry.
Training Opportunity
Orientation for Parole Board Chairs
Register Before: July 01, 2016
(Begins September 27, 2016) Parole board chairs, whether appointed by their governor, elected by their peers, or rotated into their role from their seat on the parole board, are in an influential position to lead efforts to improve and reform the transition and reentry system, as well as enhance their board’s capacity to use evidence-based principles in effective offender management. Being an effective chair requires clearly defined roles and strategies to ensure that informed decisions are made relative to the release and return of offenders.
Training Opportunity
Conducting Security Audits
Register Before: June 30, 2016
(Begins September 12, 2016) With NIC’s hands-on, onsite training, gain the experience of auditing out-of-state institutions of various security levels and missions. This 36-hour training program supplements classroom instruction in auditing protocol with tours of assigned facilities and real-world assignments that put newly trained participants in charge of the auditing process.
Training Opportunity
National Sheriffs' Institute
Register Before: June 06, 2016
(Begins September 19, 2016) The National Sheriffs' Institute (NSI), sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) and the National Sheriffs' Association (NSA), is designed to enhance your leadership skills as you take on the challenges of your first term as sheriff. It is the only executive leadership program designed specifically for first-term sheriffs. It was first developed and delivered in the early 1970s and has changed over the years to meet the evolving needs of first-term sheriffs. The program is held in Aurora, Colorado.
Training Opportunity
Planning of New Institutions
Register Before: June 01, 2016
(Begins August 22, 2016) This 32-hour training program teaches the importance of in-depth planning before starting facility design.
Training Opportunity
Orientation for Probation and Parole Chief Executives
Register Before: May 29, 2016
(Begins September 27, 2016) NIC continues to recognize the value of orientation for new probation and parole executives. This 40 hour blended learning course focuses on presenting core competencies and their related skills and behaviors to assist new chief executives with both the immediate knowledge and the long-term skills needed in the areas of leadership, personnel, strategic planning, staff safety, collaboration, fiscal resources, and other organizational development issues.
Training Opportunity
Orientation for New Pretrial Executives
Register Before: May 23, 2016
(Begins July 11, 2016) Extensive training that enhances the effectiveness of pretrial executives in maintaining and capitalizing existing services.
Training Opportunity
New Jail Inspectors Training
Register Before: May 18, 2016
(Begins June 06, 2016) This four-day program is designed to build the knowledge and skills of new detention facility inspectors in their core duties of inspecting, consultation, and technical assistance. In this program participants will examine their role as a detention facility inspector, create a plan for developing positive working relationships with detention officials and other key stakeholders, examine and practice key inspection and consulting skills, plan and carry out a practice inspection and report, review trends impacting detention facilities and standards, and gather contacts, information, and resources for professional development.
Training Opportunity
Orientation for Parole Board Members
Register Before: May 15, 2016
(Begins July 26, 2016) This 40-hour program will help parole board members gain knowledge and skills in the area of informed decision making through evidence-based principles and practices for determining offender risk and motivation for change. It will also help them evaluate the efficacy of release plans. The program emphasizes the critical role of collaboration and partnerships with stakeholders to increase offender success and public safety. The program uses a peer interaction process. Mandatory course components include online sessions, face-to-face training, and independent work.
Training Opportunity
Planning and Implementing Effective Mental Health Services in Jails
Register Before: May 02, 2016
(Begins June 13, 2016) Local jails face significant challenges in managing inmates who are mentally ill. Often jails do not have the trained personnel or other resources to provide adequate services to these inmates and would benefit greatly from a working relationship with the community's mental health service provider. The purpose of this training is to help local jail practitioners and mental health service providers (1) understand key elements of effective mental health services for jail inmates, and (2) forge a productive working relationship that facilitates the provisions of services for offenders with mental illness. The target audience for this training is Sheriffs, Jail Administrators, Jail Healthcare Service Administrators, and Jail and Community Mental Health Providers.
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