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Recently found corrections resources available online.
New in the Library
What Works: The Practitioner's Response to Theory and Evidence: Positive Youth Development [Webinar]
Posted: 11 hrs ago
(2014) "People often assume that youth who engage in delinquent behavior are destined to be lifetime criminals. A different view recognizes that these youth have untapped strengths and assets yet to be identified and developed. The Positive Youth Justice Model, grounded in the principles of Positive Youth Development (PYD), provides a framework for intervening with justice-involved youth in ways that capitalize on their strengths and meet their developmental needs. Panelists will review PYD principles and discuss successes that facilities have experienced with PYD approaches. Learning Objectives: Learn about the three basic assumptions of Positive Youth Development; Understand how they can be used as a framework for designing interventions with justice-involved youth; [and] Discuss successes facilities have experienced in their efforts to implement programming grounded in the principles of PYD." Access to the webinar, transcript, and PowerPoint slides are available.
New in the Library
What Works: The Practitioner's Response to Theory and Evidence: Cognitive Behavioral Approaches [Webinar]
Posted: 11 hrs ago
(2015) "Cognitive behavioral approaches come from two separate psychological theories: cognitive theory says that the way someone thinks will determine their behavior; behavioral theory says that the environment in which a person finds him or herself also affects behavior. The examples presented in this Webinar illustrate the blending of cognitive and behavioral theories resulting in effective practice across custody settings. Panelists share the principles specific to their cognitive behavioral theory approach and how they effectively implemented the approach in juvenile detention, corrections, and adult facilities responsible for youth offenders. Learning Objectives: Describe basic cognitive behavioral theory (CBT) principles and practices; Identify obstacles to implementing CBT approaches in the various practice settings; Discover strategies for implementing CBT approaches in various practice settings; [and] Understand elements of Moral Reconation Therapy, Thinking for Change, and Aggression Replacement Therapy [ART] as specific CBT programs implemented across practice settings." Access to the webinar, transcript, and PowerPoint slides is available at this website."
New in the Library
What Works: The Practitioner's Response to Theory and Evidence: Trauma-Informed Care [Webinar]
Posted: 11 hrs ago
(2014) "This Webinar will provide a training and testimonial to the use and success of Trauma-Informed Care (TIC) in Juvenile Detention Centers. Panelists will explain what TIC is, how to go about implementing it in facilities, as well as what is currently being done in TIC facilities. They will also share their observations and success rates. Learning Objectives: Discuss fiscally responsible, practical ideas on how to create a trauma-informed environment within a secure juvenile justice setting; Understand the potential operational challenges of incorporating trauma-informed principles in a juvenile justice setting and how to address them; Learn about the importance of ensuring resources are available to staff during training; [and] Explore how applying the principles of Trauma Informed Care will benefit both youth in juvenile justice settings and those who work with them. Access to the webinar, transcript, and PowerPoint are available.
New in the Library
An Intermediate Outcome Evaluation of the Thinking for a Change Program
Posted: 5 days ago
(2014) The Thinking for a Change (TFAC) program "teaches problem-solving skills, particularly when interacting with others, in order to increase rational thinking and lead to pro-social interactions and behaviors. In addition, through cognitive restructuring (aka, cognitive self-change), thought processes are modified to reduce thinking patterns that are conducive to criminal behavior, i.e., antisocial attitudes. This evaluation uses a quasi-experimental, non-random, two group pre-test post-test design, and it explores intermediate outcomes that examine whether the program has influenced participant’s self-assessment of their social problem-solving skills and approaches and their acceptance of criminal attitudes … compared to a waiting list comparison group, TFAC group completers do significantly better than their comparison group counterparts on every measure, including positive problem orientation, negative problem orientation, rational problem solving and associated subscales (problem definition and formulation, generation of alternative solutions, decision making, solution implementation and verification), impulsivity/carelessness style, and avoidance style. Moreover, the level of significance of these findings indicates that TFAC does impact participants’ understanding of social problem solving skills and approaches" (p. i). Sections following an executive summary include: introduction; cognitive-behavioral programming and the TFAC program; methodological design; Social Problem Solving Inventory-Revised (SPSI-R) analysis of changes in social problem-solving; Texas Christian University Criminal Thinking Scale (TCU-CTS) analysis; and discussion.
New in the Library
51-Jurisdiction Survey of Solitary Confinement Rules in Juvenile Justice Systems
Posted: 5 days ago
(2013) This "survey provides an overview of policies governing the solitary confinement of juveniles in 50 states and the District of Columbia. The survey allows the reader to understand each state’s approach to imposing this punishment or employing alternatives. This accompanying memo discusses the trends that emerge from the survey, caveats to keep in mind while reading the survey … The survey distinguishes between states that use confinement as a punishment for past actions and states that use confinement non-punitively, to reduce the threat from the juvenile’s behavior to himself, others, or the security of the facility" (p. 1, 2). Each state and the District of Columbia include a long summary which provides in-depth reporting of the state's solitary confinement practices for juveniles and the supporting validation; and a short summary which provides highlights and the source of the law (whether by consent decree, court decision/rule, policy, regulation, self-assessment, settlement agreement, statute, or policy). Attachments include: "Time Limits on Length of Punitive Isolation" bar chart showing the number of states that have no punitive confinement, eight or fewer hours, between 34 and 36 hours, three days, four days, five days, over five days, and no limit; chart showing jurisdictions not allowing punitive confinement for more than a few hours a day, states limiting the amount of time a juvenile may spend in confinement, and states placing no limit on the amount of time a juvenile may spend in confinement; and the map "Limiting Punitive Isolation: Reforming Practices in Juvenile Detention Facilities" showing those states that do not use isolation for over eight hours a day as punishment, and those states that do use isolation for over eight hours as punishment.
New in the Library
Purposeful Neighboring: Creating Reentry-Ready Communities
Posted: 6 days ago
(2013) "Purposeful Neighboring: Creating Reentry-Ready Communities is not intended to be a long, academic book. It is rather a practical book birthed in the fires of providing prisoner reentry services at the local, county, and state levels. Hopefully, it will inspire to you see the real problem and be a part of the real solution … My basic premise is that reentry is NOT the responsibility of the local department of corrections – it is EVERYONE’S responsibility. Until our communities step up and own the responsibility for reintegrating ex-offenders back into the fabric of society, the bitter cycle of recidivism will continue" (p. 5). This publication explains how. Seven chapters comprise this document: whether we really want reentry; understanding recidivism; the reentry reformation; the vision for a reentry-ready community; how to run a local prisoner reentry coalition; fitting it into the larger plan; and the National Reentry Resource Directory.
New in the Library
The State of Sentencing 2014: Developments in Policy and Practice
Posted: 6 days ago
(2015) State level legislative changes to criminal justice policy during 2013 are highlighted. These 54 policy reforms made by 30 states and the District of Columbia impact sentencing, probation and parole, collateral consequences, and juvenile justice. “After a few years of modest decline, the Bureau of Justice Statistics reported that the nation’s prison population grew slightly in 2013. The state prison population numbered 1,574,700, representing an increase of 4,300 since the previous year, but below its high of 1,615,487 in 2009. During that year, the number of federal prisoners showed a modest drop for the first time in several decades. The overall stability of the population in recent years indicates that deeper changes in sentencing policy and practice are necessary if the nation’s enormous prison population is to be significantly reduced. During 2014, legislators in at least 30 states and the District of Columbia authorized a range of law changes and policies that may address the nation’s scale of incarceration. The policy changes highlighted in this report represent approaches that lawmakers can consider to address state sentencing policy and collateral consequences.” (p. 1).
New in the Library
Cell Phones in Facilities
Posted: 1 week ago
(2014) "ASCA and its members have long been concerned with inmates gaining access to cell phones because they are used to carry out criminal activities both inside and outside the prison, placing staff, other inmates and the public at great risk of harm. A recent survey of correctional administrators revealed that 23 percent were tracking the relation between criminal activity outside the prison and the use of cell phones by inmates inside the prison. Despite correctional administrators best efforts to prevent cell phones from being smuggled into prisons and jails, cell phones get into the hands of inmates. Many are found during searches for contraband, but many are not. In 2008, more than 2,800 cell phones were found inside California state prisons, and over the first eleven months of 2008, more than 1,600 cell phones were found in federal prisons. Recognizing that technologies have been developed to prevent these transmissions from inside the prison, ASCA has devoted considerable effort to enable them to use these technologies in a sensible and responsible manner. "
New in the Library
Statewide Risk Assessment in Juvenile Probation
Posted: 1 week ago
(2014) This is the first "thorough systematic scan of the U.S. to determine the extent to which these [risk assessment] tools have been adopted across the country" (p. 1). Sections of this report address" statewide uniform assessment; layered/regional assessment; locally administered assessment; and design variation in assessment tools. An excellent chart shows the use of these tools by state with information supplied according to: state; probation administration; authority—state statute, probation agency policy, state agency recommended, or local policy; risk assessment tool used; and statewide implementation.
New in the Library
The Processing and Treatment of Mentally Ill Persons in the Criminal Justice System: A Scan of Practice and Background Analysis
Posted: 1 week ago
(2015) This "background analysis examines how individuals with mental illness are processed and treated in the criminal justice system and discusses the implications of insufficient or inadequate care for these individuals. In particular, the main objectives of this paper are to review current practice in the processing of mentally ill offenders, assess societal and economic costs associated with recidivism and insufficient care for this population, and highlight promising strategies to tackle challenges involved in the reintegration of mentally ill offenders into society" (p. 1). Sections following an executive summary are: introduction; research objective and focus—severe mental illness among individuals involved in the criminal justice system; data and methodology; findings related to the scope of the problem, costs associated with managing mentally ill individuals in the criminal justice system, current practice and policy, and criminal justice programs and interventions for mentally ill individuals; research and policy recommendations; and conclusion.
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News
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Important corrections news and announcements.
Corrections News
Innovation Webinars in Green Corrections: Integrating Green Corrections
Posted: 14 hrs ago
Over the next several months, you are invited to join us and learn about the latest innovations in green corrections from winners of the Green Corrections Challenge, the federal prize competition hosted by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) to crowdsource and share ideas with the field about green corrections. Through a series of Innovation Webinars, Challenge winners will demonstrate their prize-winning effective practices in the core areas of green corrections: facilities; education and training; and reentry. A final webinar will show how to integrate the three areas. Please mark your calendars for the webinar dates (completed) Thursday, February 19 at 12pm (EST): Making Education and Training Programs Green: Featuring Challenge winner Delaware Department of Corrections, Sussex Community Corrections Center. The webinar will show how their local green program teaches offenders hands-on skills like aquaculture, growing native grasses for beach restoration, and raising be
Corrections News
NIC Live Event – Veterans Treatment Courts: A Second Chance For Vets Who Have Lost Their Way
Posted: 4 days ago
Register Online for this Live-Streaming Internet Broadcast at: http://nicic.gov/training/ib2015 August 26, 2015 3 hour live streaming event 9:00am PT / 10:00am MT / 11:00am CT / 12:00pm ET The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) will be conducting a live-streaming internet broadcast on justice-involved veterans, highlighting the lifesaving role being played by veterans treatment courts across the country. The three-hour broadcast titled Veterans Treatment Courts: A Second Chance for Vets Who Have Lost Their Way, will be aired live on Wednesday, August 26, 2015. From WWII through the continuing global war on terror, there are approximately 21.5 million veterans in the U.S. today. So many of these men, and increasingly women, return home damaged mentally and physically from their time in service. These wounds often contribute to their involvement in the criminal justice system. As a result, veterans are overrepresented in our jails and prisons. For these justice-invol
Corrections News
Register Now! World Congress on Community Corrections
Posted: 4 days ago
Join the Community on July 14-16, 2015 in Los Angeles, California to attend the Second World Congress on Community Corrections. Hosted by the American Probation and Parole Association and the International Community Corrections Association, this Second World Congress will offer an outstanding selection of speakers and time to network, engage, learn, share, and build relationships across the continents. Keynote speakers are confirmed as: Opening Keynote Wednesday, July 15, 10:30am - 11:45am Age of Opportunity: Lessons From the New Science of Adolescence Laurence Steinberg, Ph.D., Distinguished University Professor Laura H. Carnell Professor of Psychology, Temple University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Plenary Keynote Thursday, July 16, 8:45am - 10:00am Mentally Ill Offenders and Implications for Corrections Policy and Practice Jennifer L. Skeem, Ph.D., Professor and Associate Dean of Research, School of Social Welfare Professor, Goldman School of Public Policy, University of
Corrections News
Plan to Attend: Girls Adjudicated as Adults
Posted: 6 days ago
Reserve a spot on your calendar on May 13 for the upcoming webinar, Girls Adjudicated as Adults, sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) and the National Council on Crime Delinquency (NCCD). About the webinar: Over the past three decades, states across the country passed legislation making it easier to move youth under 18 into the adult criminal justice system. Although not widely considered by practitioners, researchers and other related stakeholders, a growing proportion of youth prosecuted as adults are female. This webinar is an opportunity to learn more about the enabling legislation and practice; the challenges faced by adult correctional systems in ensuring safety, providing appropriate programming, staffing and training to a population with differing emotional, psychological, educational and vocational needs. Please join us and bring your questions and thoughts regarding this topic. Date: May 13, 2015 1:00-2:30 EST Register here (Details to f
Corrections News
Connecticut and the National Institute of Corrections Identify Opportunities to Increase Medicaid Enrollment
Posted: 1 week ago
With the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), it is now possible for millions of low-income individuals in the criminal justice system to obtain insurance coverage for their physical and behavioral health care needs. The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) has provided technical assistance to the state of Connecticut for two work sessions to identify opportunities for increasing Medicaid enrollment. The purpose of the first work session was to convene Connecticut stakeholders to identify and discuss opportunities and challenges related to the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Medicaid eligibility determination and enrollment at decision points in the criminal justice system. During this two-day work session, participants developed a map of criminal justice system decision-points, discussed existing ACA enrollment activities, and identified and prioritized opportunities for increasing enrollment. The second work session was convened to follow-up on a particular area of
Corrections News
In the News: Rwanda Entrepreneurial Model Gives Hope to New Jersey Women Ex-Offenders
Posted: 1 week ago
This recent article published in The Huffington Post provides an overview of the Same Sky program offered at the Most Excellent Way Life Center in New Jersey. Rwanda Entrepreneurial Model Gives Hope to New Jersey Women Ex-Offenders describes how the Same Sky model is providing employment and a sense of purpose for female ex-offenders. From the article: Rev. Gloria Walton, founder of Most Excellent Way, gives female ex-offenders a fighting chance. She provides a supportive, sober, and emotionally nourishing space in which these women can live, and pick up the pieces of their lives. Working is critical for Most Excellent Way women. Many owe significant fines, court fees and 85% of female ex-offenders have children to support In Rwanda, Same Sky provides employment for HIV+ women genocide survivors as artisans to craft beautiful jewelry. The Sam Sky model helps fill the employment and income need at the Most Excellent Way. Their income is more than just a check. Beading is calm
Corrections News
Register Now! Health Reform and Public Safety Webinar
Posted: 2 weeks ago
Introducing the third webinar in NIC s Health Reform and Public Safety series . . . Building Service Delivery Capacity to Meet Demand May 28th, 2015 Please note webinar start time/your time zone: 10:00 am-11:30am (PT), 11:00 am- 12:30pm (MT), 12:00pm 1:30pm (CT), 1:00-2:30pm (ET) Target Audience: Criminal Justice Professionals, Corrections Health Professionals, Community-based Providers Register at this link https://nic.webex.com/nic/onstage/g.php?d=710371980 t=a As mentioned in the NIC broadcast Health Reform and Public Safety: New Opportunities, Better Outcomes on June 18, 2014, NIC is pleased to offer the third in a series of follow-up webinars that will delve further into health reform issues in criminal justice and corrections settings. With the advent of Medicaid Expansion under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), numerous states have seen a large increase in their Medicaid population. And there has been no single target population that has witnessed as large an i
Corrections News
New in the Library – Report on Consequences of Disciplinary and Push-out Policies for Girls of Color
Posted: 2 weeks ago
From the African American Policy Forum and the Center for Intersectionality and Social Policy Studies, this 2015 report seeks to increase the awareness of the gendered consequences of disciplinary and push-out policies for girls of color, and, in particular, Black girls. Black Girls Matter: Pushed Out, Overpoliced and Underprotected argues that existing research and public policy is underinformed and often fails to address the risks that black girls and girls of color confront. The research in this report is based on focus groups and stakeholder interviews in Boston and New York City conducted between September 2012 and August 2013. Examples of key observations from the report: In New York and Boston, black boys and girls were subject to larger achievement gaps and harsher forms of discipline than their white counterparts. At-risk young women describe zero-tolerance schools as chaotic environments in which discipline is prioritized over educational attainment. Increased
Corrections News
EBDM Phase V Initiative Makes National News
Posted: 3 weeks ago
This recent article published in USA Today highlights Outagamie County, Wisconsin s Evidence-Based Decision Making (EBDM) Phase V selection and how EBDM differs from traditional criminal justice initiatives. The article, National justice project may turn sentencing on its head, provides views of the potential of EBDM from Outagamie County officials participating in the project. From the article: Judge John Des Jardins, Outagamie County, said he uses his wisdom and common sense when crafting sentences, but the goal of correcting behavior and improving public safety aren t always realized. We know this from seeing the same people time and time again, he said. It s deflating to see that the system isn t working. The new method allows police in the field to make quick decisions on whether someone should be arrested and jailed or given a fine. Jim Duncan, chairman of the county board s public safety committee, said the process should result in a safer community at a lesser cost t
Corrections News
New in the Library: EBDM Phase II Evaluation Report
Posted: 4 weeks ago
The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) recently launched Phase V of the Evidence-Based Decision-Making in Local Criminal Justice Systems (EBDM) Initiative. The purpose of this initiative is to equip criminal justice policymakers in local communities with the information, processes, and tools that will result in measurable reductions of pretrial misconduct and post-conviction reoffending. The initiative is grounded in two decades of research on the factors that contribute to criminal reoffending and the methods the justice system can employ to interrupt the cycle of reoffense. This recent addition to the NIC library focuses on an evaluation of Phase II of the EBDM initiative, which was designed to facilitate collaborative, evidence-based decision-making in local criminal justice systems across the nation by drawing on and applying the findings noted in the Framework. Partnering with a consortium of technical assistance (TA) experts led by the Center for Effective Public Policy
Older News
Training
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Upcoming training, broadcasts, and e-learning opportunities.
Training Opportunity
Veterans Treatment Courts: A Second Chance for Vets Who Have Lost Their Way
Register Before: August 26, 2015
(Begins August 26, 2015) The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) will be conducting a three-hour live-streaming internet broadcast on justice-involved veterans, highlighting the lifesaving role being played by veterans treatment courts across the country.
Training Opportunity
Correctional Industries Director's Training
Register Before: July 24, 2015
(Begins September 22, 2015) Correctional Industries Director's Training. Correctional Industry Directors are called upon to provide dynamic and effective leadership which is a critical component in the success of any organization. Expanding leadership knowledge and enhancing leadership skills is the foundation for this training as it helps lay the groundwork for the complex work that must be done in this ever changing and challenging industry.
Training Opportunity
Offender Employment Retention Specialist (OERS) Training
Register Before: June 26, 2015
(Begins August 24, 2015) The OERS training combines motivational interviewing techniques with cognitive behavioral principles to teach practitioners how to increase the offenders’ motivation for change while addressing the thoughts and feelings that negatively impact employment retention and successful reentry.
Training Opportunity
Large Jail Network Meeting
Register Before: June 19, 2015
(Begins September 27, 2015) The goals of the Large Jail Network are to explore issues facing jail systems from the perspectives of network members with administrative responsibility and to discuss strategies and resources for dealing successfully with these issues.
Training Opportunity
Executive Training for New Wardens
Register Before: June 18, 2015
(Begins September 21, 2015) This 36 hour program helps participants enhance their skills in areas essential to effective leadership and administration of a correctional institution.
Training Opportunity
Conducting Security Audits
Register Before: June 16, 2015
(Begins September 14, 2015) With NIC’s hands-on, onsite training, gain the experience of auditing out-of-state institutions of various security levels and missions. This 36-hour training program supplements classroom instruction in auditing protocol with tours of assigned facilities and real-world assignments that put newly trained participants in charge of the auditing process.
Training Opportunity
Women Offenders: Developing an Agencywide Approach
Register Before: June 13, 2015
(Begins August 11, 2015) This revised blended learning program, with combined independent and on-site activities will total approximately 40 hours over the course of a year. Incorporated into the course requirements are Blended-learning activities to include a webinar, an organizational readiness survey, independent reading and personalized coaching throughout the year to assist agencies in directing their planned change. On-site activities include a 2.5 day, in-class training at the National Corrections Academy in Aurora, Colorado.
Training Opportunity
Executive Excellence Program
Register Before: June 01, 2015
(Begins August 23, 2015) This 10-month executive development program offers innovative learner-centered and competency-based training for future leaders of corrections agencies.
Training Opportunity
Orientation for New Parole Board Members
Register Before: June 01, 2015
(Begins July 28, 2015) This training program helps participants build competencies and skills in performing the tasks that matter most.
Training Opportunity
Chief Jail Inspectors' Network Meeting
Register Before: June 01, 2015
(Begins September 09, 2015) Please note that by applying for this meeting, you acknowledge that (1) you meet the eligibility requirements for the meeting, and (2) that your supervisor supports your application for, and attendance at, this meeting, if selected.
Full Training Catalog
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