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Recently found corrections resources available online.
New in the Library
An End to Silence: Inmate's Handbook on Identifying and Addressing Sexual Abuse|3rd Edition
Posted: 18 hrs ago
(2014) "Though many correctional agencies have taken steps to comply with PREA standards and create safer environments for individuals in their care, inmates in custody still face sexual abuse and harassment by staff or other inmates. Staff and inmates still report problems identifying those at risk of sexual abuse, reporting sexual abuse, and holding those responsible for sexual abuse accountable. This publication is a tool for educating inmates about legal and other mechanisms, including the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA), that can provide protection and redress from sexual abuse in custodial settings" (p. 5). Sections of this handbook are: introduction; what the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) of 2003 is; the National PREA Standards—protections for inmates; dynamics of sexual abuse in custody—screening and victimization history, continuum of sexual activity in custodial settings, and inmate culture and code; reporting—deciding to report, how to report, and what happens after you report; sexual abuse—care and consequences; special populations—youthful inmates, and gender non-conforming inmates; inmates' rights and the law; and conclusion. The following are appended: glossary; state resources; frequently asked questions; and seeking legal assistance.
New in the Library
Kids Doing Time for What's Not a Crime: The Over-Incarceration of Status Offenders
Posted: 1 day ago
(2014) This report is the first thing you should read if you are looking for information about juvenile status offenders. It "was developed in order to produce an up-to-date understanding of the nation’s progress in reducing confinement of status offenders, utilizing newly available data on youth confined in the U.S., in combination with previously available data on juvenile court statistics" (p. 1). Sections of this report cover: key points; purpose and objectives; scope; the uniqueness of status offenses; the push to decriminalize status offenses—the federal Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act (JDDP) and its early impact, and the valid court order (VCO) exception; status offenses assessment for the nation— nationwide levels and trends regarding the confinement of status offenders during 2001 through 2011; the flow of status offenders into the juvenile court pipeline; and the progress in reducing confinement of status offenders.
New in the Library
Reading on the Inside: Programs Help Incarcerated Parents Connect with Their Children through Books
Posted: 1 day ago
(2014) This article describes the Read to Me program. Read to Me, "is one of at least half a dozen around the country that helps incarcerated parents connect with their children at home by making a recording of themselves reading a children’s book. The parents are allowed to send the book and recording to their child, and they can often read the book during an in-person visit as well" (p. 46). This program received the coveted Marshall Cavendish Excellence in Library Programming Award. This article includes "Tips for Starting an Intergenerational Reading Program for Incarcerated Parents" and "Resources for Families Dealing with Incarceration".
New in the Library
Restoring Justice: A Blueprint for Ensuring Fairness, Safety, and Supportive Treatment of LGBT Youth in the Juvenile Justice System
Posted: 5 days ago
(2014) "Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender, or LGBT, youth continue to be significantly over-represented in the nation’s juvenile justice system, even as overall rates of youth incarceration are on the decline … This brief [explains] what works for LGBT youth by outlining the critical components of model juvenile justice policies that are already being implemented around the country and offers sample language that all jurisdictions can adopt" (p. 1-2). Sections of this publication cover: LGBT youth experience high rates of discrimination and abuse; model policies exist and are working; nondiscrimination provisions—nondiscrimination and gender presentation; screening and intake; classification and housing placement—limits on isolation and segregation of LGBT youth, placement decisions based on gender identity, and classification decisions based on individualized assessment; confidentiality; privacy and safety of transgender youth; respectful communication-- no demeaning language, and preferred name and pronoun use; access to LGBT supports; medical and mental health services and treatment-- specific medical and mental health care needs of transgender youth, counseling should not try to change LGBT identity, sex-offender treatment, and provide appropriate medical and mental health care; staff training and policy dissemination; youth education and policy dissemination; and enforcement. "These policy guidelines reflect the best practices already in place around the country. All jurisdictions should adopt similar measures to ensure that LGBT youth under the supervision of the juvenile justice system are treated fairly, are free from harm, and receive the supportive treatment and services they deserve" (p. 13).
New in the Library
Federal Justice Statistics, 2011 - 2012
Posted: 5 days ago
(2015) This report describes "the annual activity, workloads, and outcomes associated with the federal criminal justice system from arrest to imprisonment, using data from the U.S. Marshals Service (USMS), Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Executive Office for U.S. Attorneys (EOUSA), Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts (AOUSC), and Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP). Tables and text describe arrests and investigations by law enforcement agency and growth rates by type of offense and federal judicial district. This report examines trends in drug arrests by the DEA. It also provides the number of offenders returning to federal prison within 3 years of release and includes the most recently available data on sentences imposed and their lengths by type of offense".
New in the Library
Federal Justice Statistics, 2012 - Statistical Tables
Posted: 5 days ago
(2015) This report describes "the annual activity, workloads, and outcomes associated with the federal criminal justice system from arrest to imprisonment, using data from the U.S. Marshals Service (USMS), Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), Executive Office for U.S. Attorneys (EOUSA), Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts (AOUSC), and Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP). Tables and text describe arrests and investigations by law enforcement agency and growth rates by type of offense and federal judicial district. This report examines trends in drug arrests by the DEA. It also provides the number of offenders returning to federal prison within 3 years of release and includes the most recently available data on sentences imposed and their lengths by type of offense".
New in the Library
Federal Justice Statistics, 2011 - Statistical Tables
Posted: 5 days ago
(2015) This report provides "annual data on workload, activities, and outcomes associated with federal criminal cases. Information is acquired on all aspects of processing in the federal justice system, including the number of persons investigated, prosecuted, convicted, incarcerated, sentenced to probation, released pretrial, and under parole or other supervision; initial prosecution decisions, referrals to magistrates, court dispositions, sentencing outcomes, sentence length, and time served. The program collects data from the Executive Office for U.S. Attorneys (EOUSA), the Pretrial Services Agency (PSA), the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts (AO), the U.S. Sentencing Commission (USSC), and the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP). "
New in the Library
Respectful Classification Practices with LGBTI Inmates [Lesson Plans]
Posted: 7 days ago
(2014) "Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex (LGBTI) and gender non-conforming inmates represent particularly vulnerable populations with unique medical, safety, and other needs. Though some of the concerns and vulnerabilities faced by these populations are similar, transgender and gender non-conforming inmates are distinct from gay, lesbian, and bisexual inmates in important respects. Basic principles of risk-based classification should be applied with LGBTI populations, accounting for unique characteristics that may affect their risk of victimization. For transgender inmates, this includes making individualized decisions regarding gender placement (i.e., whether the inmate will be housed in a facility for females or for males). Reception staff must have clear guidelines allowing for the consistent identification of LGBTI inmates and collecting key information relevant to individualized risk assessment. Like other important characteristics, an inmate’s sexual orientation or transgender status will not always be immediately obvious at reception, but can typically be identified with relatively simple procedures" (p. 1). This 60-minute training session explains how to improve the correctional intake and classification process for LGBTI inmates. Contents of this zip file include: "Respectful Classification Practices with LGBTI Inmates: Trainer’s Manual" comprised of the following four lessons—Why LGBTI Responsive Intake and Classification Matters, LGBTI Terminology, Implementing Promising Intake and Classification Practices, and Moving Forward; 14 "Myth or Truth" flash cards; and presentation slides.
New in the Library
Secondary Trauma: The Personal Impact of Working with Criminal Offenders
Posted: 12 days ago
(2013) This is a great article explaining how and why community corrections officers experience traumatic stress on the job and related efforts to address this problem. Sections cover: stress—it comes with the job; number of primary traumatic incidents for officers—28% experience four or more incidents; secondary (indirect ) traumatic stress (STS) or compassion fatigue--symptoms and number experienced—44% of 3-4 symptoms; vicarious traumatization (VT) due to empathetic encounters with victimized individuals and number of incidents experienced—56% of 4 or more; corrections fatigue—symptoms and number experienced—67% of 5 or more; unintended negative consequences of evidence-based practices (EBPs) on trauma exposure; managing stress in the workplace; Maricopa County Adult Probation Department (MCAPD) pilot program to address the impact of trauma exposure; employee stress management model—pre-incident prevention strategies (i.e., Officer Specific Training, and Administration Specific Training), post-incident interventions (i.e., Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) Team, Individual Crisis Intervention (ICI), and stress assessments), and the evaluation of pre/post measures; and author observations.
New in the Library
Public Opinion on Juvenile Justice in America
Posted: 12 days ago
(2014) This issue brief is an excellent overview of how voters in the United States feel about juvenile offenders. It expertly uses infographics to make the information easy to understand and distribute. Topics explained are: voters prioritize services and supervision over incarceration for juvenile offenders; voters say juvenile offenders should be treated differently than adult offenders; voters care less about whether or how long juvenile offenders are incarcerated than about preventing crime; voters are sensitive to the costs of the juvenile justice system; voters want a strong return on their investments in juvenile correctional facilities; voters support reducing the number and time served of low-level juvenile offenders sent to corrections facilities and using savings to improve probation; voters say that nonviolent juvenile offenders should not be in corrections facilities for more than six months; voters say juvenile corrections facilities should be used only for felony-level offenders; voters say status offenders and technical violators should not go to corrections facilities; voters support reinvesting savings from reduced juvenile facility populations into county programs that contribute to state-level savings; 90% of voters want families, schools, and social service agencies to take more responsibility for youth who commit low-level offenses; and most voters say families, schools, and social service agencies should handle low-level offenses and the justice system should be involved only with more serious offenses. "Support for juvenile justice reform is strong across political parties, regions, and age, gender, and racial-ethnic groups" (p. 1).
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News
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Important corrections news and announcements.
Corrections News
In the News: College Is Back In Session In Some Washington Prisons
Posted: 1 day ago
This recent article published in The Seattle Times provides an overview of the newly reinstituted support for college courses in Washington State prisons. Behind Bars, College Is Back In Session In Some Washington Prisons describes the opportunity for inmates, offers views from the professors, and discusses current research on the impact on recidivism and reducing costs of re-incarceration. From the article: Inmates who take college classes say that wrestling with big ideas stretches their intellectual muscles and relieves the monotony of prison life. The professors say they don t dumb down the coursework for their prison classes. For most inmates, that s meant having to step up their writing skills and take remedial math. Some courses are offered through the privately funded Freedom Education Project of Puget Sound (FEPPS). Twelve professors from UPS, the University of Washington, Seattle Pacific University, Tacoma Community College and Harvard Extension School receive a sti
Corrections News
Recently Released - Gender Responsive Discipline and Sanctions Policy Guide for Women’s Facilities
Posted: 1 day ago
From the National Resource Center on Justice Involved Women, this guide is designed to assist corrections professionals in revising discipline and sanctions policies and practices to more effectively manage women inmates, and create safer facilities for staff and inmates. It builds on a growing body of research and practice that supports an approach to discipline and sanctions tailored to women inmates. It also provides a synopsis of American Correctional Association (ACA) standards, and case law relevant to discipline and sanctions policies and practices for women. The guide is divided into six sections: Overview: Provides a rationale for revising discipline and sanctions in women s facilities, including the benefits and challenges of engaging in this work. Process: Describes a step-by-step process for reviewing and revising discipline and sanctions policies and practices. Includes ten components to consider when revising policies. Research Implications: Provides impli
Corrections News
Upcoming CJCA Webinars: Five Guiding Principles for Providing High-Quality Education in Juvenile Justice Secure Care Settings
Posted: 6 days ago
Join this free webinar hosted by Council of Juvenile Correctional Administrators (CJCA), a national non-profit organization formed to improve juvenile correctional services, programs and practices, in partnership with the Center for Educational Excellence in Alternative Settings (CEEAS). These two webinars will offer practical advice on the Guidance Package released jointly by the U.S. Departments of Justice and Education on December 8, 2014. Webinar Title: Five Guiding Principles for Providing High-Quality Education in Juvenile Justice Secure Care SettingsWebinar Descriptions: The first webinar is scheduled for 2:00 pm EST on Jan. 29, 2015 and will focus on the Departments five Guiding Principles for Providing High-Quality Education in Juvenile Justice Secure Care Settings. This webinar will be moderated by David Domenici, Executive Director of CEEAS. Register HereThe second webinar is scheduled for 2:00 pm EST on Feb. 14, 2015 and will focus on the three Dear Colleague Letters
Corrections News
New!! In the NIC Library – Video Visiting in Corrections: Benefits, Limitations, and Implementation Considerations
Posted: 8 days ago
Approximately 200,000 women are in U.S. prisons and jails with a significant percentage being the sole parent or caregivers of minor, adolescent and teen-aged children. For children, having a parent in prison can affect their mental health, social behavior, and educational prospects (La Vigne, Davies, Brazzell, 2008). The challenge for these children who lose contact with their mothers and who can also be separated from siblings and placed in unsatisfactory living circumstances, whether with family, friends, or in foster care, is very real. For incarcerated women, this knowledge contributes to parental stress, one of a number of areas found in the research as a contributor to negative outcomes for women both in correctional and community-based settings. (Achieving Accurate Pictures of Risk and Identifying Gender Responsive Needs: Two New Assessments for Women Offenders, Van Voorhis, Salisbury, Wright, Bauman, 2008). Additional related research states women s economic marginalizat
Corrections News
Newly Released - Behavior Management of Justice-Involved Individuals: Contemporary Research and State-of-the-Art Policy and Practice
Posted: 15 days ago
The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) and the Center for Effective Public Policy are pleased to announce the release of NIC s publication, Behavior Management of Justice-Involved Individuals: Contemporary Research and State-of-the-Art Policy and Practice, a document authored by Madeline M. Carter, Principal, Center for Effective Public Policy. This document can be accessed at http://nicic.gov/Library/029553. All justice-involved individuals who are under community supervision are expected to abide by a set of conditions. Unfortunately, a significant portion will violate one or more of their terms and conditions of supervision at some point, either by committing a new offense or by committing a technical violation an infraction related to failing to comply with the technical rules set by the releasing authority. Many of these individuals will be incarcerated as a result of a violation. Yet, incarcerating individuals for violations does not necessarily achieve the desired p
Corrections News
New in the Library: A Guide to Video Visiting in Corrections
Posted: 16 days ago
Visits from family members, children and other sources of support can be a lifeline in the lives of incarcerated men and women. Yet, visiting takes on added dimensions with the challenges imposed by geographical distance between facilities and visitors, cost implications for transportation, lodging, childcare, lost wages and the roadblocks often presented from institutional security procedures. Emerging research speaks to the importance of building and maintaining healthy family and community connections for men and women, during their period of incarceration as well as for planning and implementing the reentry process. The advent of video visiting has enhanced traditional methods of building and sustaining those critical connections for incarcerated individual, it is also an industry which is expanding exponentially. Little replaces the opportunities for families to see one another in person, but in those situations where that is not possible, video visiting is a viable option.
Corrections News
Register Now - NIC Live Broadcast "Offender Reentry: The Value of Victim Involvement"
Posted: 18 days ago
Offender Reentry: The Value of Victim Involvement February 18, 2015 - Join us for a three hour live broadcast focusing on the unique opportunities and challenges of including victims in the offender reentry process. I think during reentry that a crime victim should be viewed as an opportunity, not an obligation. They can bring great input to the process. Anne Seymour, National Victims Advocate February 18, 2015 9am PT / 10am MT/AZ / 11am CT/ 12pm ET Register Now at this link http://nicic.gov/training/ib2015feb (green button on the right) Overview Join us for a live broadcast focusing on the unique opportunities and challenges of including victims in the offender reentry process. During this three hour program, we will explore the current points in the criminal justice reentry continuum where victims can and should have a voice. By including victims we can obtain more balanced information about the offender and their offense history which can positively impact reen
Corrections News
Innovation Webinars in Green Corrections
Posted: 19 days ago
Over the next several months, you are invited to join us and learn about the latest innovations in green corrections from winners of the Green Corrections Challenge, the federal prize competition hosted by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) to crowdsource and share ideas with the field about green corrections. Through a series of Innovation Webinars, Challenge winners will demonstrate their prize-winning effective practices in the core areas of green corrections: facilities; education and training; and reentry. A final webinar will show how to integrate the three areas. Please mark your calendars for the webinar dates Tuesday, January 27 at 12pm (EST) Implementing Green Practices in Correctional Facilities: Featuring tied Challenge winners FCC Victorville Federal Bureau of Prisons (California) and the Franklin County Sheriff s Office (Ohio). FCC Victorville implemented a program to reduce solid waste by 75 percent over a five-year period. They developed an in-house
Corrections News
New in the Library – Justice for Girls: Are We Making Progress?
Posted: 22 days ago
From the Boston College Law School, this faculty paper by Francine T. Sherman discusses the history of juvenile justice policy for girls and considers the impact on girls of current trends toward developmentally centered and data-driven juvenile justice. As Sherman states, The majority of girls in the system are there for status and misdemeanor offenses and violations of probation. Both the behaviors that result in girls arrests and the structural mechanisms that pull them into the justice system for those behaviors relate to child development. Girls behaviors should be understood ecologically, as reactions to and in tension with the concentric circles of family, community, and society in girls lives, and it is that ecological framing that provides more nuanced and developmentally informed responses . Sections of this article include: the history of girls and juvenile justice; child development, juvenile justice policy, and girls; what It means for girls; trauma; domestic viol
Corrections News
NIC Virtual Conference: Call for Presentations
Posted: 23 days ago
The NIC Academy Division is currently accepting proposals to present workshops for the NIC Virtual Conference 2015: New Directions in Corrections. The Conference will go live June 10, 2015 from 9:00 AM MT to 2:00 PM MT. Join your colleagues as we learn together about current trends and issues in corrections, cutting-edge work in corrections, research-informed programs, and thought-provoking inspirational innovations that promote the best in corrections. The 2015 Virtual Conference will have an emphasis on the topic of Correctional Staff Wellness. However, a variety of topics are encouraged and examples include: undocumented immigrants, racial disparity in offender population and effects of privatization. Submission Deadline: February 10, 2015 Download details for submitting presentations here
Older News
Training
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Upcoming training, broadcasts, and e-learning opportunities.
Training Opportunity
Correctional Industries Director's Training
Register Before: July 24, 2015
(Begins September 22, 2015) Correctional Industries Director's Training. Correctional Industry Directors are called upon to provide dynamic and effective leadership which is a critical component in the success of any organization. Expanding leadership knowledge and enhancing leadership skills is the foundation for this training as it helps lay the groundwork for the complex work that must be done in this ever changing and challenging industry.
Training Opportunity
Offender Employment Retention Specialist (OERS) Training
Register Before: June 26, 2015
(Begins August 24, 2015) The OERS training combines motivational interviewing techniques with cognitive behavioral principles to teach practitioners how to increase the offenders’ motivation for change while addressing the thoughts and feelings that negatively impact employment retention and successful reentry.
Training Opportunity
Large Jail Network Meeting
Register Before: June 19, 2015
(Begins September 27, 2015) The goals of the Large Jail Network are to explore issues facing jail systems from the perspectives of network members with administrative responsibility and to discuss strategies and resources for dealing successfully with these issues.
Training Opportunity
Executive Training for New Wardens
Register Before: June 18, 2015
(Begins September 21, 2015) This 36 hour program helps participants enhance their skills in areas essential to effective leadership and administration of a correctional institution.
Training Opportunity
Conducting Security Audits
Register Before: June 16, 2015
(Begins September 14, 2015) With NIC’s hands-on, onsite training, gain the experience of auditing out-of-state institutions of various security levels and missions. This 36-hour training program supplements classroom instruction in auditing protocol with tours of assigned facilities and real-world assignments that put newly trained participants in charge of the auditing process.
Training Opportunity
Women Offenders: Developing an Agencywide Approach
Register Before: June 13, 2015
(Begins August 11, 2015) This revised blended learning program, with combined independent and on-site activities will total approximately 40 hours over the course of a year. Incorporated into the course requirements are Blended-learning activities to include a webinar, an organizational readiness survey, independent reading and personalized coaching throughout the year to assist agencies in directing their planned change. On-site activities include a 2.5 day, in-class training at the National Corrections Academy in Aurora, Colorado.
Training Opportunity
Orientation for New Parole Board Members
Register Before: June 01, 2015
(Begins July 28, 2015) This training program helps participants build competencies and skills in performing the tasks that matter most.
Training Opportunity
National Sheriffs' Institute
Register Before: May 29, 2015
(Begins August 30, 2015) The National Sheriffs' Institute (NSI), sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) and the National Sheriffs' Association (NSA), is designed to enhance your leadership skills as you take on the challenges of your first term as sheriff. It is the only executive leadership program designed specifically for first-term sheriffs. It was first developed and delivered in the early 1970s and has changed over the years to meet the evolving needs of first-term sheriffs. The program is held in Aurora, Colorado.
Training Opportunity
Planning of New Institutions
Register Before: May 22, 2015
(Begins August 24, 2015) This 32-hour training program teaches the importance of in-depth planning before starting facility design.
Training Opportunity
Correctional Leadership Development
Register Before: May 15, 2015
(Begins July 14, 2015) Through the use of instrumentation, participant dialogue, strategic thinking, and experiential activities, participants identify their leadership strengths and create a personal leadership development plan.
Full Training Catalog
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