U.S. Department of Justice
New in the Library
Colorado Reference Guide: Juvenile Screening and Assessment Instruments: Behavioral Health, Trauma, and Risk/Classification
Posted: 51 mins ago
(2013) "One of the most important elements in any service delivery system is the identification of needs, risks and strengths of children, youth and families. The accurate screening and assessment of these individuals and family systems are necessary to develop appropriate, individualized service packages. The use of valid screening and assessment tools will assure that safety risks (either to the public or the youth) are identified accurately and appropriate interventions are implemented, that urgent needs are recognized and dealt with quickly, and that services provided will likely result in positive outcomes … Specifically, the decision to include each instrument is based on the following: 1) The instrument must be directly related to behavioral health, trauma and/or risk classification; and 2) The instrument must be age and developmentally appropriate; and 3) The instrument must be quantitative; and 4) The instrument must be researched-based; and 5) The instrument must have empirical evidence that supports its utility. All screening and assessment instruments in this reference guide have acceptable reliability and validity data associated with them and all have, to some degree, been independently evaluated" (p. 4). There are 12 juvenile screening instruments and 11 juvenile assessment instruments described. Information provided for each instrument is: a brief description of the instrument; the Colorado agency using it; the juvenile population being targeted; the instrument's purpose; when the instrument is administered; the decisions that can be made using the instrument; skills needed by those who give the assessment or screening; training required by this person; cost; and contact information with website (if available).
New in the Library
Policy Implications of Police-Probation/Parole Partnerships: A Review of the Empirical Literature
Posted: 52 mins ago
(2013) This article examines the benefits and challenges of interagency collaboration between law enforcement and community corrections. "The primary assumption of these programs is that both entities possess distinct intelligence and resources that if combined should better address, prevent, or intervene in the violence perpetuated by this criminogenic population" (p. 2). Sections cover: history of police-probation/parole partnerships; research and evaluation on partnerships; problems associated with partnership; and seven recommendations for policy and practice on police-probation/parole partnerships.
New in the Library
Race and Punishment: Racial Perceptions of Crime and Support for Punitive Policies
Posted: 2 days ago
(2014) "To guide and give greater momentum to recent calls for reform, this report examines a key driving force of criminal justice outcomes: racial perceptions of crime. A complex set of factors contributes to the severity and selectivity of punishment in the United States, including public concern about crime and racial differences in crime rates. This report synthesizes two decades of research establishing that skewed racial perceptions of crime – particularly, white Americans’ strong associations of crime with racial minorities – have bolstered harsh and biased criminal justice policies" (p. 3). Eight sections follow an executive summary: introduction; public support for punitive policies—historical changes in punitive sentiment, and the racial gaps in punitiveness and victimization; racial perceptions of crime—overestimating Black and Hispanic crime rates, and implicit biases against people of color; racial perceptions of crime linked to punitiveness; sources of racial perceptions of crime; punitiveness linked to other racial gaps in views and experiences—Whites' limited and favorable criminal justice contact, racial prejudice, and individualistic accounts of crime; consequences of a biased and punitive criminal justice system—eroded perceived legitimacy, and undermining public safety; and remedies and recommendations for the media and researchers, policymakers, and practitioners and other stakeholders.
New in the Library
Rethinking the Use of Community Supervision
Posted: 2 days ago
(2013) "This Article examines the reasons why community supervision so often fails and challenges popular assumptions about the role community supervision should play in efforts to reduce overreliance on imprisonment. While probation and post-release supervision serve important purposes in many cases, they are often imposed on the wrong people and executed in ways that predictably lead to revocation" (p. 1015). Six sections make up this article: introduction; history and structures of community supervision—probation and post-release supervision; the dynamics of revocation—conditions of release, methods of supervision, and responses to rule violations; responses to the problem of revocation; the different approach of limiting community supervision—limiting the sanction, limiting release conditions, and limiting terms of supervision; and conclusion.
New in the Library
Through Their Eyes: How Prisoners Make Sense of Their Incarceration
Posted: 3 days ago
(2014) This is an excellent article if you want to understand how inmates feel about incarceration. "A new theoretical framework looks at punishment from the prisoner's perspective and reveals how the lived experience of punishment differs from the punishment conceived by lawmaker" (p. 1). Sections cover: what punishment is; the salience and severity of punishment; narratives of penal consciousness; the role of supervision style and gender; and potential policy implications.
New in the Library
The Impact of Family Visitation on Incarcerated Youth's Behavior and School Performance: Findings from the Families as Partners Project
Posted: 3 days ago
(2013) The relationships between family visitation and an incarcerated youth's behavior and performance in school are examined. The project studied was Families as Partners, a collaboration between the Vera Institute and Ohio Department of Youth Services (DYS). Sections of this brief include: introduction; background about the collaboration; data and methodology for this study; findings regarding the impact of visitation on behavior and school performance—youth characteristics, family contact frequency, behavior incidents, and school performance; and conclusion. "Vera researchers found that family visitation of incarcerated youth was associated with improved behavior and school performance. These findings highlight the importance of visitation and suggest that juvenile correctional facilities should try to change their visitation policies and related practices to promote more frequent visitation with families" (p. 1).
New in the Library
Disproportionate Minority Contact and Status Offenses
Posted: 7 days ago
(2014) This report looks at the significant overrepresentation of minority youth among juvenile status offenders. Sections of this publication includes: issue background; the need to focus on non-delinquent youth; addressing disproportionality among status offenders; new data on status offenses and disproportionality; and implications for juvenile justice reform.
New in the Library
A Comparison of Risk Assessment Instruments in Juvenile Justice
Posted: 7 days ago
(2013) “This study examined the validity, reliability, equity, and cost of nine juvenile justice risk assessment instruments. Though many researchers and practitioners believe that risk assessment is critical to improving decision making in the juvenile justice system, the range of options currently available makes the selection of the most appropriate instrument for each jurisdiction a difficult choice. This study was designed to provide a comprehensive examination of how several risk assessments perform in practice” (p. 1). Findings are reported: according to eight risk assessment instruments; and through a comparison of results across jurisdictions and assessments by way of reliability, validity, equity, revised risk assessment instruments constructed in the study, and efficiency and cost. A discussion covers: instruments developed for general use; risk instruments developed for a specific agency; and comments from Advisory Board members and responses from the authors of this report. “Risk assessment should be a simple process that can be easily understood and articulated. This study’s findings show that simple, actuarial approaches to risk assessment can produce the strongest results. Adding factors with relatively weak statistical relationships to recidivism—including dynamic factors and criminogenic needs—can result in reduced capacity to accurately identify high-, moderate-, and low-risk offenders” (p. vi).
New in the Library
Juvenile Probation Officer and Caseworker: Self-Instructional Manual
Posted: 8 days ago
(2012) This is an excellent resource for anyone wanting an in-depth introduction to the field of juvenile probation. “Chapters 1-11 of this manual describe the laws, court rules, and procedures used in juvenile delinquency cases and personal protection order cases involving a minor, and address the cases in which a juvenile may be tried and sentenced as an adult. Chapters 12-20 focus on practical issues related to day-to-day functions” (p. 12). This manual is comprised of 20 chapters: overview; jurisdiction, transfer, and waiver; custody and detention; preliminary inquiries, diversion, consent calendar, and formal calendar; petitions and preliminary hearings; adjudication, dispositional hearings, and dispositional options/orders; review of juvenile dispositions; restitution; probation violations; minor personal protection order (PPO) proceedings; access to court records; ethics for probation officers; interviewing, report writing, and testifying in court; case management; continuum of services and funding; drugs of choice; juvenile sexual offenders, assessment, and treatment; gangs; and mental health issues.
New in the Library
T.E.A.M., Teach, Empower, Affirm, Mentor: A Risk Reduction Mentoring Curriculum, Instructor’s Manual [Facilitator’s Manual]
Posted: 8 days ago
(2014) The use of this training program will empower the youth under your custody and improve public safety. “The philosophy of this curriculum is to directly target factors that have been found to put middle-school students at-risk for engaging in delinquent behaviors to decrease the rates of delinquency among these youth. The four risk factors with the most robust empirical support are: (1) truancy, (2) lack of school engagement, (3) association with deviant peers, and (4) victimization. This curriculum seeks to teach middle-school students skills and strategies to combat each of the four risk factors. These strategies are taught in the context of a group mentoring program in which the participants receive didactic instruction as well as opportunities to be supported by mentors as they practice using the skills. The curriculum is designed to be engaging and practical, with strategies the participants can apply in their daily lives. The curriculum also takes a strength-based approach with an emphasis on empowering youth” (p. 4). This training program is divided into 25 session. Introduction: Session 1 – Getting to Know You. School Engagement: Session 2 – Check and Connect; Session 3 – Truancy; Session 4 – Adult Images; Session 5 –- Timelines; Session 6 – Possible Selves and Strategies; Session 7 – Problem-Strategies; Session 8 – Study Skills; and Session 9 – Review School Engagement. Peer Relationships: Session 10 – Function of Friendships and Peer; Session 11 – Choosing Friends; Session 12 – Showing Respect; Session 13 – Listening Skills; Session 14 – Resisting Peer Pressure; Session 15 – Values in Friends; Session 16 – Ending Friendships; and Session 17 – Review of Peer Pressure. Victimization: Session 18 – Targets; Session 19 – Risk Reduction; Session 20 – Bullying / Bully Insight Game; Session 21–Bullying / Recognizing Bullying; Session 22–Bullying – Bystanders; Session 23–Bullying – What is Cyber bullying?; and Session 24 – Victimization Review. Wrap-Up/Termination: Session 25 – Overall Review and Goodbye.
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Corrections News
Understanding Intimate Partner Violence
Posted: 2 days ago
The Center for Disease Control (CDC) defines Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) as a serious, preventable public health problem that affects millions of Americans. The term intimate partner violence describes physical, sexual, or psychological harm by a current or former partner or spouse. This type of violence can occur among heterosexual or same-sex couples and does not require sexual intimacy. The Correctional Association of New York describes the impact of IPV to women in corrections noting that the vast majority of women in our correctional systems either have, are currently or will experience interpersonal violence in their lives. Estimates are that three-quarters have histories of severe physical abuse by an intimate partner during adulthood, and 82% suffered serious physical or sexual abuse as children. This is a critical issue impacting women in our systems and those that are preparing for reentry into the community. The most recent National Intimate Partner and Sexual
Corrections News
Register: An Informational Webinar on NIC's Dosage Probation Solicitation
Posted: 3 days ago
An Informational Webinar on NIC s Dosage Probation Solicitation Date: Monday, September 29, 2014 Time: Please note webinar start time/your time zone: 10:00-11:30am PT / 11:00-12:30pm MT/AZ/ 12:00pm-1:30pm CT / 1:00pm-2:30pm ETTarget Audience: Multidisciplinary teams (i.e., courts, corrections, prosecution, defense, probation, victim services, and treatment) at the county and/or city level Register: To register for the webinar, visit https://nic.webex.com/nic/onstage/g.php?d=714012630 t=a Overview: The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) seeks to identify two jurisdictions to engage in a partnership to pilot test a new model of probation supervision, Dosage Probation. The Dosage Probation Model builds on evidence-based and promising practices to restructure sentencing and probation management practices, with the goal of improving offender outcomes (i.e., recidivism reduction) and decreasing the costs associated with lengthy supervision terms. Key elements of the Dosage
Corrections News
If you are looking for information on suicide prevention in custody, this web site is for you
Posted: 3 days ago
Suicide is a leading cause of death within jails, prisons and juvenile facilities throughout the country. The National Center on Institutions and Alternatives (NCIA) is recognized as one of the leading experts in the prevention of suicide in custody. NCIA s Suicide Prevention in Custody Services, under the direction of Program Director Mr. Lindsay M. Hayes, provide services to local and state correctional agencies throughout the country to help alleviate the risk of inmate suicide and costly litigation. According to NCIA all correctional facilities, regardless of size, should have a detailed written suicide prevention policy. At a minimum, the policy should address each of the following eight critical components. Staff Training, Identification/Referral/Evaluation, Communication, Housing, Levels of Observation/Management, Intervention, Reporting, and Follow-Up/Morbidity-Mortality Review. One of the keys to suicide prevention is staff training - which is also an effective
Corrections News
Utah’s Mental Health Crisis Intervention Training Is National Model for Patrol and Detention
Posted: 5 days ago
By Brandee Casias, Detective, Salt Lake County Police Department, Salt Lake City, Utah Crisis Intervention Teams and crisis intervention training (CIT) have become a best practice in how patrol officers interact with mentally ill individuals. CIT skills and knowledge often make it possible for first responders to connect mentally ill persons with community care so they aren t admitted to jail. The same knowledge and interpersonal skills can be beneficial in the detention environment. This article describes the State of Utah s approach to delivering CIT training to patrol and corrections officers via regional partnerships of law enforcement and mental health agencies. CIT Utah introduced its CIT Academy for correction officers in 2007. To date, 25 corrections academies have been held, and 650 sworn and non-sworn personnel have been trained. The Salt Lake City Police Department is the administering agency for the CIT Utah program and is one of six national learning sites for spec
Corrections News
Current Research on Drug Abuse Treatment Practices and Outcomes in Correctional Settings
Posted: 7 days ago
The Institute of Behavioral Research at Texas Christian University (IBR) is a leading national research center for the evaluation of drug abuse treatment in criminal justice settings. Research conducted at IBR is intended to generate and disseminate knowledge that impacts state, national, and international policy decisions in the addictions field. In 2002, IBR was one of nine national research centers selected by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) to study drug treatment practices and outcomes and to examine strategies for improving treatment services for drug-involved offenders. Today, the IBR/TCU Treatment System includes a set of assessments and manual-guided interventions that target specific needs and status of clients in different stages of change during treatment. IBR Criminal Justice Drug Abuse Treatment Studies (CJDATS II) focus on organizational and system-level implementation strategies, and are designed to identify implementation strategies that maximi
Corrections News
Register Now - Women Offenders: Developing an Agencywide Approach
Posted: 8 days ago
Women Offenders: Developing an Agencywide Approach, is a blended-learning program delivered in 3 phases with independent learning and on-site activities to include a) 1 on-line virtual instructor-led event; b) assigned independent reading, completion of an organizational readiness survey and gathering agency information and data to be used during the on-site training; c) 20 hours of classroom delivery over 2.5 days and d) follow-up coaching for each agency team. Each phase builds upon the previous one and all participants must be available to participate in all phases of the program. Each participant is required to come to the on-site classroom portion of the training (Phase 2) with fundamental knowledge about this population. Some participants will come with experience in working directly with women and have some familiarity with the research and recommended practice. For those who do not have this experience and information, it is critical that you read and familiarize yourse
Corrections News
PRC Upcoming Webinars & Events
Posted: 9 days ago
The National PREA Resource Center (PRC), operated by the National Council on Crime and Delinquency through a cooperative agreement with the Bureau of Justice Assistance will be offering several PREA webinars in fall 2014. Check the the PRC website for the most up-to-date information. All are free to attend. From the PRC Website: Upcoming Webinars The Clock Is Ticking: The Who, When, and How of Jail AuditsThursday, September 18, 2014 (2:00 3:30 p.m. EDT)Click here to learn more. Click here to register. PREA in Action Committing to Safety and Respect for LGBTI Youth and Adults in Correctional Settings: Lessons From the FieldThursday, September 25, 2014 (3:00 4:30 p.m. EDT)Click here to learn more. Click here to register. Demystifying the Jail Audit Prep and ProcessThursday, October 16, 2014 (2:00 3:30 p.m. EDT)Click here to learn more. Click here to register. Upcoming Events/Conferences September 14 16, 2014: 81st Annual Conference of the Virginia Sheriffs Associatio
Corrections News
New in the Library: Young Women of Color with Criminal Records
Posted: 9 days ago
From the Community Legal Services (CLS) of Philadelphia, Young Women of Color with Criminal Records: A Barrier to Economic Stability for Low-Income Families and Communities, presents data showing the degree to which minority women are impacted by their past criminal records. Highlighted from the report: In the past two years (2012 and 2013), CLS has provided legal assistance to 406 young people between the ages of 17 and 30 with criminal records barriers. Of these young people, 63.88% (or 260) are women, while 35.87% (or 146) are men. Of these young women, 87% are black and 6% are Latina. In that same time period, CLS provided legal assistance to 988 clients age 30 and older with criminal records barriers. Of these clients, 47.37% (or 469) are women while 52.42% (or 519) are men. Despite this more even split, women are still overrepresented compared to the population of people with criminal records generally. Of female clients age 30 and over, 89% are black and 4% are L
Corrections News
Science.gov: Your Gateway to U.S. Federal Science
Posted: 10 days ago
Science.gov is widely considered the go-to Web portal for authoritative government science information. Just one query on Science.gov enables users to search over 55 scientific databases and an index of over 2200 federal agency Web sites for government-funded research and development or similar activities in which there is a U.S. Government investment. It does not include sites that require a password or other access privilege. Users may search for information based on subject rather than by the agency sponsoring it, allowing users to access one site instead of many to find government science information. Content may consist of scientific or technical data, publications, databases, or contacts for experts in key areas such as health, defense, the environment, and science education. Hosted by the Department of Energy, Science.gov is governed by the interagency Science.gov Alliance. Science.gov is also available to the Spanish-speaking public as Ciencia.Science.gov.
Corrections News
Register Now: International Association of Correctional Training Personnel Conference
Posted: 14 days ago
The International Association of Correctional Training Personnel (IACTP) is an association of training professionals from national, state and local correctional agencies. Their 30th Annual Trainers Conference is scheduled for Scottsdale, Arizona from October 5-8, 2014. This conference is your opportunity to network and share innovative approaches being used within correctional agencies throughout the country. o Training Dates: October 5-8, 2014 o Apply By: Early registration at group rate through September 12 - regular rates after September 12 o Conference at a Glance: o Register here:
Older News
Training Opportunity
Executive Excellence Program
Register Before: March 31, 2015
(Begins May 31, 2015) This 10-month executive development program offers innovative learner-centered and competency-based training for future leaders of corrections agencies.
Training Opportunity
Executive Excellence Program
Register Before: December 31, 2014
(Begins March 15, 2015) This 10-month executive development program offers innovative learner-centered and competency-based training for future leaders of corrections agencies.
Training Opportunity
Jail Administration
Register Before: December 19, 2014
(Begins March 23, 2015) Jail administrators have significant responsibility and liability in ensuring that jail operations are conducted safely, securely, legally, and humanely. This 36-hour program focuses on the basic skills and competencies jail administrators need to effectively meet this responsibility.
Training Opportunity
Large Jail Network Meeting
Register Before: December 19, 2014
(Begins March 22, 2015) The goals of the Large Jail Network are to explore issues facing jail systems from the perspectives of network members with administrative responsibility and to discuss strategies and resources for dealing successfully with these issues.
Training Opportunity
Orientation for Probation and Parole Executives
Register Before: December 19, 2014
(Begins February 09, 2015) NIC continues to recognize the value of orientation for new probation and parole executives. This 40-hour blended learning course focuses on presenting core competencies and their related skills and behaviors to assist new chief executives with both the immediate knowledge and the long-term skills needed in the areas of leadership, personnel, strategic planning, staff safety, collaboration, fiscal resources, and other organizational development issues.
Training Opportunity
Orientation for New Pretrial Executives
Register Before: December 15, 2014
(Begins February 09, 2015) Extensive training that enhances the effectiveness of pretrial executives in maintaining and capitalizing existing services.
Training Opportunity
Executive Manager Program in Correctional Health Care
Register Before: December 01, 2014
(Begins January 06, 2015) The goal of this new training is to develop a better-prepared correctional senior-level workforce that is knowledgeable in health care administration. Training topics include: Government regulatory standards; Constitutional requirements and ethics; Strategic planning; Quality improvement; Workforce development; Finances; Contracts; Administration of health care; Mental health, Dental health, Custody needs to know; Keystone/Capstone case.
Training Opportunity
Executive Manager Program in Correctional Health Care
Register Before: December 01, 2014
(Begins February 23, 2015) The goal of this new training is to develop a better-prepared correctional senior-level workforce that is knowledgeable in health care administration. Training topics include: Government regulatory standards; Constitutional requirements and ethics; Strategic planning; Quality improvement; Workforce development; Finances; Contracts; Administration of health care; Mental health, Dental health, Custody needs to know; Keystone/Capstone case.
Training Opportunity
Planning of New Institutions
Register Before: November 21, 2014
(Begins February 23, 2015) This 32-hour training program teaches the importance of in-depth planning before starting facility design.
Training Opportunity
Orientation for Parole Board Chairs
Register Before: September 30, 2014
(Begins October 15, 2014) Parole board chairs, whether appointed by their governor, elected by their peers, or rotated into their role from their seat on the parole board, are in an influential position to lead efforts to improve and reform the transition and reentry system, as well as enhance their board’s capacity to use evidence-based principles in effective offender management. Being an effective chair requires clearly defined roles and strategies to ensure that informed decisions are made relative to the release and return of offenders.
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