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Recently found corrections resources available online.
New in the Library
Use of Electronic Control Weapon on a Person Suffering from Delirium or Other Agitated Condition
Posted: 16 hrs ago
(2015) "This two-part article focuses on litigation involving the use of Tasers on persons suffering from “excited delirium” or other agitated conditions – including cases involving a death, a non-fatal injury, or taking place in a correctional setting. The second part of this article … offers suggestions for policies and practices plus a listing of relevant resources and references on the subject" (p. 101). Part 1 is comprised of sections covering: what excited delirium (ED); and cases involving deaths—cases finding actual or potential liability, and cases finding no liability. Part 2 has sections about: cases involving non-fatal injury; correctional setting; and some suggestions to consider.
New in the Library
"Seek, Test, Treat and Retain" For Hepatitis C in the United States Criminal Justice System
Posted: 16 hrs ago
(2014) The potential benefits and challenges of applying “seek, test, treat and retain” (STTR) model of care to hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the US criminal justice system is examined. Sections of this article cover: seek—the potential of criminal justice populations for case findings; test—expanding HCV testing through opt-out screening; treat—implications of emerging HCV therapies for correctional settings; retain—ensuring adherence during and after incarceration; and challenges to HCV STTR in the criminal justice system, directions for future research, and conclusions. "The burden of morbidity and mortality associated with chronic HCV infection in the USA is increasing and without significantly increased treatment uptake, will likely continue to do so for several decades. The authors argue that the US criminal justice system is an ideal focus for HCV case finding and treatment due to a high prevalence of infection and large volume of individuals in contact with this system. STTR would identify large numbers of HCV infections, leading to opportunities for secondary prevention and primary care. Important challenges to the implementation of STTR include treatment costs and training of prison medical providers" (p. 164).
New in the Library
Jail Administration [Participants' Manual]
Posted: 6 days ago
(2012) This 36-hour program focuses on the basic skills and competencies jail administrators need to effectively meet this responsibility. The program covers ten key elements in jail administration: managing risk; using jail standards to establish and assess operations; developing and assessing policy and procedure; determining staffing needs; managing the workforce; managing inmate behavior; managing the budget; developing a fire, safety, and sanitation plan; assessing operations; and working with key stakeholders external to the jail. Includes the Action Plan Workbook.
New in the Library
Council of Juvenile Correctional Administrators Toolkit: Reducing the Use of Isolation
Posted: 1 week ago
(2015) "A response to behavioral problems in many facilities has been reliance on isolation for acting out youths who are mentally challenged, chronically violent, or gang involved. Instead of being used as a last resort to protect youths from self-harm, hurting others or causing significant property damage that is terminated as soon as a youth regains control, isolation too often becomes the behavior management system by default. Research has made clear that isolating youths for long periods of time or as a consequence for negative behavior undermines the rehabilitative goals of youth corrections … CJCA presents this Toolkit to help its members and the field reduce the use of isolation and ultimately better help youths in juvenile facilities become successful members of the community" (p. 5). Sections comprising this Toolkit are: introduction; overview of the issues of isolation and how it is defined; a summary of the research substantiating the negative impacts of isolation; how solitary confinement harms children; CJCA position in the use of isolation; five steps to reduce the use of isolation; conclusion and action steps for juvenile agency administrators; tips from agency directors that have reduced the use of isolation; examples from states that have reduced the use of isolation—Massachusetts, Maine, Indiana, and Alaska; and a statement from the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) regarding solitary confinement.
New in the Library
Information Sharing Tool Kit – Second Edition
Posted: 1 week ago
(2015) "[I]t is sometimes difficult for stakeholders, who represent different interests in the system, to come to agreement as to key issues with respect to information sharing for individual case management. These include the purposes and value to youth of information sharing; what are the appropriate limits on sharing; and how to minimize the potential negative collateral consequences of information sharing such as self-incrimination and net widening. In addition, with respect to data collection, aggregation and sharing for law, policy and program development, stakeholders in jurisdictions often make the mistake of developing systems before identifying the key questions they want answered by the aggregated data. Similarly, with respect to program evaluation and performance measurement, stakeholders must first determine the outcomes they wish to achieve and the indicators they will use to measure progress towards those outcomes, and then take their baseline measurements. Without this preliminary legwork, jurisdictions could set up information sharing systems that do not fully meet their needs." The Models for Change Information Sharing Tool Kit – 2d Edition is "is designed to assist jurisdictions in implementing information and data sharing initiatives in support of juvenile justice reform initiatives. Three distinct levels of categories of information sharing make up the Tool Kit’s Framework": "Category One: Information Sharing for Purposes of Individual Case Planning and Decision-making"; "Category Two: Data Collection and Sharing for Law, Policy, and Program Development; and "Category Three: Data Collection and Sharing for Performance Measurement and Program Evaluation;". Each category contains these sections: federal law overview; state law; interactive scenarios—sets of questions for testing ones knowledge about information/data sharing with accompanying answer keys; principles—"a set of core principles or positive values that should undergrid all information/data collection and sharing projects"; guidelines—a step-by-step process for developing and implementing such a project including related tools that can be used in the guidelines establishment; and case studies.
New in the Library
Offender Workforce Development Specialist (OWDS)
Posted: 1 week ago
(2015) A wealth of links to information about Offender Workforce Development Specialist (OWDS) can be found on this website. Links are organized to the following sections: OWDS Introduction Module from the National Institute of Corrections; OWDS Resource Directory; Job Club resources; job readiness resources; employment related assessments; multimedia materials; employment retention resources; employment interviewing resources; OWDS curriculum; Resource Room information; OWDS basic skills; OWDS Guide for Offenders; and juvenile corrections resources.
New in the Library
Trends in Pretrial Release: State Legislation
Posted: 1 week ago
(2015) "State laws provide a framework for judges and other local officials to determine who is eligible for [pretrial] release and under what conditions. In recent years, state legislation has concentrated largely on individualizing the pretrial process by focusing on specific defendants or offense categories. From 2012 to 2014, 261 new laws in 47 states addressed pretrial policy" (p. 1). This document provides an overview of these legislative enactments. Sections cover pretrial legislation by: risk assessments; victim-specific procedures; victim-specific conditions; pretrial services; and diversion. A chart shows types of release conditions enacted, with states listed in columns according to financial, substance related, electronic monitoring, victim protection, and other conditions. There is also a circle chart showing the types of diversion programs addressed by states—drug, mental health, veteran, non-population specific, human trafficking, and property crimes.
New in the Library
Profiles in Probation Revocation: Examining the Legal Framework in 21 States
Posted: 1 week ago
(2015) "This report compiles—in a convenient format—the results of a yearlong research project on the laws relating to probation revocation in 21 American states. By leafing through the four-page “legal profiles” presented in this volume, readers can easily see how much variation exists in statewide laws of probation and probation revocation, while zeroing in on issues of greatest interest. Whether a reader’s jurisdiction is included in the report’s 21 states or not, the legal profiles contain a wealth of information that will allow for comparison with one’s own system. We think every reader—no matter how experienced in the field—will come across practices or ideas in this study that they never heard of before" (p. 3). Individual state profiles are provided for Alabama, Arizona, California, Colorado, Florida, Indiana, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Mississippi, Missouri, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, Utah, Washington, and Wisconsin, and the Model Penal Code (MPC) of 2014. Each profile contains the following information about each state's probation system and revocation process: probation's definition and purpose, probation rate (per 1000,000) and rank (out of 50), forms of probation, term, early termination, supervision, conditions, modification of conditions, extension of probation term, interesting fact, grounds for probation revocation, revocation procedures, grades of offenses, legal standard for revocation, revocation and lesser sanctions, and appeal.
New in the Library
Solitary Confinement: Common Misconceptions and Emerging Safe Alternatives
Posted: 1 week ago
(2015) "Segregated housing, commonly known as solitary confinement, is increasingly being recognized in the United States as a human rights issue. While the precise number of people held in segregated housing on any given day is not known with any certainty, estimates run to more than 80,000 in state and federal prisons—which is surely an undercount as these do not include people held in solitary confinement in jails, military facilities, immigration detention centers, or juvenile justice facilities. Evidence mounts that the practice produces many unwanted and harmful outcomes—for the mental and physical health of those placed in isolation, for the public safety of the communities to which most will return, and for the corrections budgets of jurisdictions that rely on it for facility safety. Yet solitary confinement remains a mainstay of prison management and control in the U.S. largely because many policymakers, corrections officials, and members of the general public still subscribe to some or all of the common misconceptions and misguided justifications addressed in this report." The most common misconceptions are corrected while describing some of the promising alternatives that reduce the use of solitary confinement. The ten misconceptions are: conditions in segregated housing are stark but not inhumane; segregated housing is reserved only for the most violent; segregated housing is used only as a last resort; segregated housing is used only for brief periods of time; the harmful effects of segregated housing are overstated and not well understood; segregated housing helps keep prisons and jails safer; segregated housing deters misbehavior and violence; segregated housing is the only way to protect the vulnerable; safe alternatives to segregated housing are expensive; and incarcerated people are rarely released directly to the community from segregated housing. Also included is a copy of the Washington State Department of Corrections "Prison Sanctioning Guidelines: Violation Categories and Range of Sanction Options" (current as of 5/7/15). The grid shows general and serious violation sanction options for the first offense, second offense, third offense, and the maximum ranges of sanction.
New in the Library
The Effects on Re-offending of Custodial vs. Non-custodial Sanctions: An Updated Systematic Review of the State of Knowledge
Posted: 1 week ago
(2015) "Throughout the Western World, community-based sanctions have become a popular and widely used alternative to custodial sentences. There have been many comparisons of rates of reconviction among former prisoners and those who have served any kind of community sanction. So far, the comparative effects on re-offending of custodial and non-custodial sanctions are largely unknown, due to many uncontrolled variables … The objective is to assess the relative effects of custodial sanctions (imprisonment) and non-custodial ("alternative" or "community") sanctions on re-offending" (p.8). This study shows that the majority of non-custodial sanctions reduce re-offending more than custodial sanctions.
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News
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Important corrections news and announcements.
Corrections News
New E-Course: Designing for Performance: What you Need to Know about Memory and Learning
Posted: 1 day ago
National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is now offering a one hour e-course focused on the relationship between memory and learning techniques that enhance learning in response to that relationship. When you finish this course, you will be able to explain the research-based rationale for why and when certain design elements should be incorporated into learning. Designing for Performance: What You Need to Know about Memory and Learning is available through the NIC Learning Center. This e-course is appropriate for training administrators, coordinators, and trainers from all types of correctional agencies who are responsible for managing the development and delivery of their agencies training. To access the course, please go to http://nic.learn.com and login or create an account if you don t already have one. Then, go to Catalog > E-Courses > Corrections Topics and click Designing for Performance: What You Need to Know about Memory and Learning to launch. Additional resources fro
Corrections News
Register Now for Medicaid Administrative Claiming and Targeted Case Management: Opportunities for Public Safety Webinar
Posted: 1 week ago
Introducing the third webinar in NIC s Health Reform and Public Safety series . . . Medicaid Administrative Claiming and Targeted Case Management: Opportunities for Public Safety (Building Service Delivery Capacity to Meet Demand) May 28th, 2015 Please note webinar start time/your time zone: 10:00 am-11:30am (PT), 11:00 am- 12:30pm (MT), 12:00pm 1:30pm (CT), 1:00-2:30pm (ET) Target Audience: Criminal Justice Professionals, Corrections Health Professionals, Community-based Providers Register at this link https://nic.webex.com/nic/onstage/g.php?d=710371980 t=a As mentioned in the NIC broadcast Health Reform and Public Safety: New Opportunities, Better Outcomes on June 18, 2014, NIC is pleased to offer the third in a series of follow-up webinars that will delve further into health reform issues in criminal justice and corrections settings. With the advent of Medicaid Expansion under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), numerous states have seen a large increase
Corrections News
New in the Library - Handbook on Women and Imprisonment
Posted: 1 week ago
From the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, this 2014 document, Handbook on Women and Imprisonment, focuses on female prisoners and guidance on the components of a gender-sensitive approach to prison management, taking into account the typical background of female prisoners and their special needs as women in prison . The handbook is divided into four chapters. Chapter 1 The Special Needs of Female Offenders: including gender-specific and health-care needs; safety in prison; accommodation and family contact; and post-release reintegration. Chapter 2 Management of Women s Prisons: such as gender-sensitive prison management; prisoner activities and programs; pregnant women and women with children in prison; and monitoring women s prisons. Chapter 3 Reducing the Female Prison Population by Reforming Legislation and Practice Suggested Measures. Chapter 4 Research, Planning, Evaluation, and Public Awareness-Raising. Access the full handbook ----------------------------
Corrections News
In the News: Richmond Participates in EBDM Phase V
Posted: 1 week ago
This recent article published in the Richmond City News announces the selection of the City of Richmond as one of six Virginia localities participating in NIC s Evidence-Based Decision Making (EBDM) Initiative Phase V. Richmond Department of Justice Services Joins Nationally Recognized Initiative describes the EBDM Initiative and EBDM framework, along with Richmond s goals for improving their local criminal justice system. From the article: In Richmond, we have worked diligently to confront the ineffectiveness and inefficiencies of the old jail default model, said Mayor Dwight C. Jones. This has resulted in a strong commitment to provide programs and interventions that are researched based and result driven. The City of Richmond s goal is to engage state and local partners in a process to conduct local-level cross-systems mapping to determine where points for intervention or diversion of individuals are needed; and identify decision points where treatment systems interact w
Corrections News
Recent Podcast Highlights Victims Services and Reentry
Posted: 1 week ago
Listen to this informative podcast, Crime Victims and Offender Reentry - National Institute of Corrections, from the Court Services and Offender Supervision Agency (CSOSA). Aired on May 7, 2015, this radio show focuses on promising programs throughout the country that are successfully integrating victims in the reentry process. The show also identifies resources and funding opportunities for jurisdictions wishing to improve victim services programming in their own areas. Guests of the show include Lorie Brisbin, Correctional Program Specialist at the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) and Anne Seymour, a national crime victim advocate. View or request a copy of the recent NIC broadcast: Offender Reentry: The Value of Victim Involvement Find more resources on victims services and reentry at: Post-Conviction Victim Service Providers
Corrections News
Upcoming Event - Promising and Innovative Practices for Children of Incarcerated Parents: Arrest through Pre-Adjudication
Posted: 2 weeks ago
Join the Urban Institute and National Institute of Corrections (NIC) for this live webinar, Promising and Innovative Practices for Children of Incarcerated Parents: Arrest through Pre-Adjudication, being held June 3rd from 12:30 to 5:00 PM ET. About the webinar: Nearly three million children under the age of 18 have a parent in jail or prison, and millions more have experienced their parents being arrested. Due to their parent s criminal justice involvement, a growing body of research indicates that these children often experience trauma, family disruption, and the loss of their primary caregiver, which can lead to financial hardship, residential instability, and an array of emotional and behavioral problems. In response, several community-based organizations and government agencies across the country have implemented programs and practices aimed at reducing this trauma and mitigating the potentially harmful outcomes associated with parental criminal justice involvement. Th
Corrections News
New in the Library - Trauma among Girls in the Juvenile Justice System
Posted: 2 weeks ago
From the National Child Traumatic Stress Network and the Juvenile Justice Consortium, this 2014 report examines the effect of trauma on girls involved in the juvenile justice system. Trauma among Girls in the Juvenile Justice System discusses why there are increasing numbers of girls in the juvenile justice system and documents the prevalence and potential consequences of trauma for girls. Highlights from the report: Girls now account for approximately 30 percent of the estimated 2.11 million juvenile arrests made each year, and on any given day more than 7,800 girls reside in detention or juvenile corrections facilities in the US (Puzzanchera Adams, 2011). Careful analyses of data on girls arrests suggest that the recent increase is not a function of girls gone wild but rather results from changes in mandatory sentencing and law enforcement policies: termed net-widening or up-criming . A widely replicated finding is that youth in the juvenile justice system have been e
Corrections News
Virtual Conference: New Directions in Corrections: Staff Wellness
Posted: 2 weeks ago
On June 10, 2015, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) will launch a national virtual conference on staff wellness titled New Directions in Corrections: Staff Wellness. Session topics will include using neuroscience to reduce stress, healing corrections, the organizational implications of boundary violations, creating a purpose-driven corrections career, corrections personnel suicide, and staff wellness. June 10, 2015: Eastern: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.; Central: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Mountain: 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.; Pacific: 7 a.m. to 12 p.m. There is no charge for registration. Register
Corrections News
New Publication: Moving Beyond Incarceration for Women in Massachusetts
Posted: 3 weeks ago
From the Wellesley Centers for Women, this 2015 Massachusetts Women s Justice Network (MWJN) Policy Brief is intended to help policy makers and others understand MWJN s concerns with the state s bail and pretrial practices for women and to ensure that they are addressed by current legislative and administrative efforts at pretrial reform. Moving Beyond Incarceration for Women in Massachusetts: The Necessity of Bail/Pretrial Reform provides data on bail and pretrial detention for women in Massachusetts along with some key characteristics of the women involved. Recommendations for improvements or adjustments to pretrial approaches for are provided. Pretrial detention data: The annual estimated number of women held in the Awaiting Trial Unit (ATU) increased from 3,075 in 2012 to 3,800 in 2014. In February 2014, 43% of the women imprisoned in MCI-Framingham were held pretrial compared to 36% in 2012. The overcrowding situation in the ATU was 439% over capacity. In 2012, 36% of th
Corrections News
Register Now: Girls Adjudicated as Adults
Posted: 3 weeks ago
Reserve a spot on your calendar on May 13, 2015 for the upcoming webinar, Girls Adjudicated as Adults, sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) and the National Council on Crime Delinquency (NCCD). About the webinar: Over the past three decades, states across the country passed legislation making it easier to move youth under 18 into the adult criminal justice system. Although not widely considered by practitioners, researchers and other related stakeholders, a growing proportion of youth prosecuted as adults are female. This webinar is an opportunity to learn more about the enabling legislation and practice; the challenges faced by adult correctional systems in ensuring safety, providing appropriate programming, staffing and training to a population with differing emotional, psychological, educational and vocational needs. Please join us and bring your questions and thoughts regarding this topic. Date: May 13, 2015 1:00-2:30 EST Register here (Detail
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Training
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Upcoming training, broadcasts, and e-learning opportunities.
Training Opportunity
Veterans Treatment Courts: A Second Chance for Vets Who Have Lost Their Way
Register Before: August 26, 2015
(Begins August 26, 2015) The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) will be conducting a three-hour live-streaming internet broadcast on justice-involved veterans, highlighting the lifesaving role being played by veterans treatment courts across the country.
Training Opportunity
Orientation for Parole Board Chairs
Register Before: August 03, 2015
(Begins September 22, 2015) Parole board chairs, whether appointed by their governor, elected by their peers, or rotated into their role from their seat on the parole board, are in an influential position to lead efforts to improve and reform the transition and reentry system, as well as enhance their board’s capacity to use evidence-based principles in effective offender management. Being an effective chair requires clearly defined roles and strategies to ensure that informed decisions are made relative to the release and return of offenders.
Training Opportunity
Correctional Industries Director's Training
Register Before: July 24, 2015
(Begins September 22, 2015) Correctional Industries Director's Training. Correctional Industry Directors are called upon to provide dynamic and effective leadership which is a critical component in the success of any organization. Expanding leadership knowledge and enhancing leadership skills is the foundation for this training as it helps lay the groundwork for the complex work that must be done in this ever changing and challenging industry.
Training Opportunity
Managing Restrictive Housing Populations
Register Before: July 15, 2015
(Begins September 21, 2015) This 40-hour training program focuses on the management of Restrictive Housing populations within the control and jurisdiction of departments of corrections throughout the country. The program explores fundamental issues in programs that attempt to reintegrate violent offenders back into general populations which precludes releasing them directly from maximum confinement back to the community. The program also addresses legal issues surrounding restrictive housing, gang management, prison culture and climate, and classification of restrictive housing offenders.
Training Opportunity
Offender Employment Retention Specialist (OERS) Training
Register Before: June 26, 2015
(Begins August 24, 2015) The OERS training combines motivational interviewing techniques with cognitive behavioral principles to teach practitioners how to increase the offenders’ motivation for change while addressing the thoughts and feelings that negatively impact employment retention and successful reentry.
Training Opportunity
Large Jail Network Meeting
Register Before: June 19, 2015
(Begins September 27, 2015) The goals of the Large Jail Network are to explore issues facing jail systems from the perspectives of network members with administrative responsibility and to discuss strategies and resources for dealing successfully with these issues.
Training Opportunity
Jail Administration
Register Before: June 19, 2015
(Begins July 27, 2015) Jail administrators have significant responsibility and liability in ensuring that jail operations are conducted safely, securely, legally, and humanely. This 36-hour program focuses on the basic skills and competencies jail administrators need to effectively meet this responsibility.
Training Opportunity
Executive Training for New Wardens
Register Before: June 18, 2015
(Begins September 21, 2015) This 36 hour program helps participants enhance their skills in areas essential to effective leadership and administration of a correctional institution.
Training Opportunity
Conducting Security Audits
Register Before: June 16, 2015
(Begins September 14, 2015) With NIC’s hands-on, onsite training, gain the experience of auditing out-of-state institutions of various security levels and missions. This 36-hour training program supplements classroom instruction in auditing protocol with tours of assigned facilities and real-world assignments that put newly trained participants in charge of the auditing process.
Training Opportunity
Women Offenders: Developing an Agencywide Approach
Register Before: June 13, 2015
(Begins August 11, 2015) This revised blended learning program, with combined independent and on-site activities will total approximately 40 hours over the course of a year. Incorporated into the course requirements are Blended-learning activities to include a webinar, an organizational readiness survey, independent reading and personalized coaching throughout the year to assist agencies in directing their planned change. On-site activities include a 2.5 day, in-class training at the National Corrections Academy in Aurora, Colorado.
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