U.S. Department of Justice
Library
Subscribe: Subscribe to email alerts  |  Subscribe to RSS
Recently found corrections resources available online.
New in the Library
Holidays Are Dangerous Times Within Correctional Facilities
Posted: 3 hrs ago
(2014) This is essential reading for anyone working within a correctional setting. "In today’s world, criminal justice personnel not only have the “Dangers and Challenges” that are normally associated with the “Holidays”, they now have to factor in the possibility of terrorist activities directed at them and their facilities" (p. 1). Sections offer clear explanations for the following crucial preparations: correctional law enforcement and court facilities should be extra vigilant at the perimeters of their facilities; correctional facilities need to be extra cautious during visiting hours throughout the holiday season; law enforcement and sheriff’s patrol units need to be extremely attentive to their surroundings by increasing their own situational awareness; and offender security issues.
New in the Library
Summaries of Research from Justice Research and Policy
Posted: 4 hrs ago
(2013) The following reviews are provided: "Incorporating Supervision Terms and Timing of Arrests into Parolee Recidivism Rates"; "NIBRS Reliability in Reporting of Substance Use in Intimate Partner Violence"; and "Student Bullying Victimization and Reporting Behavior". Each review addresses why the study was done, what the study did, what the study found, and what the implications of the findings are for policy making.
New in the Library
Assessing Pretrial Risk without a Defendant Interview
Posted: 4 hrs ago
(2013) "Although the use of pretrial risk assessments has increased in recent years, the proportion of jurisdictions employing these instruments remains low, and is estimated to be no more than 10%. This low adoption rate is due in large part to the fact that existing risk assessments require that information be collected through interviews with defendants. Conducting these interviews and verifying the information is a time-consuming and resource-intensive process that many jurisdictions cannot afford" (p. 3). There were only eight multi-jurisdictional pretrial risk-assessments being used in 2012, all of which depended on defendant interviews. The foundation for an effective non-interview-based risk assessment was the Kentucky Pretrial Risk Assessment (KPRA), an objective instrument comprised of 12 risk factors, some of which were interview-based. The validated assessment was the KPRA-S, a seven risk factor assessment. The KPRA-S was found to accurately determine low-, moderate-, and high-risk defendants. The assessment was also found to predict those individuals prone to fail to appear (FTA) or commit new criminal activity (NCA) as well as the KPRA.
New in the Library
Why Did the U.S. Lock Up these Women with Men? A Fusion Investigation
Posted: 1 day ago
(2014) "The United States has long been a haven for those fleeing persecution and oppression. But today, the treatment for asylum seekers can be so terrible that some are asking to be sent back to the very countries they were escaping. This includes women who are locked up alongside men, sometimes the very men they were trying to escape … This is life for transgender women in U.S. immigration detention facilities … A six-month Fusion investigation found that conditions for transgender women locked up by Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) are often humiliating, dangerous, and even deadly … What makes ICE detainees different from prisoners is that they aren’t behind bars serving criminal sentences. Rather, they are locked up, waiting to see a judge who will decide whether or not they’ll be deported. A growing number of state and federal prisons across the country allow for transgender individuals to be housed based on their gender identity, regardless of their genitalia or sex at birth." Some of the sobering facts about transgender people under ICE detention are: on average, 75 transgender detainees are locked up each night—10% transgender men and 90% transgender women; of every 500 individuals, 1 detainee is transgender; of every 5 victims of confirmed sexual abuse, 1 victim is transgender. This report discusses: the housing of transgender detainees—transgender women not being housed with the female population; targets for prison rape during ICE detention; the detention-bed mandate of 2009; denial of needed medication; and alternative to detention.
New in the Library
Toward Evidence-Based Decision Making in Community Corrections: Research and Strategies for Successful Implementation
Posted: 1 day ago
(2013) This publication "contains invited articles on community corrections, with special emphasis on successful implementation strategies. A common thread that runs through these articles relates to what is needed to better ensure fidelity to evidence-based practices in community supervision and treatment. The research and implementation strategies shared by the authors should provide greater guidance to agency and program administrators working to assimilate evidence-based practices into their organizations" (p. 1). Articles include: "Current Practice and Challenges in Evidence-Based Community Corrections" by Stephen M. Haas; "STICS: From Pilot Project to Wide-Scale Implementation" - review; "Motivational Interviewing Proficiency in Corrections" – review; "Ohio Youth Assessment System – Creation, Validation, and Implementation" – review; "Actuarial Risk/Need Assessment and Its Effect on Supervision Revocation" – review; and "Establishing the Proper Risk-Dosage Relationship" – review. Each review explains: why the study was done; what the program was and what the researchers did; what the researchers found; and what the implications are of the study for policy making. Also included are two review essays. "Review Essay: Implementing EBP in Community Corrections" discusses what works, EBP models, planned change, and dosage. "Review Essay: Moving Implementation of EBP Forward" looks at three challenges to implementing EBPs in community corrections programming.
New in the Library
OJJDP Model Programs Guide
Posted: 1 day ago
(2014) "The Model Programs Guide [MPG] is intended to be a central, reliable, and credible resource to help practitioners and policymakers understand what works in juvenile justice-related programs and practices. Its purpose is to assist in practical decision making and program implementation by gathering information on specific juvenile justice-related programs and reviewing the existing evaluation research against standard criteria … Model Programs Guide (MPG) uses expert study reviewers and CrimeSolutions.gov's program review process, scoring instrument, and evidence ratings. The two sites also share a common program database." There are three evidence ratings in the MPG—effective, promising, or no effect. Points of entry are: youth programs at a glance; about the MPG; recently posted programs; resources—a huge range of literature reviews, related links, publications, glossary, FAQs, and contact MPG; MPG programs by topic; and all MPG programs. MPG program topical areas are: Child Protection, Health, and Welfare; Children Exposed to Violence and Victimization; Delinquency Prevention; Detention, Confinement, and Supervision; Juvenile Justice System and JJDPA [Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Act]; Juvenile and Family Courts; Law Enforcement; Populations; Schools; and Youth Offenders.
New in the Library
Youth Who Commit Sex Offenses: Research Update
Posted: 2 days ago
(2014) "Popular policy responses to youth who commit sex offenses, like listing them on sex offender registries, are largely based on misconceptions about why youth commit such offenses and how best to address their behavior. In fact, registries required by laws like the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act (SORNA) not only fail to protect child welfare and overall public safety, but actually jeopardize it, while taking an enormous toll on the youth who have offended. Fortunately, new research sheds light on why youth commit sex offenses and how to achieve the best outcomes for those they have harmed, the public, and the youth themselves" (p. 1). Sections explain: youth who commit sex offenses are still young people in development; most youth who commit sex offenses will never recidivate—the recidivism rate is 4%; youth who commit sex offense are not a special group; and youth who commit sex offenses respond well to treatment.
New in the Library
Perils of Registering Youth Who Commit Sex Offenses: Research Update
Posted: 2 days ago
(2014) "Despite being among the most widely used law enforcement tools in the U.S., registries and notification laws for people who commit sex offenses offer no clear public safety benefits—only a false sense of security. This makes it especially troubling that we subject youth to their many restrictions, which can have crippling consequences that last a lifetime. Though registration is not an effective way to reduce sex offending among adults and youth alike, it is an especially inappropriate response to youth, who are highly unlikely to become repeat sex offenders" (p. 1). Sections explain: registration and notification offer no clear public safety benefits; creating and maintaining registries is expensive; and registration harms youth and their families—registration causes psychological harm, prevents youth from participating in school and work, negatively impacts the families of youth who offend, and places youth at risk of victimization.
New in the Library
Sex Offender Management Assessment and Planning Initiative
Posted: 2 days ago
(2014) Those people looking for a primer on what is currently known about sex offending and sex offender management need to read this report. "Perpetrators of sex crimes are often seen as needing special management practices. As a result, jurisdictions across the country have implemented laws and policies that focus specifically on sex offenders, often with extensive public support. At the same time, the criminal justice community has increasingly recognized that crime control and prevention strategies—including those targeting sex offenders—are far more likely to work when they are based on scientific evidence. Recognizing the important role scientific evidence plays, the SMART Office developed the Sex Offender Management Assessment and Planning Initiative (SOMAPI), a project designed to assess the state of research and practice in sex offender management. Recommendations stemming from SOMAPI informed this report" (p. 1). This report is divided into two sections following a very thorough executive summary. Adult Section: incidence and prevalence of sexual offending; etiology of adult sexual offending; sex offender typologies; internet-facilitated sexual offending; adult sex offender recidivism; sex offender risk assessment; effectiveness of treatment of adult sex offenders; and sex offender management strategies. Juvenile Section: unique considerations regarding juveniles who commit sexual offenses; etiology and typologies; recidivism of juveniles who commit sexual offenses; assessment of risk for sexual reoffense; effectiveness of treatment; and registration and notification of juveniles who commit sexual offenses.
New in the Library
SMART: Office of Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering, and Tracking
Posted: 2 days ago
(2014) Looking for a portal to a wealth of information about sex offending and sex offender management? Then this website is a must. It is home to the Office of Sex Offender Sentencing, Monitoring, Apprehending, Registering, and Tracking (SMART). "The SMART Office was authorized in the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety Act of 2006, which was signed into law on July 27, 2006. The responsibilities of the SMART Office include providing jurisdictions with guidance regarding the implementation of the Adam Walsh Act, and providing technical assistance to the states, territories, Indian tribes, local governments, and to public and private organizations. The SMART Office also tracks important legislative and legal developments related to sex offenders and administers grant programs related to the registration, notification, and management of sex offenders." Access is provided to: about SMART; SORNA (Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act); Indian Country; legislative history; case law updates; funding opportunities; National Symposium; tools and resources—SORNA tools, education and prevention, newsletters and publications, press releases, and links; newsroom; and the National Sex Offender Public Website (NSOPW).
Browse the Library
News
Subscribe: Subscribe to RSS feed  | Subscribe to RSS
Important corrections news and announcements.
Corrections News
Join the Webinar: Safeguarding Children of Arrested Parents during Investigative and Tactical Operations
Posted: 8 hrs ago
Participate in this free webinar, Safeguarding Children of Arrested Parents during Investigative and Tactical Operations, hosted by International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) and in collaboration with the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA). Panelists will discuss the potential risks to children of arrested parents during investigative and tactical operations, and will provide strategies and best practice recommendations for law enforcement to mitigate these risks. Resources will be provided to assist law enforcement agencies in developing and implementing a policy to safeguard children during these operations. Presentations will include: An overview of the impact of parental arrests on children, whether or not they are present at the time of arrest A discussion of the development and implementation of model protocols to protect children during investigative and tactical operations Tips and tactics to use during field operations to reduce trauma to children of ar
Corrections News
Infographic: Most States Cut Imprisonment and Crime
Posted: 2 days ago
The PEW Charitable Trusts recently released an infographic comparing changes in the imprisonment rate and crime rate by state over the last five years. As the data shows, although the relationship between incarceration and crime is complex, states can reduce both at the same time. Highlighted statistics: In the 33 states where imprisonment rates decreased, crime rates fell an average of 13% In the 17 states where imprisonment rates increased, crime rates fell an average of 11% Full article on infographic
Corrections News
PRC Webinars December 2014
Posted: 8 days ago
The National PREA Resource Center (PRC), operated by the National Council on Crime and Delinquency through a cooperative agreement with the Bureau of Justice Assistance recently announced these items and events for December 2014. Check the the PRC website for the most up-to-date information. All are free to attend. From the PRC Website: Upcoming Webinars/Presentations Understanding LGBTI Inmates and Residents Tuesday, December 9, 2014 (3:00–4:30 p.m. EST)) Click here to learn more. Click here to register. Meeting the Youthful Inmate Standard: Implications for Operations, Promising Practices, and the Law Tuesday, December 16, 2014 (2:00–3:30 p.m. EST) Click here to learn more. Click here to register. For additional resources from NIC PREA/Offender Sexual Abuse
Corrections News
Apply Now: Women's Addiction Services Leadership Institute
Posted: 8 days ago
The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is looking for candidates for the fourth national Women’s Addiction Services Leadership Institute (WASLI). The 2015 WASLI is focused on emerging leaders in women s behavioral health (treatment and prevention). It offers the resources, tools, and inspiration needed by tomorrow s leaders as they continue to grow and develop quality services for women across the United States. The 2015 WASLI associates will be selected through a competitive application process. SAMHSA CSAT sponsors WASLI and covers the following costs for Associates: program materials two in-person training programs, including airfare and lodging costs individualized assessments monthly calls using a toll-free teleconference line. Associates will be responsible for covering the costs of ground transportation, food, baggage fees, and incidentals during their travel. Applications must be received by December 8, 2014. Apply to become a
Corrections News
In the News: Stop Putting Women in Jail
Posted: 8 days ago
A recent article published in The Washington Post discusses the movement in Britain to close women’s prisons and applies that rationale to women’s incarceration in the United States. We should stop putting women in jail. For anything highlights the current state of women’s incarceration and possible alternatives through community interventions. From the article: Women’s incarceration has risen by 646 percent in the past 30 years. The majority are nonviolent offenders with poor education, little employment experience and multiple histories of abuse from childhood through adulthood. Efforts to make prison “work” for women have only perpetuated the growth of the prison industrial complex. State-funded Project Redeploy in Illinois has built upon the evidence that nonviolent offenders are more effectively treated in their communities by diverting 1,376 nonviolent offenders from prison since January 2011, when the program began, through the end of 2013. Read the full article
Corrections News
In the News: Improvements at Tutwiler Prison for Women
Posted: 16 days ago
A recent article published in AL.com, an Alabama online news service, outlines how Alabama prison officials and a national consulting firm, the Moss Group, are making significant improvements at the Julia Tutwiler Prison for Women. 6 months into consultants work at Tutwiler prison: What s finished? What else is planned? highlights accomplishments over the last six months at the prison and what is expected to occur over the next year. Example projects completed, in progress and upcoming: Completed: More than 300 cameras now monitor the prison 24/7. Completed: More women are becoming correctional officers. In progress: Staff and supervisors are learning how to interact with female offenders. Upcoming: Review process for investigating prisoner complaints. Upcoming: PREA coordinators training. Read the full article ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ This announcement is available at NIC s Gender-Respon
Corrections News
Upcoming Webinar - Justice-Involved Women: Understanding Trauma and Violence
Posted: 16 days ago
This free webinar, Justice-Involved Women: Understanding Trauma and Violence, is hosted by the National Clearinghouse for the Defense of Battered Women and will focus on women who have experienced or perpetrated interpersonal and domestic violence. The webinar will also introduce a new evidence-based curriculum, Beyond Violence, which is designed for women who are in the criminal justice system with histories of aggression and/or violence. Presenter: Stephanie Covington, PhD, LCSW, Center for Gender and Justice Date/Time: Wednesday, November 12th 3-4:30 PM ET Register here ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ This announcement is available at NIC s Gender-Responsive News for Women and Girls. Feel free to forward to friends and colleagues. Subscribe to the newsletter at http://nicic.gov/go/subscribe. For additional resources on Justice-Involved Women go to NIC’s Women Offenders.
Corrections News
New from NIC: Fundamentals of Bail
Posted: 21 days ago
The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) has partnered with Tim Schnacke from the Center for Legal and Evidence-Based Practices to produce a new publication titled, Fundamentals of Bail: A Resource Guide for Pretrial Practitioners and a Framework for American Pretrial Reform, part of a series of papers dealing with acute criminal pretrial issues. This paper, which summarizes (1) why America needs pretrial justice, (2) the history of bail, (3) the legal foundations of the pretrial phase of a criminal case, (4) the pretrial research, (5) the national standards, and (6) terms and phrases used at bail, is unique in the field and is designed to provide anyone interested in pretrial justice (from criminal justice line-staff to governors, legislators, and justices on the supreme court) a broad overview of the issues facing America in this generation of bail reform as well as rational solutions to those issues so that this generation will potentially be America’s last. Like the title s
Corrections News
New from NIC: Money as a Criminal Justice Stakeholder
Posted: 21 days ago
The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) has partnered with Tim Schnacke from the Center for Legal and Evidence-Based Practices to produce a new publication titled, Money as a Criminal Justice Stakeholder: The Judge’s Decision to Release or Detain a Defendant Pretrial, part of a series of papers dealing with acute criminal pretrial issues. This paper provides an in-depth discussion of arguably the most important part of the criminal pretrial process – the judge’s release or detain decision – and how America’s overuse of secured money at bail tends to hinder or derail that decision, leading to our current crisis of both unintended detention and release. The paper discusses the proper decision-making process in light of the history of bail and the law intertwined with that history, holds up the current process to the national pretrial best-practice standards, and shows how recent empirical pretrial research can be used by judges to make definitive “in-or-out” decisions, immediate
Corrections News
In the News: Washington State’s Gender Responsive Approach
Posted: 22 days ago
A recent article published in The Seattle Times outlines the steps Washington State has been taking to adapt to the needs of a larger women’s prison population. Women behind bars: State takes a new approach highlights how the Washington State prison system has embraced a decade-long University of Cincinnati study into every aspect of female felons’ lives to create a “Gender Responsiveness Action Plan.” Under the Gender Responsiveness Action Plan: Female offenders can attend seminars focusing on healthy relationships, safety awareness, health and nutrition, handling anger and stress, and goal setting. Inmates can also mentor others and offer a friendly ear to other women in need. Staff at the women’s prison have been undergoing training in gender issues, with education focusing on the past trauma female inmates have suffered. DOC officials are also reviewing their methods of classifying female inmates for housing and labeling their risk to reoffend. -------------------
Older News
Training
Subscribe: Subscribe to RSS  | Subscribe this calendar (iCal)  | View calendar of events  
Upcoming training, broadcasts, and e-learning opportunities.
Training Opportunity
Correctional Industries Director's Training
Register Before: July 24, 2015
(Begins September 22, 2015) Correctional Industries Director's Training. Correctional Industry Directors are called upon to provide dynamic and effective leadership which is a critical component in the success of any organization. Expanding leadership knowledge and enhancing leadership skills is the foundation for this training as it helps lay the groundwork for the complex work that must be done in this ever changing and challenging industry.
Training Opportunity
Women Offenders: Developing an Agencywide Approach
Register Before: June 13, 2015
(Begins August 11, 2015) This revised blended learning program, with combined independent and on-site activities will total approximately 40 hours over the course of a year. Incorporated into the course requirements are Blended-learning activities to include a webinar, an organizational readiness survey, independent reading and personalized coaching throughout the year to assist agencies in directing their planned change. On-site activities include a 2.5 day, in-class training at the National Corrections Academy in Aurora, Colorado.
Training Opportunity
National Sheriffs' Institute
Register Before: May 29, 2015
(Begins August 30, 2015) The National Sheriffs' Institute (NSI), sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) and the National Sheriffs' Association (NSA), is designed to enhance your leadership skills as you take on the challenges of your first term as sheriff. It is the only executive leadership program designed specifically for first-term sheriffs. It was first developed and delivered in the early 1970s and has changed over the years to meet the evolving needs of first-term sheriffs. The program is held in Aurora, Colorado.
Training Opportunity
Executive Excellence Program
Register Before: March 31, 2015
(Begins May 31, 2015) This 10-month executive development program offers innovative learner-centered and competency-based training for future leaders of corrections agencies.
Training Opportunity
Offender Employment Retention Specialist (OERS) Training
Register Before: March 06, 2015
(Begins May 04, 2015) The OERS training combines motivational interviewing techniques with cognitive behavioral principles to teach practitioners how to increase the offenders’ motivation for change while addressing the thoughts and feelings that negatively impact employment retention and successful reentry.
Training Opportunity
Executive Manager Program in Correctional Health Care
Register Before: March 01, 2015
(Begins May 04, 2015) The goal of this new training is to develop a better-prepared correctional senior-level workforce that is knowledgeable in health care administration. Training topics include: Government regulatory standards; Constitutional requirements and ethics; Strategic planning; Quality improvement; Workforce development; Finances; Contracts; Administration of health care; Mental health, Dental health, Custody needs to know; Keystone/Capstone case.
Training Opportunity
Large Jail Administration
Register Before: February 27, 2015
(Begins May 31, 2015) Managing the operations of a large jail requires a unique set of tools and vision for daily operations that smaller jails cannot emulate. Recognizing the difference, NIC offers Large Jail Administration to address the specific needs of large jails. This 40-hour course focuses on assisting newly appointed jail administrators responsible for the oversight of a jail or jail system with 1,000 or more inmates.
Training Opportunity
Managing Restrictive Housing Populations
Register Before: February 01, 2015
(Begins March 23, 2015) This 40-hour training program focuses on the management of Restrictive Housing populations within the control and jurisdiction of departments of corrections throughout the country. The program explores fundamental issues in programs that attempt to reintegrate violent offenders back into general populations which precludes releasing them directly from maximum confinement back to the community. The program also addresses legal issues surrounding restrictive housing, gang management, prison culture and climate, and classification of restrictive housing offenders.
Training Opportunity
National Sheriffs' Institute
Register Before: January 09, 2015
(Begins April 12, 2015) The National Sheriffs' Institute (NSI), sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) and the National Sheriffs' Association (NSA), is designed to enhance your leadership skills as you take on the challenges of your first term as sheriff. It is the only executive leadership program designed specifically for first-term sheriffs. It was first developed and delivered in the early 1970s and has changed over the years to meet the evolving needs of first-term sheriffs. The program is held in Aurora, Colorado.
Training Opportunity
Executive Training for New Wardens
Register Before: January 02, 2015
(Begins April 06, 2015) This 36 hour program helps participants enhance their skills in areas essential to effective leadership and administration of a correctional institution.
Full Training Catalog
[+] feedback