U.S. Department of Justice

Evidence-Based Practices (EBPs) Resources

Publication year: 2015

Library ID

  • 029940

Other Information

  • 2015
"In the field of behavioral health, the term evidence-based practices (EBPs) refers to interventions that have been rigorously tested, have yielded consistent, replicable results, and have proven safe, beneficial, and effective for most people diagnosed with mental illness and substance use disorders … Identifying “what works” and applying the evidence-based knowledge to program development is critically important to the field to assure the use of best practices in behavioral health service provision. Too few people with serious mental illness and substance use disorders who are justice-involved receive comprehensive and appropriate services. The EBP initiative is intended to help close this treatment gap by promoting the use of EBPs with those that are justice-involved." Access is provided to a wide range of information resources including fact sheets, webinars, and a checklist.
EBP Fact Sheets include: "Forensic Assertive Community Treatment: Updating the Evidence" by Joseph P. Morrissey; "Supported Employment for Justice-Involved People with Mental Illness" by Gary Bond; "Illness Management and Recovery" by Kim Mueser; "Integrating Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services for Justice-Involved Persons with Co-Occurring Disorders" by Fred Osher; and "Reducing Criminal Recidivism for Justice-Involved Persons with Mental Illness: Risk/Needs/Responsivity and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions" by Merrill Rotter. Some additional fact sheets include: "Motivational Interviewing"; "Housing"; and "Trauma Specific Interventions".
A Five-Part EBP Webinar And Discussion Group Series comprised of: "Forensic Assertive Community Treatment: Updating the Evidence" by Joseph P. Morrissey and Ann-Marie Louison; "Supported Employment for Justice-Involved People with Mental Illness" by Gary Bond and Sarah Swanson; "Illness Management and Recovery" by Kim Mueser and Susan Gingerich; "Integrating Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services for Justice-Involved Persons with Co-Occurring Disorders" by Fred Osher and Ann-Marie Louison; and "Reducing Criminal Recidivism for Justice-Involved Persons with Mental Illness: Risk/Needs/Responsivity and Cognitive-Behavioral Interventions" by Merrill Rotter and Eric Olson.
Also provided is an "easy-to-use checklist to help behavioral health agencies assess their utilization of EBPs associated with positive public safety and public health outcomes" entitled "A Checklist for Implementing Evidence-Based Practices and Programs for Justice-Involved Adults with Behavioral Health Disorders".