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PREA Training & Resources

PREA e-courses, information and toolkits.


Resources Guide

The following are a list of "top-shelf" resources that have been hand-picked by our library team around this topic. If you would like additional research assistance on this topic, please contact our help desk. They have access to specialized databases and thousands of resources you won't find online. Click on a heading below to browse resources in that section.

*Training - 17 items(s)

Resources
National Institute of Corrections' Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Training Courses (2016). NIC offers the PREA courses at the NIC Learn Center here: https://nic.learn.com

The Learn Center is a full LMS, Learning Management System that will allow individuals to: create an account; start, stop a course and return to where they left off; and create and print a certificate upon successful completion of a course.

The purpose of offering these courses on a DVD is to accommodate an institution that does not have access to the Internet and therefore needs another method of providing the PREA courses to their staff. When possible, please use the Learn Center for a better experience.

These eight courses will assist agencies and staff in meeting the requirements of Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA). Courses contained on this data DVD are: "Audit Process and Instrument Overview" which will assist agencies in meeting the requirements of PREA Section 115.93; "Behavioral Health Care for Sexual Assault Victims in a Confinement Setting" which will assist agencies in meeting the requirements of PREA standard 115.35; "Communicating Effectively and Professionally with LGBTI Offenders" which will provide strategies for communicating respectfully with all adult offenders, with a specific focus on lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) offenders; "Coordinators' Roles and Responsibilities" which will provide agency PREA Coordinators with an overview of the basic role and responsibilities of their position; "Investigating Sexual Abuse in a Confinement Setting" which will assist agencies in meeting the requirements of PREA Section 115.34; "Medical Health Care for Sexual Assault Victims in a Confinement Setting" which will assist agencies in meeting the requirements of PREA Section 115.35; "PREA: Preventing and Addressing Sexual Abuse in Tribal Detention Facilities" which provides guidelines and practices that will help in preventing and addressing sexual abuse in your tribal detention facility; and "Your Role Responding to Sexual Assault" which is designed to enhance correctional professionals’ skills in responding to incidents and allegations of sexual abuse.
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PREA: What You Need to Know (2014). This resource is a must have for your agency! “The core goal of PREA: What You Need to Know is to teach inmates about their right to be free from sexual abuse and sexual harassment. The video gives an overview of corrections policies to prevent and respond to this abuse, covering how inmates can safely report abuse, the types of victim services available to inmates following an incident of sexual abuse, and what it means for a facility to have a “zero-tolerance” policy. Corrections agencies can use this video to implement the inmate education provision in the national Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) standards (§ 115.33, Inmate education; § 115.132, Detainee, contractor, and inmate worker notification of the agency's zero-tolerance policy). The video contains general information that is relevant to all types of prisons, jails, and lockups” (p. 1). [NOTE: Closed Captions (CC) only work using QuickTime Player.]

The Inmate Education Facilitator’s Guide to this video provides advice on how to present this video in the most effective manner to the offenders under your custody, and create inmate education materials specific to your agency and correctional facility. Topics discussed include: the importance of inmate education; the PREA standards; intake education; documenting inmate participation in education programs; ongoing inmate education; accessibility of information; and other options for customizing your video inmate education program. Appendixes provide: a glossary containing definitions to key terms; and a transcript of the video.

You can find a link to the English version with English subtitles
at http://media.wcl.american.edu/Mediasite/Play/28358cf4a99c4fa69227e013c52a2a5f1d, and the Spanish Version with Spanish subtitles at http://media.wcl.american.edu/Mediasite/Play/d6d8ed64fed141b6b8cccc5229a3abf51d.
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Specialized Training: Investigating Sexual Abuse in Confinement Settings (2013). This training program “is designed to address the requirements outlined in the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) standard 115.34/.134/.234/.334 requiring specialized training for individuals tasked with investigating alleged incidents of sexual abuse in confinement settings. Additionally, this curriculum contains the information fundamental to understanding the concepts required by PREA standard 115.34/.134/.234/.334 and best practice in investigating incidents of sexual abuse. Agencies with investigators who have extensive experience in investigating these and other types of allegations—such as law enforcement agencies—may want to review the curriculum for redundancy with other trainings.

“The curriculum is designed specifically for an audience of correctional investigators, although there is content within the curriculum that also would be beneficial to those who oversee investigations and those who act as first responders.

“The curriculum contains nine modules and includes content on PREA standards relating to investigations; case law demonstrating legal liability issues for agencies, facilities, and investigators to consider when working to eliminate sexual abuse and sexual harassment in confinement settings; proper use of Miranda and Garrity warnings; trauma and victim response; processes of a forensic medical exam; first-response best practices; evidence-collection best practices in a confinement setting; techniques for interviewing male, female, and juvenile alleged victims of sexual abuse and sexual harassment; report writing techniques; and information on what prosecutors consider when determining whether to prosecute sexual abuse cases.

“The nine modules and suggested training lengths are as follows: Introduction; Module 1: PREA Update and Standards Overview (1 hour 15 minutes); Module 2: Legal Issues and Liability (1 hour 15 minutes) and presentation slides; Module 3: Culture (1 hour, optional)
and presentation slides; Module 4: Trauma and Victim Response (1 hour) and presentation slides; Module 5: Medical and Mental Health Care (1 hour 30 minutes, optional) and presentation slides; Module 6: First Response and Evidence Collection (2 hours) and presentation slides; Module 7: Adult Interviewing Techniques (2 hours 15 minutes) and presentation slides; Module 7: Juvenile Interviewing Techniques (2 hours 15 minutes) and presentation slides; Module 8: Report Writing (30 minutes) and presentation slides; Module 9: Prosecutorial Collaboration (1 hour, optional) and presentation slides.

“In total, the provided training is two days in length, although three of the modules, as noted above, are “optional” in that they do not contain content required by the PREA standards. All of the modules are designed to be modified by each facility and agency to include agency-specific policy and practice guidance in addition to best practice.”
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Specialized Training: PREA Medical and Mental Care Standards (2013). “The intent of the curriculum is to provide prisons, jails, community confinement, and juvenile detention facilities with specialized training for medical and mental health personnel on specific aspects of Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA). Specifically, this curriculum provides training on how to detect and assess signs of sexual abuse, preserve physical evidence, and respond effectively and professionally to victims.

“The intended audience is health professionals. This includes but is not limited to physicians, psychologists, nurses, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, health administrators, social workers, and other professionals who provide, support, or administer health care services in correctional environments.

“The curriculum contains four modules and should take four hours to complete, including breaks and time for questions. All modules are considered essential: Facilitators guide; Introduction (10 minutes); Module 1: Detecting and Assessing Signs of Sexual Abuse and Harassment (55 minutes); Module 2: Reporting and the PREA Standards (50 minutes); Module 3: Effective and Professional Responses (30 minutes); [and] Module 4: The Medical Forensic Examination and Forensic Evidence Preservation (60 minutes).”
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Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Medical Health Care for Sexual Assault Victims in a Confinement Setting Course (2013). Welcome to the National Institute of Corrections’ Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Medical Health Care for Sexual Assault Victims in a Confinement Setting Course. The purpose of this course is to assist agencies in meeting the requirements of the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Section 115.35 “Specialized training: Medical and mental health care”. At the end of this course, you will be able to explain the PREA standards that relate to the provision of medical care for victims of sexual abuse. You will also be able to describe your role and responsibilities in providing this care.
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Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Coordinators’ Roles and Responsibilities Course (2013). Welcome to the National Institute of Corrections’ Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Coordinators’ Roles and Responsibilities Course. The main purpose of this course is to provide agency PREA Coordinators with an overview of the basic role and responsibilities of their position. At the end of this course, you’ll be able to: describe the general duties and responsibilities of an agency- wide PREA Coordinator; explain the policies, procedures, and practices needed to achieve PREA compliance; create an action plan for your agency that includes steps needed to achieve PREA compliance; and serve as the point-of-contact for information concerning PREA standards and the agency’s efforts toward PREA compliance.
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Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Investigating Sexual Abuse in a Confinement Setting Course (2013). Welcome to the National Institute of Corrections’ Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Investigating Sexual Abuse in a Confinement Setting Course. The main purpose of this course is to assist agencies in meeting the requirements of Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Section 115.34 “Specialized Training for Investigators”. At the end of this course, you will be able to explain the knowledge, components, and considerations that an investigator must use to perform a successful sexual abuse or sexual harassment investigation consistent with PREA standards.
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Curriculum: Investigating Allegations of Staff Sexual Misconduct with Offenders: Facilitator’s Guide [Lesson Plans] (2010). “Investigating Allegations of Staff Sexual Misconduct with Offenders is a 36-hour educational program that addresses the complex issues in investigations of staff on offender sexual abuse in correctional settings … The objectives of the training are to ensure that participants are able to: 1. Review the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (PREA) and identify its impact on investigations of staff sexual misconduct with persons under correctional supervision; 2. Understand a comprehensive approach to addressing and investigating allegations of staff sexual misconduct with offenders- - policy, training and operational practices; 3. Understand legal and investigative implications and strategies to responding to staff sexual misconduct with offenders; 4. Understand the role of the prosecutor and review the legal tools for prosecuting staff sexual misconduct with offenders–their content, importance and relevance to investigations; [and] 5. Demonstrate and model how integrated relationships between police, prosecutors, investigators, and correctional personnel can help to ensure successful investigations and convictions of staff sexual misconduct with persons under correctional supervision” (p. 11-12). Sections contained in this curriculum are: introduction; training agenda; teaching tips; welcome, introduction, and pre-test; lesson plans—Module 1 Training Objectives, Module 2 The Prison Rape Elimination Act update and overview, Module 3 State Laws and Investigations, Module 4 Agency Culture, Module 5 Action Planning, Module 6 Training for Investigators in a Correctional Setting, Module 7 Investigative Policy, Module 8 Operational Practices, Module 9 Investigative Techniques, Module 10 DNA and Medical Health Care, Module 11 Victimization and Mental Health Care, Module 12 Media Strategies, Module 13 Role of Prosecutors in Cases of Staff Sexual Misconduct, Module 14 Human Resource Issues in Investigation of Staff, and Module 15 Legal Liability and Investigations; wrap up; and an appendix including a sample pre-/post-test and a sample training evaluation.
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Investigating Allegations of Staff Sexual Misconduct with Inmates [Lesson Plans] (2000). A curriculum to address the needs of those who investigate allegations of staff sexual misconduct is presented. The following sections are contained in this manual: defining staff sexual misconduct and an overview of the national scope; legal considerations; institutional culture and staff/inmate dynamics; proactive investigative framework; responding to allegations; and activity booklet and action planning.
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PREA: Audit Process and Instrument Overview. The purpose of this course is to assist agencies in meeting the requirements of Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Section 115.93 Audits of standards. At the end of this course, you will be able to: 1) Explain the audit process; 2) Describe the components of the Audit Instrument; 3) Describe the duties and responsibilities of an auditor in the audit process; 4) Describe the duties and responsibilities of a PREA Coordinator/Compliance Manager in the audit process; and 5) Explain the activities associated with a corrective action period. Estimated duration: 3 hours.
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PREA: Preventing and Addressing Sexual Abuse in Tribal Detention Facilities. The National Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Standards were released in 2012 to provide comprehensive guidance on the prevention, detection, and response to sexual abuse and violence within confinement settings across the country. Although the National PREA Standards do not specifically extend to tribal detention facilities, all confinement facilities, regardless of their obligations under PREA, are being held to a higher legal standard for the prevention of and response to sexual abuse and could potentially face increased civil penalties if they fail to do so. This course was adapted from a course developed for the National PREA Resource Center in partnership with the American Probation and Parole Association, and will provide you with guidelines and practices that will help you to prevent and address sexual abuse in your tribal detention facility. Estimated duration: 3 hours.
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PREA: Behavioral Health Care for Sexual Assault Victims in a Confinement Setting. The main purpose of this course is to assist agencies in meeting the requirements of Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) standard 115.35 Specialized Training: Medical and Mental Health Care. At the end of this course, you’ll be able to explain the knowledge, components, and considerations that you must use to be effective in your role as a behavioral health care practitioner, consistent with PREA standards. Estimated duration: 3 hours.
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PREA: Your Role Responding to Sexual Abuse. This 2-hour e-course provides a comprehensive overview of the Federal Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) and is designed to increase participants’ understanding of the dynamics of sexual abuse among male inmates, female inmates and between staff and inmates. As a participant, you will learn how to effectively and appropriately respond when you first learn of an allegation of sexual abuse that may have occurred in your correctional facility. The interactive nature of the course’s “business cases” will enable you to practice and apply the skills you learn in a “real world” scenario.
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The National PREA Resource Center - Training & Technical Assistance. The Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA), which was signed into law by President George W. Bush on September 4, 2003, was created to eliminate sexual abuse in confinement. To learn more about the law and preparing for implementation, visit the PREA Essentials page.

In order to achieve its mission to eliminate sexual abuse in confinement facilities nationwide, the PREA Resource Center (PRC) has designed a four-pronged strategy for the development and delivery of training and technical assistance (TTA).
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PREA - Inmate Education Video in English.
American University, Washington College of Law
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PREA - Inmate Education Video in Spanish.
American University, Washington College of Law
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PREA - Spanish Video with Subtitles.
American University, Washington College of Law
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General - 15 items(s)

Resources
Untangling the PREA Standards: Outside Reporting, Confidential Support, and Third-Party Reporting Fact Sheet (2015). "In developing the PREA [Prison Rape Elimination Act] standards, the Department of Justice ensured that inmates/detainees/residents have multiple ways to report sexual abuse, and that they are able to access victim support services from outside agencies. The purpose of this fact sheet is to clarify the various external reporting methods that the standards require detention facilities to put in place, and that are separate from the internal reporting mechanisms described in the standard §115.51(a). This fact sheet aims to help facilities distinguish between external reporting, third-party reporting, and the provision of victim services, which each fulfills different but related requirements in the standards. In addition to clarifying the intent of the reporting standards, this factsheet contains three case studies to illustrate how these provisions apply in different corrections settings" (p. 1). The case studies cover adult female, adult male, and juvenile male.
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Using a Prevention, Trauma-Informed Framework when Implementing PREA (2015). "This video training series was designed to provide an important foundation for understanding trauma, the implications of trauma on the behaviors of inmates while in confinement, and how correctional administrators and practitioners can use this information to support successful PREA implementation and ultimately provide a safer environment for inmates and staff … Through considering the role that past and present trauma plays in building safe – and particularly sexually safe – environments, correctional administrators and staff training directors can support staff in efforts to more fully meet a facility’s mission and make everyone safer … the material contained in this video series will provide an opportunity for staff in confinement facilities to learn and be thoughtful about the benefits of a trauma-informed approach in correctional settings. " (p. 2). This training program contains five models and one documentary. Module One—An introduction to the Series. Using a Prevention, Trauma-Informed Framework when Implementing PREA (7 minutes): Andie Moss introduces you to need for understanding the role of trauma in implementing PREA. Module Two--What Is It Important To Understand Trauma When Implementing PREA? (15 minutes): Dr. Joan Gillece, a pioneer in implementing a trauma-informed approach, will explain what trauma is and how it influences PREA implementation. Module Three--Understanding the Neurobiological Effects of Trauma When implementing PREA (12 minutes): the neurobiological impact of trauma is explained by Dr. Brian Sims. Module Four--Implementing PREA Standards with a Trauma Focus (26 minutes): A panel of clinicians and practitioners from the Dorchester County Detention Center on Maryland’s Eastern, hosted by Andie Moss, provides examples on how to implement the PREA standards "through a trauma-informed lens in adult confinement settings … [these concepts are easily transferable to juvenile facilities". Module Five--Practical Solutions to Challenging Situations (10 minutes): The implementation of a trauma-informed approach in a jail is discussed by Alisha Salisbury, Warden Steve Mills, and PREA officer and investigator Lt. Robert Fitzgerald from the Dorchester County Detention Center. This "module will provide some creative examples for policymakers and practitioners to consider as they begin or continue to implement a trauma-informed approach". Healing Neen: Trauma and Recovery (25 minutes): this film shows how one woman benefited from trauma-informed care that helped her to take a journey from trauma, through the criminal justice system, to healing.
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PREA Essentials (2013). “The PREA Resource Center (PRC) designed this PREA [Prison Rape Elimination Act] Essentials Page to guide professionals in their implementation of specific standards; therefore, this page is organized by standards categories … Each category contains: (1) a brief synopsis summarizing the standards in that category, (2) links to an online version of those standards, (3) links to helpful resources related to those standards sorted by correctional facility type, and (4) where relevant, a discussion of some key issues raised by those particular standards. The issues and resources included here are not exhaustive, but rather offer a snapshot of those that may be of particular interest to practitioners working to comply with the standards.” The standards categories are: Prevention Planning; Responsive Planning; Training and Education; Screening for Risk of Sexual Victimization and Abusiveness; Reporting; Official Response Following an Inmate/Detainee/Resident Report; Investigations; Discipline; Medical and Mental Care; Data Collection and Review; Audits and State Compliance; Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans-gender, Intersex (LGBTI) and Gender-Nonconforming Inmates; and Culture Change.
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Cross-gender Searches: A Case Law Survey (2013). “Inmates and detainees retain a limited privacy right when detained in correctional settings, particularly in the context of cross-gender searches. Jurisdictions have approached the competing interests of privacy and cross-gender searches quite differently, finding liability for correctional officers, supervisors, and facilities under a variety of circumstances. These decisions are highly fact-sensitive, and the jurisprudence has evolved rapidly. This document provides an overview of cross-gender search cases in both state and federal courts, focusing on what types of conduct most often result in individual and supervisory liability.” Cases are organized into the 11 Circuits (with their corresponding states) and the D.C. Circuit. Citations are listed according to a successful inmate claim or a successful agency defense for female correctional staff/male inmate or male correctional staff/female inmate.
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Investigating Sexual Assaults in Correctional Facilities (2007). Problems with the investigation of sexual assaults (inmate on inmate sexual assault and staff sexual misconduct) in correctional facilities are discussed. Sections following an executive summary are: inmate-related issues in investigating sexual violence; staff barriers to investigations; investigating staff sexual misconduct; additional issues affecting investigations; outside factors; and conclusion.
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Prison Rape Elimination Act: Implications for Sheriffs: The Facts (2006). This brochure explains the impact of the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) on jails. Topics discussed include: what PREA is; how PREA applies to jails; the purpose of PREA; what jails need to be doing; and answers to frequently asked questions.
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NIC - What to do About PREA. "In late summer 2013, correctional agencies will experience the first audits on their compliance with the new Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) standards released by the U.S. Attorney General in August 2012. The PREA Standards are intended to provide guidance to correctional agencies for managing facilities that are safer and free from sexual coercion and harassment. Over the upcoming 3 years, each adult correctional facility and each residential facility for juvenile offenders can expect to undergo its first audit. Audits will be repeated on a 3-year cycle."
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The National PREA Resource Center - Library. "The PRC Library serves as a central repository for PREA-related resources and contains more than 700 entries. You can search for an entry by title, author, or keywords in the search bar above. Search results are also pre-sorted into categories below to help locate relevant documents. The PRC does not evaluate nor endorse the resources provided."
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The National PREA Resource Center - Posters. "These posters are intended to provide information on an individual’s right to report, how to report, and access to victim support services. The posters were created in a range of sizes and designed to allow facilities to modify them to make them facility-specific. Instructions for how to modify the template and how to print for best results are included."
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Report on Sexual Victimization in Prisons, Jails, and Juvenile Correctional Facilities (2016). "This Report presents the findings of the Review Panel on Prison Rape (Panel), along with its recommendations, that are the result of its 2014 hearings in Washington, District of Columbia, based on two national surveys of correctional facilities by the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS): Sexual Victimization in Prisons and Jails Reported by Inmates, 2011-12 (May 2013) and Sexual Victimization in Juvenile Facilities Reported by Youth, 2012 (June 2013). Under the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (PREA), the Panel is to hold annual public hearings, based on the data that BJS has collected from correctional facilities in three broad categories: (1) federal and state prisons, (2) jails, and (3) juvenile correctional facilities. In each of these three categories, the Panel is to solicit testimony on the operations of two correctional institutions with a low incidence of sexual victimization and three correctional institutions with a high incidence of sexual victimization. The purpose of the hearings is to identify the common characteristics of (1) sexual predators, (2) victims, (3) correctional institutions and systems with a low incidence of sexual victimization, and (4) correctional institutions and systems with a high incidence of sexual victimization."
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The Prison Rape Videos: Three Out of Four Stars (2015). "On Friday, the Marshall Project posted two prison orientation videos – one for incoming female inmates, one for incoming male inmates – which feature veteran inmates advising newcomers on how to avoid being raped. The videos are to be shown to new inmates in all prisons in the state of New York.The videos, currently available on The Marshall Project’s website, are startling. The tone is that of a welcome video, offering matter-of-fact, practical tips, while the subject is sexual violence."
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Push to End Prison Rapes Loses Earlier Momentum (2015). "After decades of societal indifference to prison rape, Congress, in a rare show of support for inmates’ rights, unanimously passed the Prison Rape Elimination Act in 2003, and Mr. Perry’s predecessor as governor, President George W. Bush, signed it into law.

“The emerging consensus was that ‘Don’t drop the soap’ jokes were no longer funny, and that rape is not a penalty we assign in sentencing,” said Jael Humphrey, a lawyer with Lambda Legal, a national group that represents Ms. Star in a federal lawsuit alleging that Texas officials failed to protect her from sexual victimization despite her persistent, well-documented pleas for help.

But over 12 years, even as reported sexual victimization in prisons remained high, the urgency behind that consensus dissipated. It took almost a decade for the Justice Department to issue the final standards on how to prevent, detect and respond to sexual abuse in custody. And it took a couple of years more before governors were required to report to Washington, which revealed that only New Jersey and New Hampshire were ready to certify full compliance."
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How PREA will affect corrections in 2015 (2014). "The subject of prison rape is no longer being avoided"
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Prison Rape Elimination Act Standards Finally in Effect, but Will They be Effective? (2013). ""Sexual abuse is not an inevitable feature of incarceration. Leadership matters because corrections administrators can create a culture within facilities that promotes safety instead of one that tolerates abuse." – National Prison Rape Elimination Commission"
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Information on Staff-Inmate Boundaries and Inmate Manipulation.
NIC Knowledgebase: Information on Staff-Inmate Boundaries and Inmate Manipulation
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Policy, Procedures & Audits - 18 items(s)

Resources
6 CFR Part 115: Standards To Prevent, Detect, and Respond to Sexual Abuse and Assault in Confinement Facilities; Final Rule (2014). “The purpose of this regulatory action is to set standards to prevent, detect, and respond to sexual abuse in Department of Homeland Security (DHS) confinement facilities. Sexual violence, against any victim, is an assault on human dignity and an affront to American values” (p. 13100). Provisions of these standards are broken down into parts covering “two distinct types of facilities: (1) Immigration detention facilities, which are overseen by ICE and used for longer-term detention of aliens in immigration proceedings or awaiting removal from the United States; and (2) holding facilities, which are used by ICE and U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) for temporary administrative detention of individuals pending release from custody or transfer to a court, jail, prison, other agency or other unit of the facility or agency” (p. 13101). Sections of this final rule include: abbreviations; executive summary; estimated costs and benefits; background to sexual assault during custody; and a detailed discussion of the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA). Standards comprising Part 115 of Title 6 of the U.S. Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) are: definitions; Subpart A—Standards for Immigration Detention Facilities—coverage, prevention planning, responsive planning, training and education, assessment for risk of sexual victimization and abusiveness, reporting, official response following a detainee report, investigations, discipline, medical and mental care, data collection and review, audits and compliance, and additional provision in agency policies; Subpart B—Standards for DHS Holding Facilities--containing the same paragraph designations but with regulations applicable to DHS holding facilities; and Subpart C—External Auditing and Corrective Action—scope of audits, auditor qualifications, audit contents and findings, audit corrective action plan, and audit appeals.
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Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) (2013). This policy intends “to develop a written institutional plan to coordinate actions taken in response to an incident of sexual abuse, among staff first responders, medical and mental health staff, investigators, and facility leadership” (p. 1). Procedures cover: general issues related to sexual abuse and sexual harassment; training and education; reporting; screening for risk; medical and mental care; investigations; discipline; and data collection and review.
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The Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003: The Impact of National PREA Standards on Community Corrections (2013). Wondering how the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) impacts the management of offenders in the community? Then this is the resource for you. This handbook aims to educate community corrections staff on: why community correctional staff and administrators need to be concerned about sexual abuse of offenders; identifying inappropriate relationships with and between offenders; the impact of the National PREA Standards on agency policies, practices and special concerns community correctional staff have in addressing PREA; where reports of sexual abuse may come from and the duties of first responders; what the consequences are for sexual abuse of offenders; and how community correctional staff members can prevent sexual abuse of offenders. “This publication provides guidance for departments and agencies supervising adults on community supervision. Because the National PREA Standards cover juvenile community corrections under the juvenile standards, this publication will focus on adults. However, there are resources developed addressing juveniles under community supervision.”
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PREA Statewide Probation and Parole Direction (2007). "This paper is the initial product of the work group [of six state directors of probation and parole] and summarizes its deliberations and findings" (p. 3). Sections of this document include: background; preamble; what PREA (Prison Rape Elimination Act) is and what it requires; what PREA requires of community corrections agencies and when; suggested practices in community corrections -- key points of discussion (i.e., systemic approach, law, policy, training, operational considerations, investigations, culture, and tools); current Bureau of Justice Statistics data collection and reporting requirements; and PREA operational considerations.
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Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA): Considerations for Policy Review (2006). A policy review guide designed to assist in drafting PREA (Prison Rape Elimination Act) policies for review by the National Institute of Corrections is provided. Sections of this document are: purpose; questions to consider -- policy organization, definitions, zero tolerance, staff/offender duty to report, prevention, and investigations (e.g., general, selection and training of investigators, protocols, and aftermath); and list of resources.
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Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003. "An Act to provide for the analysis of the incidence and effects of prison rape in Federal, State, and local institutions and to provide information, resources, recommendations, and funding to protect individuals from prison rape."
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The National PREA Resource Center - Prisons and Jail Standards. Standards for Prisons and Jails, Responsive Planning - Prisons and Jails, raining and Education - Prisons and Jails, Screening for Risk of Sexual Victimization and Abusiveness - Prisons and Jails, Reporting - Prisons and Jails, Official Response Following an Inmate Report - Prisons and Jails, Investigations - Prisons and Jails, Discipline - Prisons and Jails, Medical and Mental Care - Prisons and Jails, Data Collection and Review - Prisons and Jails, Audits - Prisons and Jails, Auditing and Corrective Action - Prisons and Jails, State Compliance - Prisons and Jails
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The National PREA Resource Center - Audit. "This feature of the PRC’s website seeks to support confinement facility and agency efforts toward PREA compliance by providing detailed information about the audit instrument, the audit process, and auditor certification. The PRC will also use this section to provide continuing guidance from the Department of Justice related to the audit process."
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PREA Fact Bulletin Audits (2015). "The PREA fact bulletin series is an American Jail Association project funded by the national PREA Resource Center (PCR). Each bulletin covers a specific topic relative to meeting PREA compliance. The intent of the bulletins is to be a quick, and general guide and not an all inclusive and comprehensive coverage of the topic.The topics for the bulletins were selected based on input from the field about the issues that present unique challenges for jails as they work toward PREA compliance and to clarify issues that present the most questions. More information on these topics can be obtained by using the resources noted at the end of each bulletin."
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Power Point Audits American Jail Association May 4, 2013 .
Presented by Susan McCampbell & Elizabeth Layman
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Power Point - PREA Audit Instrument Introduction June 13, 2013.
To access the PREA Audit Instrument: http://bit.ly/12HDo74
Audit FAQ: http://www.prearesourcecenter.org/faq#n1053
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Enforcing Prison Rape Elimination Standards Proves Tricky (2014). "On a recent day at the Maryland Correctional Institution for Women, inmates in jumpsuits peek out of their cells to see three men with clipboards walk into the housing unit. These men are auditors doing a practice inspection. They're here to see if the facility complies with a federal law called the Prison Rape Elimination Act, or PREA."
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National Standards to Prevent, Detect, and Respond to Prison Rape (2012). "The Department of Justice (Department) is issuing a final rule adopting national standards to prevent, detect, and respond to prison rape, pursuant to the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (PREA). The Department is requesting comment on one issue relating to staffing in juvenile facilities."
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National Standards to Prevent, Detect, and Respond to Prison Rape Executive Summary (2012). "The goal of this rulemaking is to prevent, detect, and respond to sexual abuse in confinement facilities, pursuant to the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003. For too long, incidents of sexual abuse against incarcerated persons have not been taken as seriously as sexual abuse outside prison walls. In popular culture, prison rape is often the subject of jokes; in public discourse, it has been at times dismissed by some as an inevitable— or even deserved— consequence of criminality."
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PREA Regulatory Impact Assessment (2012). "This Regulatory Impact Assessment (RIA) assesses, and monetizes to the extent feasible,the benefits of combating rape and sexual abuse in America’s prisons, jails, lockups, community confinement facilities (CCFs), and juvenile facilities, and the costs of full nationwide compliance with the Attorney General’s national standards under the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA).It also summarizes the comments relating to the costs and benefits of the standards that the Department received in response to the Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRM) and Initial Regulatory Impact Assessment (IRIA)."
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Hawaii - Department of Public Safety - Health Care PREA Compliance & Sexual/Physical Abuse Procedure. "The purpose of this policy is to establish guidelines and procedures in accordance with the Prison Rape Elimination Act to assure the provisions of high quality, supportive health care services for victims of sexual assault or abuse as well as for victims of physical violence."
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New Hampshire DOC - Prison Rape Elimination Act Procedures. "This policy establishes uniform guidelines and procedures to prevent, deter, and respond to all types of prison sexual assault, sexual victimization and staff sexual misconduct aimed at persons under the care and custody of the NEW HAMPSHIRE DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS (NHDOC). In keeping with the intent of the federal statute (PREA, P.L. 108-79), NHDOC is committed to a zero-tolerance standard for prison sexual assault and sexual victimization, including offender-on-offender sexual victimization , staff-on-offender sexual misconduct, and sexual assault by any other person working with or having contact with offenders under departmental control or supervision. This policy makes the prevention of offender-on-offender sexual assault and staff sexual misconduct a top priority. The Department will immediately respond to, investigate, and support the prosecution of sexual assault, victimization and misconduct through both internal and external processes in partnership with state police, local law enforcement, county prosecutors and the NH Office of the Attorney General."
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Virginia DOC - Prison Elimination Act (PREA). "This operating procedure provides guidance for the Department of Corrections related to Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (Public Law No. 108-79) (PREA) and standards compliance, and will serve to direct staff to specific PREA related content in other DOC operating procedures."
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PREA - Juveniles - 14 items(s)

Resources
PREA Youthful Inmate Implementation (2013). This webpage provides information regarding the implementation of the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) “youthful inmate” standard. Youthful inmates are any incarcerated individuals under the age of 18. Links are provided to a two part webinar series regarding this implementation in three jurisdictions—Oregon, North Carolina, and Indiana. Other sections provide information about: the “youthful inmate” PREA Standard 115.14; options for implementation—reducing the number of youthful inmates in adult facilities, entering into cooperative agreements with outside jurisdictions to facilitate compliance, and confining all youthful inmates to separate housing units; lessons learned; and resources for additional information.
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Keeping Our Kids Safe: The Prison Rape Elimination Act and Juvenile Justice: A Guide for Juvenile Justice Administrators (2006). This program provides an introduction to the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) for those individuals who work with youth in the juvenile justice system. The video covers locations of assault, consequences, approaches, statistics, prevention and reduction, youth issues, prosecution, outcomes, and action points.

The companion CD includes: letter from the Director of the National Institute of Corrections (NIC); facilitator’s guide for “Keeping Our Kids Safe”; “Keeping Our Kids Safe” video; and a copy of “Public Law 108-79: Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003.”
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Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Summary of Responses from Juvenile Focus Group on Staff Sexual Misconduct and Youth on Youth Sexual Assault (2005). Responses to thirteen questions regarding curriculum related to staff sexual misconduct with youth and youth on youth sexual assault are provided. "The objectives of the focus groups included: (1) to gather data that will inform NIC [National Institute of Corrections] in how to best develop a juvenile oriented curriculum on staff sexual misconduct; (2) to gather data that will guide NIC in identifying the major staff sexual misconduct related issues in juvenile corrections, including what stakeholders should be consulted, and what strategies should be utilized in naming the issues and building knowledge about the PREA [Prison Rape Elimination Act]; and (3) to gather information related to various aspects of youth on youth sexual assault" (p.2).
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Standards for the Prevention, Detection, Response, and Monitoring of Sexual Abuse in Juvenile Facilities . "Sexual abuse of people in confinement violates their basic human rights, impedes the likelihood of their successful reentry into the community, and violates the Government’s obligation to provide safe and humane conditions of confinement. The government’s obligation is even stronger when it comes to ensuring the safety of young people in its custody, youth who by virtue of their age are even more vulnerable to abuse and less likely to be able to protect themselves."
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Oregon Youth Authority - PREA in the Juvenile Justice System . "National PREA Resource Workgroup
Working together to share, develop and collaborate on resources, requirements and zero tolerance toward sexual abuse in corrections."
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PREA Mandates in Juvenile Justice Facilities: Protecting the Health and Wellness of our Youngest Inmates (2015). "The month of April brings a change of seasons around the country, and a new focus issue to the table; Health and Wellness. In the area of Juvenile Corrections, we might take this opportunity to revisit a topic I wrote about in February, “Incarcerated Youth at Risk: Is Your Facility Doing Enough to Avoid Liability?” Ultimately, a correctional facility has an ongoing obligation to safeguard the health and wellbeing of its minor inmates. In February, I asked whether your institution was doing enough to avoid liability in this area. This month, with that overarching question in mind, we consider whether your institution is compliant with the mandates of PREA? Juvenile inmates are, indeed, a “special” population, and as such, are particularly vulnerable to victimization while in custody, both from inmate-on inmate conduct, as well as staff misconduct. Ongoing attention to the federal mandates of PREA goes a long way toward ensuring that a juvenile inmate’s time in custody will be devoid of the types of sexual assault issues that have now been recognized and documented in our juvenile correctional facilities around the country. With national standards now established, those institutions choosing, or simply unable, to comply with these mandates, situate themselves as particularly vulnerable, “easy targets” for liability."
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How PREA affects our handling of juvenile offenders (2015).
"With new rules due to PREA, we have to be more hands-on with juvenile offenders than ever before"
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Standing Up to Sexual Misconduct: An Advocacy Toolkit to End the Sexual Abuse of Children in Juvenile Facilities (2015). "In the most recent survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Justice, one in ten youth in juvenile facilities throughout the country reported being sexually victimized at that significantly higher. Fortunately, there are new advocacy opportunities to reverse this alarming statistic. Congress passed the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) in 2003. PREA is the first federal civil statute focused specifically on addressing sexual violence in juvenile facilities, jails, prisons, and other facilities. The Act establishes a nationwide zero-tolerance standard for sexual misconduct in custodial settings. It also provides resources and requirements aimed at helping jurisdictions achieve that goal, and it mandated development of national standards designed to help facilities prevent, detect, and respond to sexual misconduct."
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As Prisons Prepare for PREA, Impact on Youthful Inmates May Be Major (2013). "In 2003, the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) -- a federal legislative proposal that sought to curb incidents of sexual assault in both adult prisons and juvenile detention facilities -- was signed into law by President George W. Bush.

The newly formed National Prison Rape Elimination Commission (NPREC) was then tasked with establishing PREA standards; ultimately, nine years would pass before the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) approved the final standards set forth by the NPREC."
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Key Differences between the PREA Standards for Adult Prisons and Jails and the PREA Standards for Juvenile Facilities (2013). "PREA standards for juvenile facilities and adult prisons and jails are mostly the same, but there are some substantive differences. This fact sheet outlines those differences."
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What are some best practices related to sexual misconduct prevention, detection, and response that are not included in the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) standards? (2012). "The PREA standards represent an important step toward establishing a culture of zero tolerance for sexual abuse and sexual harassment of youth in juvenile and adult facilities. However, the Justice Department did not include a number of best practices within the standards themselves, choosing instead to leave them to agencies’ discretion."
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The Prison Rape Elimination Act Standards - Comments from youth advocates on minimum staffing ratios in juvenile facilities (2012). "We strongly support the Department’s inclusion of minimum staff-to-youth ratios in the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) juvenile facility standards. Requiring minimum staffing ratios reflects what we now know about the best ways of preventing and detecting sexual misconduct, as well as the many tragic examples of what can happen when facilities fail to adequately supervise youth in their care. The proposed standard reflects a practical approach to the widespread problem of sexual victimization in facilities that house youth. By establishing a minimum level of direct supervision, agencies and facilities will be better equipped to prevent and detect the red flags associated with victimization. When implemented alongside other tools to combat sexual misconduct such as staff training, youth education, supervision of staff, and reporting mechanisms, the minimum staff-to-youth ratios will present the best opportunity to protect youth from sexual misconduct."
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Protecting Youth in the PREA National Standards - Public comments from youth advocates on proposed standards for the implementation of the National Prison Rape Elimination Act (2011). " The Department’s draft regulations have the potential to improve the safety of children involved in the justice system. They reflect pragmatic approaches to a complicated problem, but we believe that the standards still need improvement in order to reflect the nature of juvenile facilities and to protect youth from harm. Because young people have the capacity for change and growth, these regulations must take into account the goals of the juvenile justice system to support their rehabilitation in a safe environment. Further, the correctional settings."
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LGBTQI Juveniles.
NIC Knowledgebase: LGBTQI Juveniles
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PREA - LGBTI - 7 items(s)

Resources
Policy Review and Development Guide: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Persons in Custodial Settings, 2nd Edition (2014). "In the first edition of this guide, we aimed to reach out to correctional agencies in order to help them identify, address, and respond to abuse of LGBTI individuals through agency policies and procedures. We hoped to deepen the dialogue between staff and administrators as well as community leaders and criminal justice advocates about strategies to eliminate abuse of LGBTI individuals in custody. The second edition of this guide provides updated key information to correctional agencies about PREA’s impact on agency practice as it relates to LGBTI individuals in custody" (p. 1). This guide is made up of three chapters: introduction and overview—introduction, evolving terminology and definitions, core principles for understanding LGBTI individuals in custody, and emerging data on LGBTI individuals in custodial settings and the challenges they face; LGBTI youth under custodial supervision—the law, PREA standards, other governing principles (state human rights laws and professional codes of ethics), and elements of legally sound and effective policy and practice; and LGBTI adults under custodial supervision—the law, PREA standards, and elements of legally sound and effective policy and practice. Appendixes provide: glossary; case law digest; additional resources; webpages with sample policies; Issues to Watch: The Impact of Non-Custodial LGBTI Developments on Corrections; sample policies; and training matrices.
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NIC - LGBTI Policy Review and Development Guide: Chapter 3. LGBTI Adults under Custodial Supervision . "Similar to staff in juvenile facilities, many adult correctional professionals are ill prepared to work with inmates who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI), and most agencies do not have policies or provide training for staff related to working with LGBTI inmates. Without essential policies and training, staff members are unprepared to provide safe and professional care to this population, especially given the challenges that LGBTI inmates present in securing safe housing and medical and mental health care."
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Promoting Prison Rape: Shortsighted Policies Put Trans Prisoners at Risk of Sexual Assault (2016). "For the past three years a bitter battle has waged between the transgender inmates of FCI Petersburg and prison administrators. On the prisoners’ side, calls for hormone therapy, counseling, female commissary products (e.g., makeup, fragrance, bras, underwear, etc.), hair removal, and even SRS have been advanced. The trans prisoners simply want gender congruence; for their internal and external selves to be the same."
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How the Prison Rape Elimination Act Helps LGBT Immigrants in Detention (2014). "More than a decade after Congress passed the Prison Rape Elimination Act, or PREA, the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, or DHS, published standards to prevent, detect, and respond to sexual abuse and assault in immigration detention facilities. A congressional mandate requires Immigration and Customs Enforcement, or ICE, to detain 34,000 immigrants every day who may be subject to removal under immigration law. The 249 facilities in which ICE holds immigrants are currently covered by a patchwork of standards, and prior to the establishment of the PREA standards in March, no one standard bound all facilities."
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Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Toolkit - End the Abuse: Protecting LGBTI Prisoners from Sexual Assault (2014). "A prison or jail sentence should never include sexual assault. On May 17, 2012, the Department of Justice released the final federal regulations implementing the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA). These regulations apply to federal, state and local correctional facilities and lock-ups and include key protections for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (LGBTI) individuals. Despite—or likely because of—the decade-long process leading up to the passage of the final regulations, much confusion remains about how PREA’s protections can be leveraged to protect LGBTI individuals from sexual assault. This four-part toolkit is designed for advocates both in and outside of correctional settings to use PREA’s requirements to end the abuse of LGBTI individuals. As federal, state and local agencies reassess their policies and practices to come into compliance with PREA, there will be key opportunities to make important policy changes that will impact all individuals in confinement settings. The time to act is now."
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LGBT People and the Prison Rape Elimination Act (2012). "Sexual abuse is rampant in prison and detention facilities today, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and gender nonconforming people are among those most at risk. To address this crisis, Congress unanimously passed the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) in 2003. After nearly a decade of study and review, the U.S. Department of Justice issued final regulations to implement PREA in May 2012. These rules represent an historic step toward ending the crisis of sexual abuse in confinement. This resource outlines key protections provided by the PREA Standards and what they mean for LGBT people."
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Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex Offenders.
NIC Knowledgebase: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex Offenders
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PREA - Special Populations - 5 items(s)

Resources
Keeping Vulnerable Populations Safe under PREA: Alternative Strategies to the Use of Segregation in Prisons and Jails (2015). "The purpose of this guide is to provide prison and jail administrators and staff with strategies for safely housing inmates at risk of sexual abuse without isolating them. Inmates at risk for sexual victimization—whether identified through screening or victimized in confinement—need protection from abusers, equal access to programming and health and mental health services, and congregate opportunities. This guide will (a) briefly review the use of segregated housing and protective custody in the United States, (b) note potential outcomes of isolation that motivated the construction of the PREA standards (“standards”) restricting the use of segregation, and (c) present promising strategies for implementing the standards without isolating at-risk populations in prisons and jails. The guide includes discussions of populations at particularly high risk for sexual abuse in confinement: women; youthful inmates in adult facilities; and lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex (LGBTI) individuals, and gender nonconforming inmates. Most of the strategies discussed are drawn from practices used by state prison systems. However, these strategies—and the principles behind them—apply to jails. The PREA standards for community confinement facilities and lockups do not address protective custody or other types of segregated housing, since long-term isolating conditions are not considered an issue in those facilities. Community confinement facilities and lockups are not, therefore, discussed here."
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Making PREA and victim services accessible for incarcerated people with disabilities: An implementation guide for practitioners on the adult and juvenile standards (2015). "The Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) sets standards to ensure that information about PREA and victim services are accessible to people with disabilities. The purpose of this guide is to provide strategies to correctional agencies that will aid their compliance with these PREA requirements. The strategies discussed in this guide draw on established practices used by victim service organizations—both community-based and those based in government agencies—to make their services more accessible for this population. By offering concrete recommendations on how to adapt these community practices to correctional settings, this guide aims to help adult and juvenile correctional facilities increase accessibility for people with disabilities. While it is not a focus of this guide, an important component to making PREA and victim services accessible for people with disabilities is to institutionalize any new practices or partnerships in facility policy."
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Female warden works toward safety for female inmates (2015). "Warden Hope Cooper took over full-time after the departure of Richard Koerner"
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Complaint Alleges Sexual Abuse In Immigrant Detention Center (2014). "WASHINGTON — Legal groups alleged this week that employees of a family immigration detention facility in Karnes City, Texas, harassed and sexually abused female detainees who had been caught crossing the border illegally.

The complaint, based on interviews with women in the Karnes City facility, alleges that at least three employees there engaged in harassment and abuse of female detainees. Some women were removed from their cells “for the purpose of engaging in sexual acts,” according to the complaint. Employees promised women help and money in exchange for “sexual favors,” the complaint says, and groped them in front of others. The groups allege that employees called detainees their “novias” and “girlfriends.”"
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Justice Involved Women.
NIC Knowledgebase: Justice Involved Women
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Resources - 9 items(s)

Resources
National PREA Resource Center (2015). "The PRC’s aim is to provide assistance to those responsible for state and local adult prisons and jails, juvenile facilities, community corrections, lockups, tribal organizations, and inmates and their families in their efforts to eliminate sexual abuse in confinement. The PRC serves as a central repository for the best research in the field on trends, prevention, and response strategies, and best practices in corrections … This website consists of an extensive library, stories of efforts at compliance from around the country, information about national trainings, webinars, resources including tool kits and model policies." Points of entry include: library—legal, policy and practice, resources (curricula, training materials, toolkits and handbooks, relevant websites, resources for survivors, and tribal facilities), news coverage, research and statistics, and standards; training and technical assistance—PREA Essentials (standards for prisons and jails, lockups, community confinement facilities, and juvenile facilities), curricula, PREA in Action (readiness, embracing the standards, youthful inmate implementation, partnerships, and LGBTI youth and adults in confinement), upcoming and archived webinars, BJA demonstration sites, and Request for Assistance; audit—online system, paper instruments, process and appeals, auditor qualifications and application, list of certified auditors, trainings, Auditor Field Training Program, and Auditor Feedback Form; news and events—news of interest, and upcoming events; and FAQ.

Curricula include: Specialized Training--Investigating Sexual Abuse in Confinement Settings; Specialized Training--PREA Medical and Mental Care Standards; Preventing and Addressing Sexual Abuse in Tribal Detention Facilities--The Impact of the Prison Rape Elimination Act; Inmate Education Video; Inmate Education Resource Guide; Human Resources and Administrative Investigations Employee Training; Victim Services; Gender Responsive Strategies – Adults; Gender Responsive Strategies – Juveniles; Employee Training; Guidance on Cross-Gender and Transgender Pat Searches; and NIC E-learning Courses.
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Correctional Internal Affairs Investigators Job Analysis (2006). A job profile for an Internal Affairs Investigator in state operated adult correctional facilities is provided. This report contains these sections: executive summary; introduction; overview of the DACUM job analysis; DACUM job analysis results for Correctional Internal Affairs Investigators; top training tasks for new and veteran Internal Affairs Investigators in the Kentucky Department of Corrections; comparing Correctional Investigator training needs with the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA); PREA Training Topic Exercise; and focused conversation. Appendixes include: a detailed overview of the DACUM job analysis process; PREA Subject Matter Expert Review of Investigator Job Profile; knowledge, skills, traits exercise; and Department of Corrections DACUM Job Analysis Chart.
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The National PREA Resource Center - Request for Assistance. "Please fill out the form below in order to request PREA-related training and/or technical assistance for your jurisdiction or agency. The more detail provided in your request will improve the PRC's ability to meet your needs. For jurisdictions less familiar on PREA, the PRC would encourage you browse the resources in the "PREA Essentials" page first. If your jurisdiction has general questions or comments for the PRC you can communicate those through our "Contact Us" page.

To submit information on complaints or concerns about the conduct of a DOJ Certified PREA Auditor, please refer to the "Auditor Feedback Form"."
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Just Detention International: Webinars . "Just Detention International is a health and human rights organization that seeks to end sexual abuse in all forms of detention."
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American Correctional Association (ACA) . "As a partner of the PREA Resource Center, ACA has dedicated its experience and expertise in auditing to the PREA audit protocol. ACA also partnered with the PREA resource center in the areas of communications, training, and technical assistance in sharing information, techniques, and tools for implementing the PREA requirements. ACA staff serves in the role of PREA auditor training (conducted by the PREA Resource Center). To date, more than 50 certified ACA auditors have also been trained as PREA auditors."
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Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA). Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) resource page.
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End Silence: The Project on Addressing Prison Rape. "The Project on Addressing Prison Rape (The Project) is committed to eliminating sexual abuse for individuals in custodial settings. The Project is a leader in addressing the implications and implementation of the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (PREA) and its national standards. Since 2000, the Project has provided training, technical assistance and legal guidance for correctional agencies, advocates and survivors who want to effectively prevent, respond and eliminate sexual abuse in custodial settings.

Overall, the Project has four goals: (1) training; (2) technical assistance; (3) legal expertise regarding sexual abuse in custodial settings; and (4) providing guidance on issues correctional agencies and advocates face when addressing PREA and responding to sexual abuse in custodial settings."
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Just Detention International. "Just Detention International is a health and human rights organization that seeks to end sexual abuse in all forms of detention."
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Jailhouse Lawyer's Handbook. "This handbook is a resource for prisoners who wish to file a federal lawsuit addressing poor conditions in prison or abuse by prison staff. It also contains limited general information about the American legal system. This handbook is available for free to anyone: prisoners, families, friends, activists, lawyers and others."
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Statistics - 3 items(s)

Resources
Prison Rape Elimination Act (Sexual Victimization In Correctional Facilities). "The Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (PREA; Public Law 108-79) requires the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) to carry out a comprehensive statistical review and analysis of the incidence and effects of prison rape for each calendar year. BJS’s review must include, but is not limited to, the identification of the common characteristics of both victims and perpetrators of prison rape; and prisons and prison systems with a high incidence of prison rape. Analysis must—

-be based on a random sample, or other scientifically appropriate sample, of not less than 10% of all federal, state, and county prisons, and a representative sample of municipal prisons; and include at least one prison from each state

-use surveys and other statistical studies of current and former inmates from a representative sample of federal, state, county, and municipal prisons; and ensure the confidentiality of each survey participant

-provide a list of institutions in the sample, separated into each category and ranked according to the incidence of prison rape in each institution; and provide a list of any prisons in the sample that did not cooperate with the survey.
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PREA Data Collection Activities, 2016. "Describes the Bureau of Justice Statistics' (BJS) activities to collect data and report on the incidence and effects of sexual victimization in correctional facilities, as required by the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (PREA) (P.L. 108-79). The report summarizes BJS's efforts during 2015 and 2016, which included analyzing administrative records of sexual victimization in juvenile correctional facilities based on the Survey of Sexual Victimization (SSV) and collecting data on incidents that occurred in adult and juvenile facilities during 2014. In addition, BJS and its data collection agents, RTI International and Westat, conducted further analyses of previous inmate and youth self-report surveys to provide a more comprehensive understanding of facility- and individual-level indicators of sexual victimization. This reports meets the PREA requirement to report on BJS's activities for the preceding calendar year by June 30 of each year."
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Sexual Victimization Reported By Juvenile Correctional Authorities, 2007-2012. "Presents national estimates of nonconsensual sexual acts, abusive sexual contacts, staff sexual misconduct, and staff sexual harassment reported by correctional authorities in state juvenile correctional systems and local and private juvenile correctional facilities from 2007 to 2012. The report also examines substantiated incidents, including characteristics of victims and perpetrators, location, time of day, nature of injuries, impact on the victims, and sanctions imposed on the perpetrators. Companion tables in the Survey of Sexual Violence in Juvenile Correctional Facilities, 2007-2012 - Statistical Tables include counts of allegations and substantiated incidents of sexual victimization for each state juvenile correctional system, juvenile correctional facility in Indian country, and sampled locally and privately operated juvenile correctional facility. Data are from BJS's Survey of Sexual Violence (SSV), which has been conducted annually since 2004."
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Toolkits - 4 items(s)

Resources
Implementing the Prison Rape Elimination Act: Toolkit for Jails (2013). UPDATED 11/26/13: Minor edits. “The goal of this Toolkit is to provide jails of all sizes, political divisions, and geographic locations with a step-by-step guide for preventing, detecting, and eliminating sexual abuse of inmates in their custody – and for responding effectively to abuse when it occurs. Prison rape includes all forms of inmate sexual abuse within a correctional facility, including state and federal prisons, county and municipal jails, police lock-ups, holding facilities, inmate transportation vehicles, juvenile detention facilities, and community corrections facilities. Protecting arrestees, detainees, and inmates from sexual violence is part of a jail’s core mission. This toolkit will help assess your jail’s operations with an eye to improvements.” The Toolkit is divided into folders holding materials related to: introductory information about PREA [Prison Rape Elimination Act] and it Standards; a Self-Assessment Checklist with supporting forms “to provide a step-by-step process for jails to review and assess policies, procedures, and practices in light of the PREA Standards and accepted best practices”; and additional resources to assist you in PREA-readiness.
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Implementing the Prison Rape Elimination Act: Toolkit for Juvenile Agencies and Facilities (2013). “The goal of this Toolkit is to provide juvenile agencies and facilities of all sizes, political divisions, and geographic locations with a step-by-step guide for preventing, detecting, and eliminating sexual abuse of residents in their custody – and for responding effectively to abuse when it occurs. Prison rape includes all forms of resident sexual abuse within a correctional facility, including state and federal prisons, county and municipal jails, police lock-ups, holding facilities, resident transportation vehicles, juvenile facilities, and community corrections facilities.” This toolkit will help assess your juvenile facility’s operations with an eye to improvements. The Toolkit is divided into folders holding materials related to: introductory information about PREA [Prison Rape Elimination Act] and it Standards; a Self-Assessment Checklist with supporting forms “to provide a step-by-step process for juvenile facilities to review and assess policies, procedures, and practices in light of the PREA Standards and accepted best practices”; and additional resources to assist you in PREA-readiness.
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Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Toolkit - End the Abuse: Protecting LGBTI Prisoners from Sexual Assault (2014). "A prison or jail sentence should never include sexual assault. On May 17, 2012, the Department of Justice released the final federal regulations implementing the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA). These regulations apply to federal, state and local correctional facilities and lock-ups and include key protections for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex (LGBTI) individuals. Despite—or likely because of—the decade-long process leading up to the passage of the final regulations, much confusion remains about how PREA’s protections can be leveraged to protect LGBTI individuals from sexual assault. This four-part toolkit is designed for advocates both in and outside of correctional settings to use PREA’s requirements to end the abuse of LGBTI individuals. As federal, state and local agencies reassess their policies and practices to come into compliance with PREA, there will be key opportunities to make important policy changes that will impact all individuals in confinement settings. The time to act is now."
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Standing Up to Sexual Misconduct: An Advocacy Toolkit to End the Sexual Abuse of Children in Juvenile Facilities (2015). "In the most recent survey conducted by the U.S. Department of Justice, one in ten youth in juvenile facilities throughout the country reported being sexually victimized at that significantly higher. Fortunately, there are new advocacy opportunities to reverse this alarming statistic. Congress passed the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) in 2003. PREA is the first federal civil statute focused specifically on addressing sexual violence in juvenile facilities, jails, prisons, and other facilities. The Act establishes a nationwide zero-tolerance standard for sexual misconduct in custodial settings. It also provides resources and requirements aimed at helping jurisdictions achieve that goal, and it mandated development of national standards designed to help facilities prevent, detect, and respond to sexual misconduct."
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