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Browsing Documents Related to 'Drug Courts'

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Date Title Type
2014
Document 028317
Community Corrections Collaborative Network: Safe and Smart Ways to Solve America's Correctional Challenges
By Ziedenberg, Jason. National Institute of Corrections (NIC). Community Services Division (Washington, DC); NIC-TA#13C5022. National Institute of Corrections (NIC). Community Corrections Collaborative Network (CCCN) (Washington, DC).
The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) Community Corrections Collaborative Network (CCCN)—a network representing community corrections professionals—commissioned a position paper to explore the successes and challenges facing the community corrections field. The position paper, "Community Corrections Collaborative Network: Safe and Smart Ways To Solve America’s Correctional Challenges", finds that community corrections is a critical part of the public safety system that supervises individua... Read More
PDF
36 pages
2013
Document 027932
Cost-Benefit Analysis of Adult Drug Courts
Iowa. Legislative Services Agency (LSA). Fiscal Services Division (Des Moines, IA).
“This Issue Review provides a summary of national and Iowa research on the effectiveness of Adult Drug Courts, an overview of these programs currently operating in Iowa, including a description of offenders served and funding mechanisms, an analysis of the costs and benefits of the Adult Drug Courts operated by Community-Based Corrections, and the estimated need for funding” (p. 1). Sections of this report cover: the current situation in Iowa—funding history, offenders and risk, admissions, clos... Read More
PDF
28 pages
2013
Document 027257
The Outskirts of Hope: How Ohio’s Debtors’ Prisons Are Ruining Lives and Costing Communities
American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Ohio (Cleveland, OH).
“Taking care of a fine is straightforward for some Ohioans — having been convicted of a criminal or traffic offense and sentenced to pay a fine, an affluent defendant may simply pay it and go on with his or her life. For Ohio’s poor and working poor, by contrast, an unaffordable fine is just the beginning of a protracted process that may involve contempt charges, mounting fees, arrest warrants, and even jail time. The stark reality is that, in 2013, Ohioans are being repeatedly jailed simply for... Read More
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24 pages
2013
Document 027487
McLean County Jail Readies for NIC Assessment
By Quealy, Connor. WJBC (Bloomington, IL).
This article provides a brief look at the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) assessment of how the McLean County Jail handles mentally ill inmates. It also links to an excellent podcast with NIC Consultants Ken Ray and Mark Goldman and Sheriff Mike Emery. During this interview various topics were discussed such as: why NIC is there; what is the role of the consultants; and health care services for the mentally ill.... Read More
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17 minutes
2013
Document 027510
Testing the Cost Savings of Judicial Diversion: Final Report
By Waller, Mark S.; Carey, Shannon M.; Farley, Erin J.; Rempel, Michael. U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) (Washington, DC). NPC Research (Portland, OR); Center for Court Innovation (New York, NY).
“In April 2009, New York State passed Rockefeller Drug Law Reform. The law eliminated mandatory prison sentences for most felony drug offenders. In addition, through a procedure defined as judicial diversion, the law provided judges with discretion to link an expanded array of felony-level drug and property offenders to treatment, primarily through specialized drug courts” (p. 1). This study determined the impact of judicial diversion on drug treatment participation and related cost savings. Fou... Read More
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84 pages
2013
Document 027537
A Statewide Evaluation of New York’s Adult Drug Courts: Identifying Which Policies Work Best
By Cissner, Amanda B.; Rempel, Michael; Franklin, Allyson Walker; Roman, John K.; Bieler, Samuel; Cohen, Robyn; Cadoret, Carolyn R.. Center for Court Innovation (New York, NY); Urban Institute. Justice Policy Center (Washington, DC).
This study documented the positive impact of drug courts in New York on re-arrest and re-conviction both. If you are looking for ways to implement an effective drug court program or are looking to improve one you already have then you will find some helpful strategies to guide your efforts. This report contains eight chapter following an executive summary: introduction; research design and methodology; profile of drug court participant characteristics; profile of drug court policy characteristi... Read More
WEB
118 pages
2013
Document 027539
NIJ’s Multisite Adult Drug Court Evaluation
National Institute of Justice (NIJ) (Washington, DC).
This website provides access to materials related to the National Institute of Justice’s Multisite Adult Drug Court Evaluation (MADCE). You should look at the information provided here If you are thinking of implementing or improving drug courts in your jurisdiction. Sections cover: description of the evaluation; research questions; data collection; and links to results from the evaluation (publications, dataset, and presentations). ... Read More
WEB
2013
Document 027539
NIJ’s Multisite Adult Drug Court Evaluation
National Institute of Justice (NIJ) (Washington, DC).
This website provides access to materials related to the National Institute of Justice’s Multisite Adult Drug Court Evaluation (MADCE). You should look at the information provided here If you are thinking of implementing or improving drug courts in your jurisdiction. Sections cover: description of the evaluation; research questions; data collection; and links to results from the evaluation (publications, dataset, and presentations). ... Read More
WEB
2013
Document 027539
NIJ’s Multisite Adult Drug Court Evaluation
National Institute of Justice (NIJ) (Washington, DC).
This website provides access to materials related to the National Institute of Justice’s Multisite Adult Drug Court Evaluation (MADCE). You should look at the information provided here If you are thinking of implementing or improving drug courts in your jurisdiction. Sections cover: description of the evaluation; research questions; data collection; and links to results from the evaluation (publications, dataset, and presentations). ... Read More
WEB
2013
Document 027260
Six Steps to Improve Your Drug Court Outcomes for Adults with Co-Occurring Disorders
By Steadman, Henry J.; Peters, Roger H.; Carpenter, Christine; Mueser, Kim T.; Jaeger, Norma D.; Gordon, Richard B.; Fisler, Carol; Goss, Stephen; Olson, Eric; Osher, Fred C.; Noether, Chanson D.; Hardin, Carolyn. National Drug Court Institute (NDCI) (Alexandria, VA).
“One of the biggest challenges for drug courts is effectively working with participants with co-occurring disorders. By definition, persons with the dual diagnosis of both substance use disorders and mental illnesses have co-occurring disorders … every adult drug court can achieve positive outcomes for persons with co-occurring disorders—if the court is committed to doing so. With some creativity and thoughtful planning, most persons with co-occurring disorders can successfully participate in d... Read More
PDF
28 pages
2013
Document 027287
Final Report Outcome and Process Evaluation of Juvenile Drug Courts
By Latessa, Edward J.; Sullivan, Carrie; Blair, Lesli; Sullivan, Christopher; Smith, Paula. U.S. Dept. of Justice. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) (Washington, DC). University of Cincinnati. School of Criminal Justice. Center for Criminal Justice Research (Cincinnati, OH).
“This study adds to the existing juvenile drug court literature by providing a national multi-site outcome and process evaluation of nine juvenile drug courts from across the U.S. This study assesses the relative effect of each court, as well as their combined effectiveness in reaching the overall goal of reducing recidivism and improving youths' social functioning. It also identifies, where possible, the characteristics of youth and programs associated with successful outcomes” (p. 6). Five sec... Read More
PDF
421 pages
2013
Document 027073
Youth Incarceration in the United States Infographic
Annie E. Casey Foundation (Baltimore, MD).
This publication presents graphics regarding: the number of incarcerated youth from 1975-2010; disparities in confinement by race from 1997 to 2010; of those youth incarcerated, only 25% of them are committed due to violent offenses; the decline of juvenile incarceration rates by state; and recommendations for continuing with de-incarceration of youth.... Read More
PDF
2 pages
2013
Document 027073
Youth Incarceration in the United States Infographic
Annie E. Casey Foundation (Baltimore, MD).
This publication presents graphics regarding: the number of incarcerated youth from 1975-2010; disparities in confinement by race from 1997 to 2010; of those youth incarcerated, only 25% of them are committed due to violent offenses; the decline of juvenile incarceration rates by state; and recommendations for continuing with de-incarceration of youth.... Read More
PDF
2 pages
2013
Document 027382
PREA Data Collection Activities, 2013
By Beck, Allen J.. U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) (Washington, DC).
Activities of the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) related to prison rape during the 2012 calendar year are documented.... Read More
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5 pages
2013
Document 027382
PREA Data Collection Activities, 2013
By Beck, Allen J.. U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) (Washington, DC).
Activities of the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) related to prison rape during the 2012 calendar year are documented.... Read More
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5 pages
2013
Document 027405
Guidance to States: Recommendations for Developing Family Drug Court Guidelines
By Young, Nancy K.; Breitenbucher, Phil; Pfeifer, Jane E.. U.S. Dept. of Justice. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) (Washington, DC). Children and Family Futures (Irvine, CA); U.S. Dept. of Justice. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) (Washington, DC).
This publication “provides guidance for implementing an FDC [Family Drug Court], including the development of FDC partnerships and a common vocabulary for describing FDC components, with a focus on improving services to families who are involved with the child welfare system and are affected by substance use disorders. The authors hope that this document will help jurisdictions select and improve practices and, ultimately, outcomes for children and families” (p. 2). The recommendations made are:... Read More
PDF
108 pages
2013
Document 027418
Women and Reentry
Federal Interagency Reentry Council (Washington, DC).
This brief describes the accomplishments to date and agenda moving forward for this group. “The Cabinet-level Reentry Council is working to enhance community safety and well-being, assist those returning from prison and jail becoming productive citizens, and save taxpayers dollars by lowering the direct and collateral costs of incarceration” (p. 1). ... Read More
PDF
2 pages
2013
Document 027313
Mastering Your Role As a Front-Line Effective Supervisor: 10 Keys To Build Towards Success
By McDonald, Dalonika. corrections.com (Scituate, MA).
This is an excellent overview of what it takes for you to be a truly successful front-line supervisor. The 10 essential things that you need to do are: realize it begins with you; take the time to get to know your staff; learn what drives your staff; educate and train; build team work; allow different ways for your staff to talk to you; teach your staff how to solve problems; promote self-confidence and leadership skills among your staff; learn the power of being flexible (like a “liquid”); and ... Read More
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3 pages
2013
Document 027311
Recent Research on Assessing Risk of Violence: Studies Published in 2012 & 2013
By Pope, Kenneth S..
Anyone looking for an excellent place to begin learning about intimate partner violence risk assessments should visit this website. It presents a great collection of annotated citations sure to provide a firm introduction to this topic.... Read More
WEB
11 pages
2013
Document 027248
Promising Victim Related Practices in Probation and Parole Fact Sheet Series
U.S. Dept. of Justice. Office for Victims of Crime (Washington, DC). American Probation and Parole Association (APPA) (Lexington, KY); Council of State Governments (New York, NY).
Access to eight fact sheets “on topics related to crime victims and victims’ needs throughout the community corrections process” is provided. Topics covered are: The Role of Community Corrections in Victim Services; Collaboration and Partnership for Victim Services in Community Corrections; Family Violence; Restitution and Other Legal Financial Obligations; Seeking Victim Input; Victim Information and Notification; Victim/Offender Programs; and Workplace Violence.... Read More
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2013
Document 027251
Criminal Records in the Digital Age: A Review of Current Practices and Recommendations for Reform in Texas
By Gaebler, Helen. University of Texas. School of Law. William Wayne Justice Center for Public Interest Law (Austin, TX).
“It is time to broaden the reentry discussion and take a comprehensive look at how criminal records are accessed, disseminated, and utilized in this digital age and to find ways to make the criminal justice system more effective at providing meaningful opportunities for successful and lasting reintegration into our communities” (p. 2). This report explains how access to criminal records can damage efforts for successful reentry and provides suggestions on how to solve this challenge. Eight secti... Read More
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43 pages
2012
Document 027256
Integrating Tribal Cultural Practices into Tribal Juvenile Detention Centers and Reentry Plans
U.S. Dept. of Justice. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) (Washington, DC). Tribal Juvenile Detention and Reentry Resource Center (TJDR) (Washington, DC).
“Traditional cultural ceremonies and practices are integral parts of life for youth, families and communities across Indian Country. Cultural practices and ceremonies teach values of respect, responsibility, health and wellness. These teachings can be especially important for youth who are incarcerated, and those who are preparing to reenter their communities after serving time in a juvenile detention center. Cultural ceremonies and practices, including sweat lodges, talking circles, and storyte... Read More
PDF
5 pages
2012
Document 027245
Request for Proposal No. 2012-0313: Alabama Department of Corrections Therapeutic Education Facility
Alabama Dept. of Corrections. Office of the Commissioner (Montgomery, AL).
“In response to the current problem in Alabama prisons resulting from an ever increasing prison population, recidivism, and relapse, the ADOC announces this RFP [Request for Proposal] to all eligible and interested parties for the opportunity to submit a proposal, in accordance with the requirements herein … to establish a Therapeutic Education Facility in the State of Alabama to provide intensive, residential substance abuse and cognitive behavioral programming, as well as educational services ... Read More
PDF
55 pages
2012
Document 027310
Intimate Partner Violence Risk Assessment Tools: A Review
By Northcott, Melissa. Canada. Dept. of Justice. Research and Statistics Division (Ottawa, Ontario).
“The purpose of this report is to provide an understanding of intimate partner violence risk assessment tools and of the issues that assessors should consider when choosing an assessment instrument” (p. 1). It is an excellent resource for individuals looking for an introduction to the process of assessing the risk of another violent encounter by an intimate partner. The beginning of this report provides a clear description of what risk assessment and intimate partner violence are. This is follow... Read More
WEB
26 pages
2012
Document 027259
Behavior Modification 101 for Drug Courts: Making the Most of Incentives and Sanctions
By Marlowe, Douglas B.. National Drug Court Institute (NDCI) (Alexandria, VA).
“Drug Courts improve outcomes for drug-abusing offenders by combining evidence-based substance abuse treatment with strict behavioral accountability. Participants are carefully monitored for substance use and related behaviors and receive escalating incentives for accomplishments and sanctions for infractions. The nearly unanimous perception of both participants and staff members is that the positive effects of Drug Courts are largely attributable to the application of these behavioral contingen... Read More
PDF
12 pages
2012
Document 027262
Alternative Tracks in Adult Drug Courts: Matching Your Program to the Needs of Your Clients: Part Two of a Two-Part Series
By Marlowe, Douglas B.. National Drug Court Institute (NDCI) (Alexandria, VA).
“If a drug court has such compelling reasons to serve low-risk or low-need individuals, it should consider making substantive modifications to its program to accommodate the characteristics of its participants. This document describes a conceptual framework and evidence-based practice recommendations for designing alternative tracks within a drug court to serve different types of adult participants” (p. 1). Topics explained include: the risk and needs principles; risk and need matrix; high risk ... Read More
PDF
12 pages
2012
Document 027262
Alternative Tracks in Adult Drug Courts: Matching Your Program to the Needs of Your Clients: Part Two of a Two-Part Series
By Marlowe, Douglas B.. National Drug Court Institute (NDCI) (Alexandria, VA).
“If a drug court has such compelling reasons to serve low-risk or low-need individuals, it should consider making substantive modifications to its program to accommodate the characteristics of its participants. This document describes a conceptual framework and evidence-based practice recommendations for designing alternative tracks within a drug court to serve different types of adult participants” (p. 1). Topics explained include: the risk and needs principles; risk and need matrix; high risk ... Read More
PDF
12 pages
2012
Document 027262
Alternative Tracks in Adult Drug Courts: Matching Your Program to the Needs of Your Clients: Part Two of a Two-Part Series
By Marlowe, Douglas B.. National Drug Court Institute (NDCI) (Alexandria, VA).
“If a drug court has such compelling reasons to serve low-risk or low-need individuals, it should consider making substantive modifications to its program to accommodate the characteristics of its participants. This document describes a conceptual framework and evidence-based practice recommendations for designing alternative tracks within a drug court to serve different types of adult participants” (p. 1). Topics explained include: the risk and needs principles; risk and need matrix; high risk ... Read More
PDF
12 pages
2012
Document 027261
Targeting the Right Participants for Adult Drug Courts: Part One of a Two-Part Series
By Marlowe, Douglas B.. National Drug Court Institute (NDCI) (Alexandria, VA).
This publication introduces the reader to a wide range of scientific evidence regarding which offenders receive the most benefit from drug courts. Sections cover: high prognostic risk; defining risk; high criminogenic need; assessment; the DSM-IV-TR Diagnostic Criteria for Substance Dependence; suitability determinations; and alternative drug court tracks. “More than two decades of research has identified which individuals respond best to the drug court model and yield the largest returns on inv... Read More
PDF
12 pages
2012
Document 027240
Work Product of the 151st International Training Course: “Evidence-Based Treatment of Offenders”
United Nations Asia and Far East Institute for the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders (UNAFEI) (Tokyo, Japan).
This Training Course covers “various issues that relate to the evidence-based treatment of offenders. This issue contains papers contributed by visiting experts, selected individual presentation papers from among the participants, and the Reports of the 151st.” Contents of this volume are: Visiting Experts’ Paper. “Risk/Needs Assessment: From Theory and Methods to Policy and Practice” by Dr. Laurence Louis Motiuk (Canada) ; “The Effectiveness, Efficiency and Relevancy of Correctional Programs: A... Read More
WEB
153 pages
2012
Document 027240
Work Product of the 151st International Training Course: “Evidence-Based Treatment of Offenders”
United Nations Asia and Far East Institute for the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders (UNAFEI) (Tokyo, Japan).
This Training Course covers “various issues that relate to the evidence-based treatment of offenders. This issue contains papers contributed by visiting experts, selected individual presentation papers from among the participants, and the Reports of the 151st.” Contents of this volume are: Visiting Experts’ Paper. “Risk/Needs Assessment: From Theory and Methods to Policy and Practice” by Dr. Laurence Louis Motiuk (Canada) ; “The Effectiveness, Efficiency and Relevancy of Correctional Programs: A... Read More
WEB
153 pages
2012
Document 027235
Designing More Effective Correctional Programs Using Evidence-Based Practices
By Latessa, Edward J.. United Nations Asia and Far East Institute for the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders (UNAFEI) (Tokyo, Japan).
Are you looking for a research-based primer on evidence-based practices. Then this article is the place to start. “Through the lens of RNR [risk, need, and responsivity] scholars and practitioners alike have a framework by which they can better study and understand criminal conduct and the effectiveness (or lack thereof) of correctional programs. This model has been widely accepted in the USA, and I believe that approach provides a framework for designing effective correctional programs. This pa... Read More
PDF
16 pages
2012
Document 027235
Designing More Effective Correctional Programs Using Evidence-Based Practices
By Latessa, Edward J.. United Nations Asia and Far East Institute for the Prevention of Crime and the Treatment of Offenders (UNAFEI) (Tokyo, Japan).
Are you looking for a research-based primer on evidence-based practices. Then this article is the place to start. “Through the lens of RNR [risk, need, and responsivity] scholars and practitioners alike have a framework by which they can better study and understand criminal conduct and the effectiveness (or lack thereof) of correctional programs. This model has been widely accepted in the USA, and I believe that approach provides a framework for designing effective correctional programs. This pa... Read More
PDF
16 pages
2012
Document 027633
Voice of the Victim: A Perspective Spotlight Issue
U.S. Dept. of Justice. Office for Victims of Crime (OVC) (Washington, DC). American Probation and Parole Association (APPA) (Lexington, KY); Council of State Governments (CSG) (Lexington, KY).
This special issue of Perspectives is “is dedicated to promoting innovative programs, policies and protocols that improve crime victims’ rights and services in community corrections” (p. iii). Features of this issue cover: The Power of Information and Notification: A Victim/Survivor’s Perspective; Recommendations from the Public Hearing on Victim Issues in Probation and Parole: August 18, 2010; Crime Victims and Offender Reentry; Victim Services Provided Through The Allen County, Indiana Reentry... Read More
PDF
100 pages
2012
Document 026520
Drug Courts’ Effects on Criminal Offending for Juveniles and Adults
By Mitchell, Ojmarrh; Wilson, David B.; Eggers, Amy; MacKenzie, Doris L.. Campbell Collaboration (Oslo, Norway).
“The objective of this review is to systematically review quasi-experimental and experimental (RCT) evaluations of the effectiveness of drug courts in reducing recidivism, including drug courts for juvenile and DWI offenders. This systematic review critically assesses drug courts’ effects on recidivism in the short- and long-term, the methodological soundness of the existing evidence, and the relationship between drug court features and effectiveness” (p. 6). Results are provided for: a descript... Read More
PDF
87 pages
2011
Document 025101
Addicted to Courts: How a Growing Dependence on Drug Courts Impacts People and Communities
By Walsh, Nastassia. Open Society Institute-New York (New York, NY); Public Welfare Foundation (Washington, DC). Justice Policy Institute (Washington, DC).
Those individuals interested in drug courts should read this report. The author explains why: treatment through the justice system is not more effective than other treatment; drug courts are not the best way to improve public safety; drug courts are not as cost-effective as other options; drug courts widen the net of criminal justice control; and drug courts do not treat everyone equally.... Read More
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37 pages
2011
Document 025102
Drug Courts are Not the Answer: Toward a Health-Centered Approach to Drug Use
Drug Policy Alliance (DPA) (New York, NY).
This report focuses on the impact of drug courts and how they “compare with other policy approaches to drug use in terms of reducing drug arrests, incarceration and costs as well as problematic drug use” (p. 2). Five sections follow an executive summary: introduction; drug courts and the drug war; understanding drug courts—what the research shows; mixing treatment and punishment—a faulty approach; toward a health-centered approach to drug use; and conclusion. Drug courts seem to fail those indiv... Read More
PDF
32 pages
2011
Document 025104
The Verdict on Drug Courts and Other Problem-Solving Courts
By Marlowe, Douglas B..
Those individuals wondering about the effectiveness of drug courts need to read this article. It applies various legal evidentiary burdens of proof against the scientific evidence for drug courts. Sections comprising this article are: introduction; legal and scientific standards of proof—beyond a reasonable doubt, clear and convincing evidence, preponderance of evidence, probable cause, and reasonable suspicion; adult drug courts—effectiveness, target population, fidelity to the model (judicial ... Read More
PDF
40 pages
2011
Document 025210
Setting the Record Straight: Criticisms Answered: NADCP and Drug Court Leaders Respond to Criticisms with the Facts
National Association of Drug Court Professionals (NADCP) (Alexandria, VA).
Studies overwhelmingly demonstrate that “Drug Courts reduce crime, reduce substance abuse, and reduce family conflicts associated with domestic violence and child abuse.” Yet in the face of this mountain of data, two non-scientific think tanks, devoted to drug decriminalization, have taken the supporting evidence for drug courts and spun it to look like drug courts do not work. This website is the National Association of Drug Court Professionals’ (NADCP) way to counter the misinformation being p... Read More
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2011
Document 025153
The Multi-Site Adult Drug Court Evaluation
By Rossman, Shelli B, editor; Roman, John K., editor; Zweig, Janine M.; Rempel, Michael, editor; Lindquist, Christin H., editor. Urban Institute. Justice Policy Center (Washington, DC).
“The most extensive study of drug courts -- a five-year examination of 23 courts and six comparison jurisdictions in eight states -- found that these court programs can significantly decrease drug use and criminal behavior, with positive outcomes ramping upward as participants sensed their judge treated them more fairly, showed greater respect and interest in them, and gave them more chances to talk during courtroom proceedings…Drug courts save an average of $5,680 per participant, returning a n... Read More
WEB
14 p. + 4 volumes (v. 1 - 292 pages; v. 2 - 142 pages, v. 3 - 139 pages, v. 4 - 366 pages)
2011
Document 025321
NPC Research Materials
NPC Research (Portland, OR).
“NPC Research provides quality social services evaluation, policy analysis, research, and training.” This website provides information, reports, and evaluations pertaining to a wide range of project areas. Specialty Areas include child abuse and its prevention, community health, criminal justice, drug treatment courts and other problem-solving courts, early childhood and family well-being, juvenile justice, literacy, substance abuse prevention and treatment, and youth development and strengths. ... Read More
WEB
2011
Document 026046
Drug Courts' Effects on Criminal Offendeing for Juveniles and Adults
By Mitchell, Ojmarrh; Wilson, David B.; Eggers, Amy; MacKenzie, Doris L.. Campbell Corporation (Oslo, Norway).
“The objective of this review is to systematically review quasi-experimental and experimental (RCT) evaluations of the effectiveness of drug courts in reducing recidivism, including drug courts for juvenile and DWI offenders. This systematic review critically assesses drug courts’ effects on recidivism in the short- and long-term, the methodological soundness of the existing evidence, and the relationship between drug court features and effectiveness” (p. 6). Sections following an abstract are: ... Read More
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87 pages
2011
Document 026108
Painting the Current Picture: A National Report Card on Drug Courts and Other Problem Solving Court Programs in the United States
By Huddleston, C. West, III; Marlowe, Douglas B.. U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance (Washington, DC); U.S. Executive Office of the President. Office of National Drug Control Policy (Washington, DC). National Drug Court Institute (Alexandria, VA).
Results from the 2009 National Survey on Drug Courts and other Problem Solving Courts are summarized. Sections of this report are: introduction; drug courts—justice done right; what a drug court is; the verdict is in, drug courts work—a review of the scientific literature; 10 key components; survey results—number of drug courts in operation, state-specific growth, dispositional models and which is preferable, drug court capacity, national drug court population, primary substances of abuse among... Read More
PDF
68 p.
2010
Document 026177
Net Benefits of Drug Court
By Downey, P. Mitchell; Roman, John K.. Urban Institute. Justice Policy Center (Washington, DC); Center for Court Innovation (New York, NY); RTI International (Research Triangle Park, NC).
The use of a cost-benefit analysis (CBA) to determine the effectiveness of a drug court program is explained. Topics discussed include: why do a CBA; what a CBA is all about; what a CBA tells us; what a CBA does not tell us; how to do a CBA; quantities—defining the impacts; impacts considered; fining qualities; prices—valuing the impacts—site-specific process; prices—valuing the impacts—national price estimates; results—processing costs; results—criminal justice outcomes; results—other outcomes;... Read More
PDF
16 pages
2010
Document 025099
Research Update on Juvenile Drug Treatment Courts
By Marlowe, Douglas B.. National Association of Drug Court Professionals (Alexandria, VA).
“Research on Juvenile Drug Treatment Courts (JDTCs) has lagged considerably behind that of its adult counterparts. Although evidence is mounting that JDTCs can be effective at reducing delinquency and substance abuse, the field is just beginning to identify the factors that distinguish effective from ineffective programs” (p. 1). Sections of this publication include effectiveness, cost-effectiveness, best practices, and recommendations to drug courts.... Read More
PDF
6 pages
2010
Document 025098
Research Update on Adult Drug Courts
By Marlowe, Douglas B.. National Association of Drug Court Professionals (Alexandria, VA).
The author explains why “[w]e know beyond a reasonable doubt that Drug Courts significantly reduce drug use and crime and do so with substantial cost savings” (p. 1). This publication contains these sections: effectiveness; cost-effectiveness; target population; fidelity to the 10 key components; multidisciplinary team approach; judicial status hearings; drug testing; graduated sanctions and rewards; substance abuse treatment; and recommendations to drug courts.... Read More
PDF
8 pages
2010
Document 025100
Oregon Drug Court Cost Study: Statewide Costs and Promising Practices: Final Report
By Carey, Shannon M.; Waller, Mark S.. Oregon Criminal Justice Commission (Salem, OR). NPC Research (Portland, OR).
Those people interested in the effectiveness of drug courts should read this report. Sections following an executive summary are: introduction; evaluation design; methodology; cross-site results for 20 Oregon drug courts according to cost benefits, best practices, and 10 key components; and summary. For every dollar spent on the drug court there is a net benefit of $1.82, with a net savings to the taxpayer of nearly 57$ million over five years.... Read More
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105 pages
2010
Document 024380
A Multisite Description of Juvenile Drug Courts: Program Models and During-Program Outcomes
By Hiller, Matthew L.; Malluche, Daniel; Bryan, Valerie; DuPont, M. Louise; Martin, Barbara; Abensur, Rebecca; Leukefeld, Carl; Payne, Connie.
Individuals dealing with the development, implementation, and evaluation of juvenile drug courts (JDCs) will find this article interesting. This study is a synthesis of results culled from systematic process evaluations from three JDCs. Results are organized according to program design and structure, target population, therapeutic activities, available resources, initial and long-term goals, other program concerns, arrests, drug use, and retention. Each of the JDCs are “organized along a three-p... Read More
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24 p.
2010
Document 024742
Drug Courts: Background, Effectiveness, and Policy Issues for Congress
By Franco, Celinda. Congressional Research Service (Washington, DC).
Issues related to state drug courts “that may be of interest to Congress if it considers reauthorizing the drug court grant program or other related legislation” are discussed (p. i). In addition to a summary are these sections: introduction; overview of state drug courts—how they work, their effectiveness, and the Federal Drug Court Discretionary Grant Program; issues for Congress—measuring drug court effectiveness, accreditation as a means to improving drug court effectiveness, state drug cour... Read More
PDF
33 pages
2010
Document 024769
Sanctions and Incentives from Operational Drug Courts Throughout the Nation
National Drug Court Institute (Alexandria, VA); National Association of Drug Court Professionals (NADCP) (Alexandria, VA).
This document provides a list of incentives and sanctions for offenders under drug court supervision. The value of this compilation is that it shows incentives for meeting certain terms and conditions of supervision.... Read More
PDF
4 pages
2007
Document 023358
Evidence-Based Practice to Reduce Recidivism: Implications for State Judiciaries
By Warren, Roger K.. National Institute of Corrections. Community Corrections Division (Washington, DC). Crime and Justice Institute (Boston, MA); National Institute of Corrections. Community Corrections Division (Washington, DC).
The reduction of recidivism by state judiciaries utilizing six principles of evidence-based practice (EBP) is explained. Seven sections follow an executive summary: introduction; current state sentencing policies and their consequences; drug courts -- the state judiciary's successful experiment with EBP; the principles of EBP; local sentencing and corrections policy reforms; state sentencing and corrections policy reforms; and conclusion. "[C]arefully targeted rehabilitation and treatment progr... Read More
PDF
77 p.
1999
Document 015448
Drug Courts as a Partner in Mental Health and Co-Occurring Substance Use Disorders Diversion Programs
National Institute of Corrections (Washington, DC); U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services. Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (Rockville, MD); U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services. Center for Mental Health Services (Washington, DC); U.S. Dept. of Justice. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (Washington, DC). National GAINS Center (Delmar, NY).
When compared to other community supervision programs, drug courts provide more comprehensive supervision and more frequent drug testing and monitoring. Drug Courts all have higher rates of retention. Lane County's use of a drug court to improve supervision of participants with co-occurring mental health and substance use disorders in post-booking jail diversion is highlighted.... Read More
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