Back to top

All Library Items

  • Culture, Language, and Access:; Key Considerations for Serving Deaf Survivors of Domestic and Sexual Violence

    Culture, Language, and Access:; Key Considerations for Serving Deaf Survivors of Domestic and Sexual Violence cover
    Culture, Language, and Access:; Key Considerations for Serving Deaf Survivors of Domestic and Sexual Violence

    "Recent research suggests that Deaf women experience higher rates of sexual and domestic violence than their hearing counterparts, but are often shut off from victim services and supports that are ill-equipped to respond to their unique needs. As a result, they are denied access to services that could help them safely flee from abuse, heal from trauma, and seek justice after they have been harmed. This policy brief offers practical suggestions for expanding and enhancing Deaf survivors’ access to victim services and other supports" (website). Sections of this publication include: introduction; the Deaf community in the U.S.; research on victimization is limited; higher rates of domestic and sexual violence; unique experiences of violence; barriers to services and justice; Services for Deaf, by Deaf—a promising strategy; enhancing the capacity of hearing service providers and systems; collaboration between Deaf and hearing programs; five recommendations; and conclusion.

    Document
  • Can Jails and Prisons be Healed?

    Can Jails and Prisons be Healed? cover
    Can Jails and Prisons be Healed?

    This paper expertly describes the Healing Corrections Framework. "The Healing Corrections Framework focuses on the nuts and bolts of the organizational cultures of jails and prisons, how they work, and ways to transform them. It assumes that the primary vehicle for transforming corrections is through meeting the needs of correctional staff to better equip them to work with each other and with those they supervise in jails, prisons, or the community. The logic of this is simple; the work of corrections is done by correctional workers and to change the way corrections works, correctional workers must change how they do their jobs. This will require correctional staff at all levels to communicate with each other and with people under their supervision in more constructive and compassionate ways. In the Healing Corrections framework, “how things are done,” especially how roles and expectations are continuously defined and redefined among the actors within a system, is the working definition of culture" (p. 5). Topics discussed in this document include: capacity versus opportunity; cultural context; cultural fragmentation of systems, the key concept of the Framework, versus coherence; development of the Healing Corrections Framework—its empirical foundation in the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) Prison Culture Project, and the Norval Morris Project, and cycles of engagement and interaction; the Healing Corrections Framework which dialogue as cultural change; Healing Corrections and "mass incarceration"; American culture and American Justice; talking about punishment; and gazing into the abyss. This website provides access to the paper and the presentation slides.

    Document
  • ADA @ 25: Impact and Implications for People with Disabilities Involved in the Justice System [Webinar]

    ADA @ 25: Impact and Implications for People with Disabilities Involved in the Justice System [Webinar] cover
    ADA @ 25: Impact and Implications for People with Disabilities Involved in the Justice System [Webinar]

    If you want an update on how the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) impacts disabled offenders then this webinar is a must view. "While there is still a significant gap regarding our knowledge about people with disabilities and Deaf people involved in the justice system, we do know there is a great need to increase access to justice for these people. People with disabilities and Deaf people experience violent victimization at rates three times higher than people without disabilities, making them one of the groups at highest risk of harm in the country. Despite these high rates of victimization, they continue to experience significant barriers to services and the justice system. These barriers not only exist for victims of violent crime but for people with disabilities and Deaf people who are incarcerated. Research reflects that 36 percent of state and 24 percent of federally incarcerated adults report having at least one disability. These individuals experience accessibility barriers from the time of arrest and through incarceration" (Vera website). "With America in the midst of substantial criminal justice reform and celebrating the 25th Anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), this summit will bring these two issues together. Leaders from both the disability and criminal justice fields will explore the impact the ADA has had on people with disabilities with disabilities who have had involvement with the justice system, either as victims or suspects/offenders. Panelists will also share their visions for justice for people with disabilities for the next 25" (YouTube website). This website provides links to presentations by Senator Harkin and the five panelists. It also has a link to a Fact Sheet (from July 2015) that covers the impact of ADA in disabled offenders. This document has sections about: what we know about justice-involved people with disabilities and deaf people—suspects and offenders, and victims and survivors; the ADA's impact on justice-involved people with disabilities and deaf people—victim service organizations, law enforcement agencies, the courts, and prisons and jails; opportunities at the intersection of access and justice involvement; and additional information about the ADA's five titles, the ADA Amendments Act (ADAAA) of 2008, and Olmstead V L.C. 527 U.S. 581 of 1999.

    Webinar
  • Disabilities Among Prison And Jail Inmates, 2011–12

    Disabilities Among Prison And Jail Inmates, 2011–12 cover
    Disabilities Among Prison And Jail Inmates, 2011–12

    This report presents statistics regarding "the prevalence of disabilities among prison and jail inmates, detailing the prevalence of six specific disability types: hearing, vision, cognitive, ambulatory, self-care, and independent living. Important differences in each type of disability are highlighted by demographic characteristics. The report also assesses the prevalence of disabilities with other health problems, such as a current chronic condition, obesity, ever having an infectious disease, and past 30-day serious psychological distress … Highlights: An estimated 32% of prisoners and 40% of jail inmates reported having at least one disability; Prisoners were nearly 3 times more likely and jail inmates were more than 4 times more likely than the general population to report having at least one disability; About 2 in 10 prisoners and 3 in 10 jail inmates reported having a cognitive disability, the most common reported disability in each population; Female prisoners were more likely than male prisoners to report having a cognitive disability, but were equally likely to report having each of the other five disabilities; Non-Hispanic white prisoners (37%) and prisoners of two or more races (42%) were more likely than non-Hispanic black prisoners (26%) to report having at least one disability; [and] More than half of prisoners (54%) and jail inmates (53%) with a disability reported a co-occurring chronic condition" (website).

    Document
  • Health Correlates of Criminal Justice Involvement in 4,793 Transgender Veterans

    Health Correlates of Criminal Justice Involvement in 4,793 Transgender Veterans cover
    Health Correlates of Criminal Justice Involvement in 4,793 Transgender Veterans

    "Transgender (TG) persons are overrepresented in prison settings and in the U.S. veteran population. Health disparities studies of large populations of transgender people involved with the criminal justice system have not been published to date … "This investigation sought to describe characteristics associated with JI in a sample of veterans with TG identification and to determine whether health disparities exist when compared to non-TG veterans with a JI history" (p. 297, 298). Results are presented regarding: characteristics of TG and non-TG veterans; sample characteristics of justice involved (JI) TG and non-TG veterans; characteristics of justice involved TG and justice involved non-TG veterans; and the effects of TG status and VJP [Veteran Justice Programs] involvement on medical and mental health problems. Findings suggest that TG veterans are more like to be involved with the justice system, to have been homeless at one time or another, and/or experienced sexual assault while serving in the military compared to non-TG JI (justice involved) veterans. TG JI veterans also at increased risk for depression, posttraumatic stress syndrome (PTSD), serious mental illness, suicide, hypertension, and obesity. "These data suggest that TG veterans experience a number of health risks compared to non-TG veterans, including an increased likelihood of justice involvement. TG veterans involved with the criminal justice system are a particularly vulnerable group and services designed to address the health care needs of this population, both while incarcerated and when in the community, should take these findings into account in the development of health screenings and treatment plans" (p. 297).

    Document
  • Money as a Criminal Justice Stakeholder: The Judge’s Decision to Release or Detain a Defendant Pretrial

    Money as a Criminal Justice Stakeholder: The Judge’s Decision to Release or Detain a Defendant Pretrial Cover
    Money as a Criminal Justice Stakeholder: The Judge’s Decision to Release or Detain a Defendant Pretrial

    <p>"The future of pretrial justice in America will come partly from our deliberative focus on our judges’ decisions to release or detain a criminal defendant pretrial and from our questioning of whether our current constitutional and statutory bail schemes are either helping or hindering those decisions … we recognize that we also need a fair and transparent scheme allowing the preventive detention of higher risk defendants without "bail," or judges will continue to be forced to use money to accomplish the same thing, albeit unfairly, non-transparently, and, some would say, unlawfully. A new group of people are now telling us that we can never change our constitution to allow the creation of this scheme, but the fact is that change is inevitable. Indeed, moving from a mostly charge and money-based bail system to one based primarily on empirically-derived risk necessarily means that virtually all American bail laws are antiquated and must be changed … This paper is designed to show a somewhat ideal process for making a release or detain decision, but with the realization that a particular state’s bail laws may hinder that ideal process to a point where best practices are difficult or even impossible to implement. Nevertheless, until we know how the pretrial decision-making process should work (i.e., an in-or-out decision, immediately effectuated), we will never know exactly which changes we must make to further the goals underlying the "bail/no bail" process" (p. 1). Chapters following an executive summary are: introduction; the history and the law related to bail up to the Twentieth Century; how pretrial decision making in the United States got off track; "bail" (release) and "no bail" (detention); the national standards on pretrial release; effective pretrial decision making—risk assessment instruments, and assessing which conditions are effective for their lawful purposes; the practical aspects of making an effective "release/detain" or in-or-out-decision—the three steps of proper purpose, legal assessment, and release or detention result; and conclusion.</p>

    Document
  • Fundamentals of Bail: A Resource Guide for Pretrial Practitioners and a Framework for American Pretrial Reform

    Fundamentals of Bail: A Resource Guide for Pretrial Practitioners and a Framework for American Pretrial Reform cover
    Fundamentals of Bail: A Resource Guide for Pretrial Practitioners and a Framework for American Pretrial Reform

    "Pretrial justice requires that those seeking it be consistent with both their vision and with the concept of pretrial best practices, and this document is designed to help further that goal. It can be used as a resource guide, giving readers a basic understanding of the key areas of bail and the criminal pretrial process and then listing key documents and resources necessary to adopt a uniform working knowledge of legal and evidence-based practices in the field. Hopefully, however, this document will serve as more than just a paper providing mere background information, for it is designed, instead, to also provide the intellectual framework to finally achieve pretrial justice in America … in this country we have undertaken two generations of pretrial reform, and we are currently in a third. The lessons we have learned from the first two generations are monumental, but we have not fully implemented them, leading to the need for some “grand unifying theory” to explore how this third generation can be our last. In my opinion, that theory comes from a solid consensus understanding of the fundamentals of bail, why they are important, and how they work together toward an idea of pretrial justice that all Americans can embrace" (p. 4). Sections following an executive summary are; introduction—what bail and bond are; why we need pretrial improvements; the history of bail; legal foundations of pretrial justice; pretrial research; national standards on pretrial release; pretrial terms and phrases; application—guidelines for pretrial reform; and conclusion.

    Document
  • Victim Impact: Listen and Learn: An Evaluation of the Effects of the Victim Impact: Listen and Learn Program on Prisoner Recidivism and Prisoner Behavior

    Victim Impact: Listen and Learn: An Evaluation of the Effects of the Victim Impact: Listen and Learn Program on Prisoner Recidivism and Prisoner Behavior cover
    Victim Impact: Listen and Learn: An Evaluation of the Effects of the Victim Impact: Listen and Learn Program on Prisoner Recidivism and Prisoner Behavior

    "This is a report of the evaluation study conducted to examine the effects of the Victim Impact: Listen and Learn program on the behaviors of the prisoners who attended this program. The focus of the data we collected and reported on was on the participants’ behaviors after attending the program but while still in prison, and upon release from prison … The central tenet of the program is that a vital component to facilitating change within an individual offender is a focus on the victims of crime, and the impact of a crime on the victim" (p. 1). Victim Impact has been implemented in the Delaware prison system since 2011. Some of the findings form this study include: participants has a recidivism rate (re-offense and re-commitment) of 35 % compared to 67% for non-participants; and participants had a 33% reduction in disciplinary charges. Thus, Victim Impact reduces recidivism and can provide significant cost savings.

    Document
  • Developing and Implementing a PREA-Compliant Staffing Plan [Webinar]

    Developing and Implementing a PREA-Compliant Staffing Plan [Webinar] cover
    Developing and Implementing a PREA-Compliant Staffing Plan [Webinar]

    This webinar is a great introduction for "correctional practitioners to a new resource for developing a PREA-compliant staffing plan, per standard §115.13/.113/.213/.313 … Topics for this webinar will include: Recommendations for approaching or improving a staffing plan with consideration of influencing factors; Facility-specific PREA requirements; Appropriate staff that should be involved in assessing and drafting the staffing plan; and Special considerations including the use of video monitoring, staffing ratios in juvenile facilities, supervision of vulnerable populations, and gender-specific considerations" (website). The webinar agenda is: welcome and opening remarks; background and context; introduction to the Staffing Plan Resource Guide; staffing plan requirements; influencing factors; how to develop a staffing plan; video monitoring, juvenile ratios, and gender; how a staffing plan will be audited; and question and answer period.

    Webinar
  • Census Of Jails: Population Changes, 1999–2013

    Census Of Jails: Population Changes, 1999–2013 cover
    Census Of Jails: Population Changes, 1999–2013

    This report presents "state-level estimates of the number of inmates confined in local jails at year end 2013, by sex, race, and Hispanic origin. This report provides information on changes in the incarceration rate, average daily population, admissions, expected length of stay, rated capacity, percent of capacity occupied, and inmate-to-correctional officer ratios. It also includes statistics, by jurisdiction size, on the number of inmates confined to jail and persons admitted to jail during 2013. It features a special section on the 12 facilities that functioned as jails for the Federal Bureau of Prisons. Highlights: From 1999 to 2013, the number of inmates in local jails increased by 21%, from 605,943 to 731,570 [while] During this period, the growth in the jail population was not steady, as the jail confined population peaked in 2008 at 785,533 then declined to its 2013 level; The adult jail incarceration rates changed slightly between midyear 1999 (304 [per 100,000 adult U.S. residents]) and yearend 2013 (310 [per 100,000 adult U.S. residents]); Nearly half (46%) of all local jail inmates were confined in jurisdictions holding 1,000 or more inmates in 2013, down slightly from 50% in 2006; Between 1999 and yearend 2013, the female inmate population increased by 48%, from approximately 68,100 to 100,940. The male inmate population increased by 17%, from approximately 537,800 to 630,620; [and] The juvenile population (persons age 17 or younger) held in adult jail facilities in 2013 (4,420) decreased by more than half from its peak in 1999 (9,458).

    Web Page
  • Veterans In Prison And Jail, 2011–2012

    Veterans In Prison And Jail, 2011–2012 cover
    Veterans In Prison And Jail, 2011–2012

    This report presents "counts and rates of veterans in state and federal prison and local jail in 2011 and 2012. This report describes incarcerated veterans by demographic characteristics, military characteristics, and disability and mental health status. It describes current offense, sentencing, and criminal history characteristics by veteran status. It also examines combat experience associated with lifetime mental health disorders among incarcerated veterans … Highlights: The number of veterans incarcerated in state and federal prison and local jail decreased from 203,000 in 2004 to 181,500 in 2011–12; The total incarceration rate in 2011–12 for veterans (855 per 100,000 veterans in the United States) was lower than the rate for nonveterans (968 per 100,000 U.S. residents); Non-Hispanic black and Hispanic inmates made up a significantly smaller proportion of incarcerated veterans (38% in prison and 44% in jail), compared to incarcerated non-Hispanic black and Hispanic nonveterans (63% in prison and 59% in jail); A greater percentage of veterans (64%) than nonveterans (48%) were sentenced for violent offenses; [and] An estimated 43% of veterans and 55% of nonveterans in prison had four or more prior arrests."

    Document
  • Stress and Corrections: Addressing the Safety and Well-Being of Correctional Officers

    Stress and Corrections: Addressing the Safety and Well-Being of Correctional Officers cover
    Stress and Corrections: Addressing the Safety and Well-Being of Correctional Officers

    "Pubmed is an Internet search engine used to access millions of articles in biomedical and life science literature … only 23 articles are identified when searching “correctional officers (COs) and health.” This article is a snapshot of ongoing work and a growing national consortium of individuals interested in advancing the well-being of Cos" (p. 1). Sections cover : hazards of corrections work; stress is hazardous to your heart; ways to improve well-being; first National Symposium on Corrections Worker Health; and conclusion. "The review of CO stressors concluded that, while there are local efforts and recommended best practices, there are no proven effective safety and health programs for COs, and more studies are needed" (p. 4).

    Document
  • Solutions: American Leaders Speak Out on Criminal Justice

    Solutions: American Leaders Speak Out on Criminal Justice cover
    Solutions: American Leaders Speak Out on Criminal Justice

    "To truly reduce mass incarceration, we need a national conversation, led by national voices, offering national solutions. In this book, the Brennan Center asked the country’s leading public figures and criminal justice experts to offer practical solutions. They responded by writing essays putting forth a variety of proposals to tackle the problem of overincarceration from differing perspectives … They share a commitment to continued progress in the fight against crime — and continued progress toward a more just society. The 22 solutions offered here will not fix the problem on their own. It is our hope that lawmakers and stakeholders implement these ideas to produce a system that both reduces crime and reduces mass incarceration" (p. 2). These solutions are presented by Democrats, Independents, and Republicans some of them being saving jail for the most dangerous, implementing a real mental health system, graduated reentry, abolishing the death penalty while investing in public safety, restoring fairness in sentencing, reducing the number of crimes, mercy--especially for the mentally ill, and getting offenders ready for work.

    Document
  • Maltreatment of Youth in U.S. Juvenile Corrections Facilities: An Update

    Maltreatment of Youth Cover
    Maltreatment of Youth in U.S. Juvenile Corrections Facilities: An Update

    "This report, released as a follow-up to No Place For Kids [2011], introduces new evidence on the widespread maltreatment of youth in state-funded juvenile corrections facilities. It tells of high rates of sexual victimization, the heavy-handed use of disciplinary isolation and a growing roster of states where confined youth have been subject to widespread abuse. The four-year update is in — and the news is not good." Sections of this report include: introduction and summary; findings from "No Place for Kids" on the nature, breadth, and extent of maltreatment and abuse in juvenile correctional agencies; new information about maltreatment in state-funded juvenile corrections facilities—additional states with proven maltreatment, recidivist states, and new evidence of and attention to maltreatment; and conclusion. This website also provides to access to: evidence of maltreatment in each individual state; national news release; "State-by-State Summary of Maltreatment" publication; and the blog entry "New Report Documents Continuing Maltreatment of Incarcerated Youth".

    Document
  • The High Costs of Low Risk: The Crisis of America's Aging Prison Population

    The High Costs of Low Risk: The Crisis of America's Aging Prison Population cover
    The High Costs of Low Risk: The Crisis of America's Aging Prison Population

    "The immense costs of incarceration have increasingly framed the conversation around reducing the prison population as a matter of fiscal responsibility and budgetary necessity. This discussion is often centered around reducing the arrest and prosecution of so-called “non-violent drug offenders.” But these issues belie a much more pressing human and economic concern: the aging prison population, whose costs for incarceration and care will soon prove unsustainable if meaningful action is not taken. And though prison is expensive, cost is far from the only justification to move away from our reliance on incarceration, as the continued long-term incarceration of aging citizens has serious moral, ethical, public health, and public safety implications" (p. 1). This paper explains how agencies might go about effectively addressing these issues. Sections following an executive summary address: the threat facing the United States—economic costs, health impact, strain on correctional systems, social costs and public safety, and the roots of the crisis; from the inside out—meeting the needs of the aging within prisons—six innovative programs; the question of parole; the reentry experience—five viable strategies; the work to be done within correctional facilities, release mechanisms, and post-release services; and toward a new paradigm of punishment. "The interconnected complexity of the aging prisoner crisis demands a strategic response that is versatile and multifaceted, and that seeks to address the issue at multiple points of intervention with involvement from all stakeholders. The fields of gerontology, philanthropy, health, and corrections are uniquely positioned and qualified collectively to inform and implement both short- and long-term solutions to this issue. Armed with critical interdisciplinary knowledge and backed by investment from the philanthropic community, such a collaborative partnership possesses unparalleled opportunity to make lasting contributions to the policies and best practices affecting the aging prison population. This joint stakeholder alliance is particularly well-suited to enrich the reentry process, first by identifying those factors that formerly incarcerated elders need to thrive upon their release to the community and subsequently creating resources and pathways for success. Such an approach would not only yield tremendous cost savings, improved public health outcomes, and economic growth, but would also embody a commitment to human rights—including the freedom for our elders to live the remainder of their lives within their communities and to die with grace in the presence of friends and family" (p. 14-15).

    Document
  • LGBT Youth in Juvenile Justice: Creating Agency Policies for an Equitable System Webinar

    LGBT Youth in Juvenile Justice: Creating Agency Policies for an Equitable System Webinar cover
    LGBT Youth in Juvenile Justice: Creating Agency Policies for an Equitable System Webinar

    Many juvenile justice systems don't know how many young people in their system identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) and often lack appropriate policies that meet their unique needs … This webinar discussed the need for agency policies to support LGBT young people in the juvenile justice system. Participants learned how the Massachusetts Department of Youth Services [DYS] and Santa Clara County Probation Department [SCCPD] developed policies for LGBT youth in their system, as well as different strategies for creating similar policies in state- and county-based systems (website). This zip file contains: SCCPD Stakeholder Invitation; SCCPD Transgender Procedure Guidelines; SCCPD Transgender Preference Form; SCCPD Cultural Competence Form; Santa Clara, County Counsel Memorandum; Massachusetts DYS Official Policy; and presentation slides.

    Webinar
  • Policy Review and Development Guide: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Persons in Custodial Settings, 2nd Edition

    Policy Review and Development Guide: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Persons in Custodial Settings, 2nd Edition cover
    Policy Review and Development Guide: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Persons in Custodial Settings, 2nd Edition

    "In the first edition of this guide, we aimed to reach out to correctional agencies in order to help them identify, address, and respond to abuse of LGBTI individuals through agency policies and procedures. We hoped to deepen the dialogue between staff and administrators as well as community leaders and criminal justice advocates about strategies to eliminate abuse of LGBTI individuals in custody. The second edition of this guide provides updated key information to correctional agencies about PREA’s impact on agency practice as it relates to LGBTI individuals in custody" (p. 1). This guide is made up of three chapters: introduction and overview—introduction, evolving terminology and definitions, core principles for understanding LGBTI individuals in custody, and emerging data on LGBTI individuals in custodial settings and the challenges they face; LGBTI youth under custodial supervision—the law, PREA standards, other governing principles (state human rights laws and professional codes of ethics), and elements of legally sound and effective policy and practice; and LGBTI adults under custodial supervision—the law, PREA standards, and elements of legally sound and effective policy and practice. Appendixes provide: glossary; case law digest; additional resources; webpages with sample policies; Issues to Watch: The Impact of Non-Custodial LGBTI Developments on Corrections; sample policies; and training matrices.

    Document
  • Why do rates of sexual assault prevalence vary from report to report?

    Why do rates of sexual assault prevalence vary from report to report? cover
    Why do rates of sexual assault prevalence vary from report to report?

    "All crime data have flaws, but sexual assault data are notoriously inaccurate. Why are these data so problematic? And what are the consequences for how we address sexual violence in the United States? Data on rape and sexual assault suffer from inconsistent estimates and underreporting, leading to misunderstandings about the extent of the problem and adequate policy solutions. Let’s look at two major sources of information on the topic: survey-based studies that estimate prevalence of sexual assaults and criminal justice system data. In this post, we look at data on female victims of sexual violence, since most existing reports and statistics focus on women. Data on sexual assault against men are especially sparse; we know even less about the experiences of male victims" (p. 1). Sections cover: two different surveys, two different stories—National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) and the National Intimate Partner Sexual Violence Survey (NISVS); and why criminal justice data can be misleading.

    Web Page
  • Reaching In: A Handbook for the Families of Parents Incarcerated in Wisconsin

    Reaching In: A Handbook for the Families of Parents Incarcerated in Wisconsin cover
    Reaching In: A Handbook for the Families of Parents Incarcerated in Wisconsin

    "More than 2 million children have a parent currently in prison or jail, and 10 million more have experienced incarceration of one or both parents as some time in their lives. The incarcerated parent, the child, and the child’s caregiver all suffer as a result of the separation. The longer the parent and child are separated, the more likely they are to grow apart. The imprisonment of a parent often causes a family’s financial and living situations to get worse … Studies have shown that communication and interest in each others’ lives reduces the harmful effects of incarceration and the child’s chances of following his parent into prison. Staying connected helps both the child and the offender to grow, learn and change. After the offender’s prison time is served, the move back to the home is easier for both the parent and the children when communication remains constant. There is less fear, less “catching up” to do, less bad feelings, more communication, more helping the child to heal, and less chance of continuing the cycle of incarceration" (p. 2). This handbook is designed to help the caregiver and child(ren) deal with an parents' incarceration. Sections contained in this publication are: introduction; coping with incarceration; helping children stay connected; encouraging children's education; family finances—child support and health insurance; returning home; and help for incarcerated parents and caregivers.

    Document
  • Reducing Recidivism and Improving Other Outcomes for Young Adults in the Juvenile and Adult Criminal Justice Systems

    Reducing Recidivism and Improving Other Outcomes for Young Adults in the Juvenile and Adult Criminal Justice Systems cover
    Reducing Recidivism and Improving Other Outcomes for Young Adults in the Juvenile and Adult Criminal Justice Systems

    This brief, from the CSG Justice Center, is designed to help state and local officials better support young adults in the justice system. It identifies these young adults’ distinct needs, summaries the limited research available on what works to address these needs, and provides recommendations for steps that policymakers, juvenile and adult criminal justice agency leaders, researchers, and the field can take to improve outcomes" (website). Part I—How Young Adults Are Developmentally Different from Youth and Older Adults: how young adults are distinct from youth; how young adults are distinct from adults; and young adults by the numbers--arrest rates, incarceration rates, and recidivism rates. Part II—Opportunities and Challenges to Meeting Young Adults' Needs: young adults under justice system supervision have distinct needs and few programs exist that are proven to effectively meet these needs—criminal thinking and behavior, education, employment, mental health and substance use, and transition to independence; young adults face systemic barriers to meeting their needs—aging out of protective networks and lack of coordination across service systems, and collateral consequences. Part III—Recommendations: four recommendations; and promising models for young adults under justice system supervision—Multisystemic Therapy for Emerging Adults (MST-EA), and the Roca nonprofit organization in Massachusetts; and increasing cross-systems coordination to improve outcomes for young adults in Iowa—the Iowa Collaboration for Youth Development (ICYD).

    Document
  • Reducing Juvenile Recidivism Interactive Checklists

     › Reducing Juvenile Recidivism Interactive Checklists cover
    Reducing Juvenile Recidivism Interactive Checklists

    "These interactive checklists can help state and local officials to assess whether their juvenile justice system’s policies and practices are aligned with the research on “what works” to reduce recidivism and to identify opportunities for improvement" (website). There are three checklists each designed for a particular audience: Checklist for Juvenile Justice Agency Leaders and Managers; Ten Key Questions Judges Can Ask to Improve Outcomes for Youth in the Juvenile Justice System; and Three Key Steps Policymakers Can Take to Improve Outcomes for Youth in the Juvenile Justice System.

    Web Page
  • Hazmat Suit for the Soul

    Hazmat Suit for the Soul, Parts 1-3 cover
    Hazmat Suit for the Soul

    This three part series addresses the issue of corrections fatigue and how corrections staff can deal with it by developing "hazmat suits for their souls". A hazmat suit for the soul allows you to respond to the "hazardous materials" of daily stress and dangerous incidents during work and to "decontaminate" emotionally afterwards. Part One explains "complex trauma", how it can result in psychological symptoms, diagnostic psychiatric disorders like post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), adverse workplace performance, costs, and neurobiological changes. Part Two compares "negative resilience" and true resilience. It explains the need for corrections staff to seek "solid and enduring resilience is of primary importance, as literally lives may depend on it". Part Three explains how corrections staff can develop effective hazmat suits for the soul using prevention or intervention approaches. This part also describes four "categories of behavior (aka factors)" that can increase resilience in corrections staff. The factors are supportive staff relationship effects; self-care health maintenance efforts; confident/perseverant frame of mind; and controlled/logical problem-solving. NOTE: This set of articles was previously published in 2011, and have been updated and reprinted.

    Web Page
  • Making PREA and victim services accessible for incarcerated people with disabilities: An implementation guide for practitioners on the adult and juvenile standards

    Making PREA and victim services accessible for incarcerated people with disabilities: An implementation guide for practitioners on the adult and juvenile standards cover
    Making PREA and victim services accessible for incarcerated people with disabilities: An implementation guide for practitioners on the adult and juvenile standards

    The Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) sets standards to ensure that information about PREA and victim services are accessible to people with disabilities. The purpose of this guide is to provide strategies to correctional agencies that will aid their compliance with these PREA requirements. The strategies discussed in this guide draw on established practices used by victim service organizations—both community-based and those based in government agencies—to make their services more accessible for this population. By offering concrete recommendations on how to adapt these community practices to correctional settings, this guide aims to help adult and juvenile correctional facilities increase accessibility for people with disabilities. While it is not a focus of this guide, an important component to making PREA and victim services accessible for people with disabilities is to institutionalize any new practices or partnerships in facility policy" (p. 2). Sections comprising this guide are: purpose; defining disability; sexual abuse and incarcerated people with disabilities—applicable PREA standards, and legal compliance; strategies for making PREA information and victim services accessible—increase access for the broadest range of users, increase capacity for individualized accessibility solutions, ensure access to reporting, and ensure access to victim services; staff training and resources; and conclusion.

    Document
  • Are prisons really schools for terrorism? Challenging the rhetoric on prison radicalization

    Are prisons really schools for terrorism? Challenging the rhetoric on prison radicalization cover
    Are prisons really schools for terrorism? Challenging the rhetoric on prison radicalization

    "When governments justify the necessity to segregate and/or isolate terrorist inmates from mainstream prisoners, they commonly raise concerns about their prisons becoming schools for terrorism. Yet, these concerns are often based on limited information about prisoner radicalization, potentially resulting in the mismanagement (both financially and psychologically) of terrorist inmates in many countries. This article challenges contemporary research on prison radicalization and recruitment by highlighting several factors that may hamper these activities to demonstrate why some prison regimes and their programmes for housing terrorist inmates face a greater risk than others. In contrast to other studies, this article concludes that the radicalization and recruitment of mainstream prisoners by terrorist inmates under certain prison conditions is not necessarily a given outcome" (p. 74). Sections of this article include: abstract; introduction; prison case studies—the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, the Philippines, Indonesia, and Pakistan; radicalization and the prison environment; ad conclusion. "This article has provided an alternative perspective to contemporary discussion on prison radicalization, which appears to over-state the threat by viewing all prisons as ‘schools’ or ‘universities’ for terrorism. However, by examining a cross-section of correctional systems, this article has identified several factors that challenge common perceptions about the schools or universities for terrorism theory. It concludes that prison radicalization and recruitment for Islamist militant groups are more the exception than the rule and, when prison radicalization has occurred, the chances of these inmates then being recruited into a terrorist group are slim. In addition, once released, the relationship between these individuals committing acts of terrorism and their time in prison is tenuous at best" (p. 95).

    Document
  • Educational Technology in Corrections, 2015

    Educational Technology in Corrections, 2015 cover
    Educational Technology in Corrections, 2015

    "Technology has transformed the way we approach most daily tasks and activities. It plays a role in how we apply for and perform on a job, communicate with friends and family, access government and other services, manage our finances, and purchase entertainment. Technology also enables our learning … The policies and practices of federal, state, and local corrections agencies, including the juvenile justice system, severely hinder the ability of correctional education programs to enable learning through technology … The primary concern about adopting educational technology in corrections is the potential for security breaches. Other reasons include, but are not limited to, insufficient resources and staff capacity to purchase, implement, maintain, and monitor advanced technologies … This report is designed to inform federal, state, and local corrections and correctional education administrators as they explore ways to securely and cost effectively provide advanced technologies in corrections facilities to help strengthen and expand educational and reentry services. It describes the current status of these technologies in corrections, existing and emerging approaches to providing such services in facilities, and the successes and challenges of early implementers. The report concludes with a set of recommendations that align with the National Education Technology Plan’s five overarching goals" (p. 1-3). Sections of this report include: introduction; overview; current status of advanced technologies in corrections; mobile device vendors providing educational technology in corrections; successes and challenges of early implementers; international use of technology in correctional education delivery; recommendations for adopting educational technology in corrections; information technology terminology; and the Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction's Policy on Internet Access to Prisoners.

    Document
  • The Effect of Conjugal Visitation on Sexual Violence in Prison

    The Effect of Conjugal Visitation on Sexual Violence in Prison cover
    The Effect of Conjugal Visitation on Sexual Violence in Prison

    The impact of conjugal visitation on prison sexual assaults is investigated. Sections following an abstract include: introduction; theories about the causes of sexual violence—dominance, or sexual gratification; conjugal visitation and sexual offending in violence; data; findings regarding the increase in prison sexual violence due to prison population growth, and the impact of conjugal visitation on inmate sexual offending; and conclusion. Those states that allow conjugal visits have a significantly lower number of reported prison rape and other sexual violence in their prisons.

    Document
  • Reentry Skills Building Handbook, 2015

    Reentry Skills Building Handbook, 2015 cover
    Reentry Skills Building Handbook, 2015

    While specifically designed for Georgia, this handbook's format is a great example of an offender reentry handbook. It is based upon the Template from the Minnesota Department of Corrections. Sections following a "GDC Offender Reentry Model" flowchart include: introduction—getting organized; identification; housing; employment; careers; programs inside GDC; work ethics; transportation; money management; education; incarcerated veterans program; selective service; applying for Social Security; health and life skills; mental health services; alcohol, other drugs (AOD), and recovery; family and friend relationships; child support; living under supervision; and Georgia specific community resource contact information.

    Document
  • Probation And Parole In The United States, 2014

    Probation And Parole In The United States, 2014 cover
    Probation And Parole In The United States, 2014

    This report presents "data on adult offenders under community supervision while on probation or parole in 2014. The report presents trends over time for the overall community supervision population and describes changes in the probation and parole populations. It provides statistics on the number of offenders entering and exiting probation and parole and the mean time served as well as national-level data on the distribution of offenders on probation or parole by sex, race or Hispanic origin, most serious offense type, and status of supervision. It also presents outcomes of supervision, including the rate at which offenders completed their term of supervision or were returned to incarceration. Appendix tables include jurisdiction-level information on the population counts and number of entries and exits for probation and parole; jurisdiction-level information on the types of entries and exits for parole. Some highlights include: the number of adults under community supervision (both in parole and probation) declined; about 1 in 52 adults in the United States was under community supervision; and the adult probation population decreased, while the adult parole population increased.

    Document
  • Battle Scars: Military Veterans and the Death Penalty

    Battle Scars: Military Veterans and the Death Penalty cover
    Battle Scars: Military Veterans and the Death Penalty

    "In many respects, veterans in the United States are again receiving the respect and gratitude they deserve for having risked their lives and served their country. Wounded soldiers are welcomed home, and their courage in starting a new and difficult journey in civilian life is rightly applauded. But some veterans with debilitating scars from their time in combat have received a very different reception … Veterans with Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) who have committed heinous crimes present hard cases for our system of justice. The violence that occasionally erupts into murder can easily overcome the special respect that is afforded most veterans. However, looking away and ignoring this issue serves neither veterans nor victims … This report is not a definitive study of all the veterans who have been sentenced to death in the modern era of capital punishment. Rather, it is a wake-up call to the justice system and the public at large: As the death penalty is being questioned in many areas, it should certainly be more closely scrutinized when used against veterans with PTSD and other mental disabilities stemming from their service. Recognizing the difficult challenges many veterans face after their service should warrant a close examination of the punishment of death for those wounded warriors who have committed capital crimes. Moreover, a better understanding of the disabilities some veterans face could lead to a broader conversation about the wide use of the death penalty for others suffering from severe mental illness" (p. 2, 3). This report provides this information. These sections follow an executive summary: introduction; scope of the problem—veterans sentenced to death, prevalence of PTSD and other disorders, and mental illness, PTSD, and the death penalty; areas of concern in capital cases—veterans already executed (some individual profiles), condemned veterans—not executed (a few profiles), and future cases; what can be done; and conclusion.

    Document
  • The Growth of Veterans Treatment Courts [Podcast]

    The Growth of Veterans Treatment Courts [Podcast] cover
    The Growth of Veterans Treatment Courts [Podcast]

    "Veterans Treatment Courts are one of the fastest growing criminal justice programs in the United States. Since 9/11, more than 2.5 million Americans have served our country in uniform. Many of them have deployed several times. And many of these men and women in uniform are coming home and struggling not only with the physical wounds of war, but also its “invisible” wounds: post-traumatic stress disorder and traumatic brain injury. Since the inception of the first Veterans Treatment Court by Judge Robert Russell in Buffalo, NY in 2008, there are now more than 300 veterans treatment courts across the country. These courts account for veterans’ military service and provide diversion and treatment alternatives specific to their needs. The development of a screening tool specific to veterans is now underway through partnership between the National Institute of Corrections (NIC), the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) and the Center for Court Innovation (CCI). The assessment tool factors in the latest research on trauma and will support an accompanying case planning protocol. This Veterans Treatment Court Enhancement Initiative is a three-year project that will include implementing the tool and protocol in two pilot sites. The pilot site solicitation opportunity will be released in November 2015."

    Audio
  • The Importance of Information Sharing for Justice Reform

    The Importance of Information Sharing for Justice Reform cover
    The Importance of Information Sharing for Justice Reform

    "Policymakers at all levels of government in the United States are increasingly turning toward alternatives to incarceration and pretrial detention. The aim is to decrease the cost of the criminal justice system, while reducing recidivism and improving outcomes for people accused of and convicted of criminal behavior. There is great promise in “justice reinvestment”: that society can save money and improve public safety by detaining and incarcerating fewer people and redirecting a portion of the savings to more effective supervised treatment, training, and other programming in the community. Fulfilling this promise, though, requires that those who make policy for, and allocate funding to, justice reform initiatives recognize the importance of making timely, accurate information available to the front-line practitioners—probation and parole officers, treatment providers and healthcare professionals, and the organizations providing services and programs to people under supervision. Without this flow of information, justice reform will likely fall far short of policymakers’ and citizens’ expectations, and may in the end neither reduce expenditures nor improve public safety" (p. 1). The following sections of this report explain how information sharing positively impacts justice reform by: making better decisions; ensuring accountability; providing efficient services; understanding an investing in what works; and by building on what exists. Each section also includes experiences from the field that support the information sharing initiatives.

    Document
  • Offender Risk & Needs Assessment Instruments: A Primer for Courts

    Offender Risk & Needs Assessment Instruments: A Primer for Courts cover
    Offender Risk & Needs Assessment Instruments: A Primer for Courts

    "Practitioners use risk assessment information to inform decisions at various points in the criminal justice system. The Primer is written for judges, policy makers, and other practitioners interested in the use of RNA [risk and needs assessment] information at sentencing for the purpose of informing community corrections related decisions regarding management and reduction of offender recidivism risk. It focuses on RNA instruments designed specifically to inform these community corrections-related decisions" (p. 2). This publication explains: what risk and needs assessment instruments are, and reasons for using them; examples of six risk and needs assessment instruments and how they differ; what the qualities of good risk and needs assessment instruments are; the practices which support sound implementation of risk and needs assessment instruments; and the practical considerations in selecting and using risk and needs assessment instruments. An appendix provides profiles of risk and needs assessment instruments.

    Document
  • Using Risk and Needs Assessment Information at Sentencing: Observations from Ten Jurisdictions

    Using Risk and Needs Assessment Information at Sentencing: Observations from Ten Jurisdictions cover
    Using Risk and Needs Assessment Information at Sentencing: Observations from Ten Jurisdictions

    "RNA [risk and needs assessment] instruments are actuarial tools designed to inform community corrections-related decisions regarding risk management and reduction. They consist, in part, of static factors such as criminal history and age at first offense which are related to recidivism but cannot be altered through the delivery of services or treatment programs. In addition, and more importantly for recidivism reduction purposes, the tools identify dynamic risk factors (sometimes referred to as criminogenic needs) such as antisocial attitudes and antisocial peer groups that also are related to recidivism but can be addressed through services and treatment programs. Information from these tools assists in identifying specific offender risk factors that can be targeted with services and treatment programs in order to help reduce an offender’s likelihood of reoffending … Several jurisdictions now provide RNA information to the court to inform sentencing decisions as part of a broader evidence-based approach to effective risk management and recidivism reduction … The current report synthesizes the information across the ten jurisdictions and provides examples of how and the degree to which jurisdictions have implemented each of the nine guiding principles" (p. 1, 2, 3). Sections comprising this report are: Introduction; Guiding Principle 1: Public Safety/Risk Management Purpose; Guiding Principle 2: Amenability to Probation; Guiding Principle 3: Effective Conditions of Probation and Responses to Violations; Guiding Principle 4: Stakeholder Training; Guiding Principle 5: Availability and Routine Use of Offender Assessments; Guiding Principle 6: Evidence-Based Infrastructure; Guiding Principle 7: Assessment Instruments; Guiding Principle 8: Assessment Reports; Guiding Principle 9: Monitoring and Evaluation.; The Way Forward: Judicial Leadership and Lessons Learned; Conclusion; and Appendix: Jurisdiction Profiles. This report is accompanies "Using Offender Risk and Needs Assessment Information at Sentencing: Guidance for Courts from a National Working Group" - NICIC accession no. 026663.

    Document
  • States of Women's Incarceration: The Global Context

    States of Women's Incarceration: The Global Context cover
    States of Women's Incarceration: The Global Context

    If you want an easy to understand and concise source of information about female incarceration within the U.S. and the throughout the world, then this report is for you. It is a must read for correctional professionals, policymakers, advocates, and community members. "We already know that when it comes to incarceration … the United States incarcerates 716 people for every 100,000 residents, more than any other country. Worldwide, and within the U.S., the vast majority of those incarcerated are men. As a result, women's incarceration rates are overshadowed and often lost in the data. As a first step in documenting how women fare in the world's carceral landscape, this report compares the incarceration rates for women of each U.S. state with the equivalent rates for countries around the world." Sections of this report including a few of the findings are: introduction; outpacing the world—while the U.S. has only 5% of the world's female population, it holds close to 30% of the world's incarcerated females, very close to the total in Thailand, twice that of China, and four times that of Russia; World Women's Incarceration Rate if Every U.S. State Were a Country" infographic—the top 44 jurisdictions are states in the U.S.; outpacing our peers—among NATO countries the U.S. incarceration rate is eight times that of the closet ally Portugal, with Rhode Island with the lowest female incarceration rate in the U.S. is still twice that of Portugal and overall 15th in the world; outpacing ourselves; and conclusion. "The statistics revealed by this report are simple and staggering. They suggest that states cannot remain complacent about how many women they incarcerate. Women should be a mainstay of any state policy discussions on the economical and effective use of incarceration if we hope to incarcerate fewer women."

    Web Page
  • Prison Parenting Programs: Resources for Parenting Instructors in Prisons and Jails

    › Prison Parenting Programs: Resources for Parenting Instructors in Prisons and Jails cover
    Prison Parenting Programs: Resources for Parenting Instructors in Prisons and Jails

    This is a great resource for those correctional educators wanting to improve or start parenting programs. "The resources in this handbook are grouped according to the predominant focus of the program. Those programs comprised of several components are listed in the Multi-Faceted Programs section" (p. 2). Sections of this document include: multi-faceted programs; parenting skills programs; family support programs; parent/child book reading programs; re-entry programs; handbooks for incarcerated parents and their families; books on incarcerated parents and their families; videos on incarcerated parents and their families; and newsletters for parenting educators in correctional facilities.

    Document
  • A Tribal Probation Officers Guide to Working with Victims

    A Tribal Probation Officers Guide to Working with Victims cover
    A Tribal Probation Officers Guide to Working with Victims

    "While victims are not the primary client for you as a tribal probation officer [TPO], you are in a unique position to provide them with critical information and link them with services. This bulletin is designed to provide TPOs with a brief overview of victims’ rights, tips to help coordinate and improve the delivery of victim services, and information about the varied services available to victims of crime" (p. 3). Sections of this publication cover: why tribal probation officers should be concerned about crime victims; the impact of crime on victims; eight specific victims' rights under federal law; barriers to victim participation in criminal and tribal justice processes; victims' rights and related services—safety and reasonable protection, confidentiality, notification and information, participation, victim input, restitution and other legal/financial obligations (LFOs), and victim compensation; effective communication with victims; collaboration for victims' rights implementation and victim assistance services—federal victim services, tribal victim services, and state and local victim services; services for crime victims and survivors; National Information and Referral Resources for Crime Victim/Survivor Assistance—20 national toll-free information, assistance, and referral numbers; and victim/offender and restorative justice programs.

    Document
  • Studying Deterrence Among High-Risk Adolescents

    Studying Deterrence Among High-Risk Adolescents cover
    Studying Deterrence Among High-Risk Adolescents

    The impact of sanctions, whether threatened or applied, on deterrence of crime by high-risk adolescents is examined. Sections of this bulletin include: background; key terms; increasing deterrence through severity—institutional placement and length of stay; increasing deterrence through certainty—offenders' perceptions of risk; increasing certainty though arrest; behavioral responses to changes in risk perceptions—the certainty effect; the deterrent effect of ambiguity in offender risk perceptions; policy implications; and conclusion. Some of the results are: There was no meaningful reduction in offending or arrests in response to more severe punishment (e.g., correctional placement, longer stays); Policies targeting specific types of offending may be more effective at deterring youth from engaging in these specific offenses as opposed to general policies aimed at overall crime reduction; In response to an arrest, youth slightly increased their risk perceptions, which is a necessary condition for deterrence; Creating ambiguity about detection probabilities in certain areas or for certain types of crime may have a deterrent effect by enhancing the perceived risk of getting caught" (p. 1).

    Document
  • Predictive Analytics in Health Care and Criminal Justice: Three Case Studies

    Predictive Analytics in Health Care and Criminal Justice: Three Case Studies cover
    Predictive Analytics in Health Care and Criminal Justice: Three Case Studies

    "Organizations in both the health care and criminal justice fields have been using predictive analytics for a while, but predictive analytics are just beginning to be used in what may best be described as the hybrid field of health care and criminal justice. Predictive analytics are deployed in this hybrid field to anticipate the health needs of the justice-involved, and use this information to treat mental illness as well as other health problems. The underlying assumption is that these pre-emptive actions will reduce the risk of reoffending and reincarceration and thereby promote public safety. In the field of criminal justice, predictive analytics have already been shown to increase public safety through crime prevention" (p. 1). This issue paper presents three case studies showing how predictive analytics is being used by hybrid health and criminal justice systems. The case studies are: the Otsuka Digital Health (ODH) platform in Miami-Dade County used to divert the mentally ill from the local justice system; the utilization of Impact Pro by Centurion (the correctional health care provider for the states of Tennessee, Minnesota, Massachusetts, and Vermont) to treat incarcerated individuals; and the web-based RNR Simulation Tool which generates evidence-based treatment recommendations for the offender.

    Document
  • Training Curriculum on Women and Imprisonment, Version 1.0

    Training Curriculum on Women and Imprisonment, Version 1.0 cover
    Training Curriculum on Women and Imprisonment, Version 1.0

    "This training curriculum, together with the UNODC Handbook on Women and Imprisonment, aims to assist legislators, policymakers, prison managers, staff and non-governmental organizations to acquire knowledge and skills to address the gender-specific needs of women prisoners and to explore and utilize ways to reduce their unnecessary imprisonment, in line with the provisions of the Bangkok Rules" (p. 9). The twelve modules comprising this training program are: identifying the needs of women prisoners and addressing discrimination; admission, registration, and allocation; health care; safety and security; contact with the outside world; prisoner rehabilitation; pregnant women and women with children in prison; special categories of women prisoners; preparation for release and post-release support; staff working with women prisoners; research, planning, and evaluation; and non-custodial measures. Appendixes cover: handout materials for participants; test questions and answers; training of trainers—background material; background on mental health and related issues in prisons; and End-of-Workshop Evaluation.

    Document
  • Promising and Innovative Practices for Children of Incarcerated Parents: [Webinar]

    Practices for Children of Incarcerated Parents: Arrest through Pre-Adjudication [Webinar] cover
    Promising and Innovative Practices for Children of Incarcerated Parents: [Webinar]

    Nearly three million children under the age of 18 have a parent in jail or prison, and millions more have experienced their parents being arrested. Due to their parent’s criminal justice involvement, a growing body of research indicates that these children often experience trauma, family disruption, and the loss of their primary caregiver, which can lead to financial hardship, residential instability, and an array of emotional and behavioral problems.

    In response, several community-based organizations and government agencies across the country have implemented programs and practices aimed at reducing this trauma and mitigating the potentially harmful outcomes associated with parental criminal justice involvement. The Urban Institute and the National Institute of Corrections hosted a live webinar highlighting these promising and innovative programs and practices.

    This webinar is four sessions: Parental Arrest Protocols—"Focuses on protocols that police departments can use to manage the arrest of a parent to minimize the trauma and harm to their children"; Family Impact Statements—"Focuses on how probation departments can use family impact statements in their presentence investigation reports to account for the needs of family and children"; Family-Focused Jail Services—"Focuses on a few family-focused programs and services that jail administrators can offer to parents in their jails to help them stay connected to their family and children"; and Successful Collaboration—"Provides information on how to collaboratively think about and address the many issues facing children of incarcerated parents, using a diverse group of interested stakeholders". Presentation slides for these sessions are provided. Access is also provided to four publications "that complement the webinar sessions and aim to guide criminal justice organizations and stakeholders in developing and implementing promising practices for children of justice-involved parents. The products include three toolkits on parental arrest policies, family-focused jail programs, and family impact statements, as well as a framework document that synthesizes what we have learned about promising practices and provides information about the context surrounding children and their families. The products provide key challenges and recommendations for the field and help organizations and stakeholders (1) understand the importance, scope, and effect of the issues facing children of justice-involved parents; (2) learn how to talk about these issues with their constituencies; and (3) appreciate how changes in practice can make meaningful differences by strengthening the relationship between children and their parents and reducing the trauma children experience when their parents are arrested, detained, and sentenced.""

    Webinar
  • Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting Aurora, Colorado, September 28-29, 2015

    Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting Aurora, Colorado, September 28-29, 2015 cover
    Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting Aurora, Colorado, September 28-29, 2015

    Sections of these proceedings are: "Introduction to the National Commission on Correctional Healthcare (NCCHC)" by Brent Gibson; "Identification of Programs of the Major Counties Sheriffs’ Association Members – Designed to Reduce Arrest and/or Incarceration of the Mentally Ill" by Andy Ferguson; "Planning and Implementing Effective Mental Health Services in Jails by David Stephens; "High Liability Inmates" by Henry Reyes; "Open Forum: Hot Topics"; "ACA Certified Corrections Professional (CCP) Program – Cost vs. Value for the Agency" by Kristen Furdyna; "The Case for Certification - American Jail Association" by Robert Kasabian; "National Sheriff’s Association Certifications" by Fred Wilson; association updates; "Legal Updates" by Carrie Hill; and future meeting topics.

    Document
  • The Changing Relationship Between Ex-Criminals and Their Parole Officers

    The Changing Relationship Between Ex-Criminals and Their Parole Officers cover
    The Changing Relationship Between Ex-Criminals and Their Parole Officers

    "Oftentimes, parole and probation officers are the only positive role models offenders have. About a decade ago, criminologists began asking if parole and probation visits were a missed opportunity for law enforcement. What if officers developed a more supportive relationship with offenders? What if they demonstrated to clients that they weren’t just checking boxes and delivering sanctions? The working theory was that given some personal attention, offenders might be more receptive to advice about resolving conflicts and avoiding crime. Amid a flurry of academic journal articles and pilot projects, researchers from the University of Cincinnati developed EPICS, short for Effective Practices in Community Supervision, a new model for structured face-to-face meetings between officers and their clients … Since 2006, more than 80 state and county criminal justice departments have adopted EPICS , including Multnomah County. By focusing on behavioral change, rather than just threats of being thrown back in jail, EPICS and similar efforts may help break the cycle of incarceration … The guiding principle behind EPICS is that offenders need help learning how to approach life in a more constructive way. If they’re offered drugs, they need to know how to weigh the long-term cost of incarceration against the short-term benefit of getting high. They need to practice overriding impulsive responses to situations. More broadly, they need to understand how their default thought patterns, without a conscious effort to change, will lead to further crime and punishment" (p. 36-37). This article discusses: what EPICS entails—the four steps of check-in, review, intervention, and homework; difference between EPICS and traditional community supervision; the "black box" of EPICS' effectiveness; potential success of EPICS in Multnomah County, Oregon; the need for program fidelity; the fact that EPICS adds structure to offender-officer interactions and facilitating criminal behavior change; while some officers like EPICS, others don't; some offenders don't like it either; the future.

    Web Page
  • Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting Aurora, Colorado, March 22 – 24, 2015

    Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting Aurora, Colorado, March 22 – 24, 2015 cover
    Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting Aurora, Colorado, March 22 – 24, 2015

    Sections of these proceedings are: "Program Session: Veterans—Courts, Housing, and Programs": "Part 1: Veterans: Considerations for Inmates and Staff" by Dane Collins, and "Part 2. The VA's Veterans Justice Programs and the Veterans Reentry Search Service" by Joel Rosenthal; "Program Session: Restrictive Housing: Step-Down Measures": "Part 1. Douglas County Special Management Unit—Segregation" by Mark Foxall, and "Part 2. Restrictive Housing" by Dane Collins; "Program Session: Re-Entry Programs and Partnerships with the Community": "Part 1. Opportunities in Jail Reentry" by A.T. Wall, "Part 2. Denver's TJC Experience: Transition from Jail to the Community" by Lisa Calderon, "Part 3. Southeast Regional Re-Entry and Rehabilitation Program" by Marlin Gusman; "Program Session: Data—What to Capture and How to Use It": "Part 1. Data: What We Should Capture and How We Should Use It" by Melissa Kovacs, and "Part 2. Data Collection for Performance Outcomes" by Marilyn Chandler Ford; "Program Session: Building the Jail's Workforce": "Part 1: Recruit, Hire, Train, and Retain a Diverse Workforce" by Charles Hank, and "Part 2. Orange County Corrections University & Recruitment" by Comita A. Riley; "Open Forum"; professional association updates; and future meeting topics.

    Document
  • Safeguarding the Rights of Girls in the Criminal Justice System: Preventing Violence, Stigmatization and Deprivation of Liberty

    Safeguarding the Rights of Girls in the Criminal Justice System: Preventing Violence, Stigmatization and Deprivation of Liberty cover
    Safeguarding the Rights of Girls in the Criminal Justice System: Preventing Violence, Stigmatization and Deprivation of Liberty

    This report is an excellent resource explaining how the "criminal justice system should aim to prevent incidents of violence, bring perpetrators to justice, and ensure recovery and social reintegration for victims. Like any other group in society, women and girls are entitled to nothing less … however, the social, economic and cultural position of girls, together with deeply rooted discriminatory attitudes toward them in society as a whole, influence the attitudes and responses of the criminal justice system to heinous crimes of violence committed against them. Rather than benefitting from rehabilitation, protection and redress, girls who fall victim to violence often find themselves criminalized, which can lead, in turn, to further violence against them, inhuman punishment and unlawful deprivation of liberty. At the same time, perpetrators of violence against girls are rarely held accountable for their actions or deterred from committing further criminal acts" (p. 1). Sections comprising this document are: introduction—scope and purpose, an overview of violence against girls, the experience of girls in the criminal justice system, and factors contributing to the vulnerability of girls in the criminal justice system; gender-role stereotypes as a barrier to girls' access to justice; ensuring robust legislation to prevent and to respond to violence against girls; implementing comprehensive prevention programs; strengthening the capacity of the criminal justice system to prevent violence, stigmatization, and deprivation of liberty amongst girls; strengthening accountability and ending impunity; and conclusions and recommendations.

    Document
  • Criminal Justice Decision Making Laboratory Job Aids

    Decision Making Laboratory Job Aids cover
    Criminal Justice Decision Making Laboratory Job Aids

    Access is provided to a great selection of case planning resources for corrections, probation, and parole staff. These job aids "are organized into specific areas: Case planning and case management--Descriptions of creating a behaviour or offense chain; An example decision grid to examine costs and benefits of crime versus prosocial behaviour. Risk assessment--An overview and summary of static and dynamic risk factors in order to understand risk assessment for different offender outcomes. Offender change – interactive journals/offender workbooks--Topics include motivation to change, anger management, criminal attitudes and associates, peers and relationships, and substance abuse; Created to provide intervention for low risk cases; Validation studies are ongoing regarding user satisfaction and impact on client outcomes."

    Web Page
  • Time Difference of Arrival System for Cell Phone Localization in Correctional Facilities|Final Report

    Cell Phone Localization in Correctional Facilities|Final Report cover
    Time Difference of Arrival System for Cell Phone Localization in Correctional Facilities|Final Report

    "Cell phones, smuggled in by guards or family members and activated with hard-to-trace prepaid calling plans, are a lifeline for criminals and gang members to order hits, buy drugs and plan escape attempts from behind bars. Correction officials have identified the problem of cell phones in prisons as one of the toughest issues they face. The purpose of this project is to design, implement and test an effective system for the detection and localization of cellular phones in correctional facilities. The key purpose of the proposed effort is to mature the prototype Time Difference Of Arrival (TDOA) and signal strength detection for location system from laboratory to deployment in a correctional facility, and capable of detecting and locating cell phones in real time. Another key purpose is to explicitly use the known building floor plan in the algorithm that processes the received cell phone signals in to the likely location" (p. 10). Sections contained in this report are: introduction and background; hardware receiver system development; cell phone signal transmitter; signal processing and algorithm development; experiments and results; Tartarus—the resultant system of hardware and software; products; participants and other collaborating organizations; impact; changes and problems; budgetary information—system cost ranging from $10,000 to $25,000 depending on facility size; and conclusions and future work. The researchers "have developed a novel technique for locating cellphone use in an indoor environment. A hardware instrument and software package that implements the technique has been developed. A data base containing representative cell phone signals for indoor environments has been established" (p. 68).

    Document
  • Separation by Bars and Miles: Visitation in State Prisons

    Separation by Bars and Miles: Visitation in State Prisons cover
    Separation by Bars and Miles: Visitation in State Prisons

    "Almost by definition, incarceration separates individuals from their families, but for decades this country has also placed unnecessary burdens on the family members left behind. Certainly in practice and perhaps by design, prisons are lonely places. Analyzing little-used government data, we find that visits are the exception rather than the rule. Less than a third of people in state prisons receive a visit from a loved one in a typical month … Despite the breadth of research showing that visits and maintaining family ties are among the best ways to reduce recidivism, the reality of having a loved one behind bars is that visits are unnecessarily grueling and frustrating" (p. 1). This report is an excellent introduction to the challenges families face visiting their loved ones in prison and ways state policymakers can reduce these hardships. Five recommendations cover: prison time as a last resort; adoption of visitation policies that promote family visitation; reduction of prison and jail telephone costs; suggestions from inmates and their families on how to make visitation easier; and alternatives to prison expansion.

    Web Page
  • Trends in Juvenile Justice State Legislation 2011-2015

    › Trends in Juvenile Justice State Legislation 2011-2015 cover
    Trends in Juvenile Justice State Legislation 2011-2015

    "Today, juvenile justice reform has become a largely bipartisan issue as lawmakers work together to develop new policies to align sound fiscal responsibility, community safety and better outcomes for youth. New legislative reforms reflect an interest in developmentally appropriate approaches to more evidence-based methods and cost-effective alternatives to incar­ceration. There also now exists an abundance of research that is available to lawmakers and the field on adolescent development—that includes the latest neuro[logical], social and behavioral science that distinguishes juveniles from adult offenders. Recent trends in juvenile justice legislation across the country represent a significant new direction to broadly reform justice systems." "Juvenile justice policies require balancing the interests of public safety, accountability and rehabilitation. The challenge for state lawmakers is to develop policies that seek to disrupt the pathways that youth follow into the justice system. In the past five years, juvenile justice reform legislation in the United States has grown at a remarkable pace. The reforms reflect an interest in developmentally appropriate approaches to more evidence-based and cost-effective alternatives to incarceration" (p. 1). Sections following an executive summary include: federal standards; comprehensive omnibus reforms; human trafficking; returning jurisdiction to the juvenile justice system—reforming transfer, waiver and direct file laws, and raising the age of juvenile court jurisdiction; prevention, intervention, and detention reform—intervention and realignment, status offenders, and detention reform; due process and defense reform—juvenile competency, indigent defense and other procedural issues, shackling, and solitary confinement; treating mental health needs of juvenile offenders; racial and ethnic disparities; restorative justice; reentry/aftercare—confidentiality of juvenile records and expungement; and conclusion.

    Document
  • 2015 OVC Report to the Nation, Fiscal Years 2013-2014: Building Capacity Through Research, Innovation, Technology, and Training

    2015 OVC Report to the Nation, Fiscal Years 2013-2014: Building Capacity Through Research, Innovation, Technology, and Training Cover
    2015 OVC Report to the Nation, Fiscal Years 2013-2014: Building Capacity Through Research, Innovation, Technology, and Training

    "OVC's Report to the Nation summarizes the progress made in upholding crime victims' rights and providing high-quality services to victims, survivors, and communities during fiscal years 2013-2014. The report highlights innovative programs and victim-centered initiatives, summarizes financial support to states and U.S. territories, and provides insight into OVC's strategic efforts to address both emerging and enduring challenges in order to expand and enhance victim assistance throughout the Nation." Sections comprising this report include: introduction; message from the OVC Director; the Crime Victims Fund; Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) compensation and assistance statistics; VOCA compensation highlights; VOCA assistance highlights; data and research; innovative practices; direct services; capacity building; reaching all victims; and public awareness.

    Web Page
  • Crime, Violence & Victimization Research Division's Compendium of Research on Violence Against Women, 1993-2014

    Crime, Violence & Victimization Research Division's Compendium of Research on Violence Against Women, 1993-2014 Cover
    Crime, Violence & Victimization Research Division's Compendium of Research on Violence Against Women, 1993-2014

    "For over forty years, NIJ has invested in research on violence against women. This research touches on a wide variety of public safety concerns, including intimate partner violence, teen dating violence, sexual assault, and human trafficking, as well as criminal justice challenges, including the availability of legal and victim support services, the effectiveness of prevention programs, and the impact of such crimes over time. To give researchers and support providers easier centralized access to recent evidence-based findings, NIJ annually updates a compendium that includes an abstract of each grant research study with details on how to find further publications." Entries present report number, amount spent, principal investigator, NIJ Program Officer, status of project, and any product produced. Projects are organized into the following areas: Justice and Related Systems—Advocacy, Arrest and Prosecution, Offender Interventions, Courts & the Criminal Justice System, Courts & the Civil Justice System, Forensic and Investigative Methods, Protection Orders, Policy and Legislation, and Victim Services; Definition and Measurement—Development of Risk Assessment Instruments, and Context, Meaning, and Motive; Epidemiology—National Surveys, Databases, Secondary Data Analysis of National Surveys Examining Risk Factors for Violence Against Women, and Risk Factors for Homicide and Serious Injury; Social and Cultural Context—Specific Populations, VAW and Welfare, Domestic Violence and Children, Commercial Sexual Exploitation of Children, Drug and Alcohol Use, and Criminal Histories, and Context and Life Course; Trafficking in Persons; VAWA (Violence Against Women Act) Evaluations; Synthesis of Existing Information; NIJ Jointly Funded Projects; Teen Dating Violence; and Violence against Indian Women.

    Document

Pages