Back to top

National Institute of Corrections. Information Center (NICIC) (Aurora CO)

The Kansas Offender Risk Reduction & Reentry Plan (KOR3P) is described. Sections comprising this article are: the basics; the key of skill development; moving risk reduction into community corrections; and collaboration for progress.

Providing Tools Cover

"Reentry refers to the transition of offenders from prisons or jails back into the community. According to the U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs more than 650,000 people are released from state and federal prisons annually. Another 9 million cycle through local jails. Research by the Bureau of Justice Statistics published in 2006, has shown that more than two-thirds of state prisoners will be rearrested within three years of their release and more than half (56.7%) are re-incarcerated. The number of offenders and the likelihood of their re-incarceration have made reentry a priority for policy makers and criminal justice researchers and practitioners. Breaking the cycle of reoffending and re-incarceration has many important implications for public safety and policy. High rates of recidivism mean more crime, more victims, and more pressure on an already overburdened criminal justice system. The costs of imprisonment also wreak havoc on state and municipal budgets. In the past 20 years state spending on corrections has grown at a faster rate than nearly any other state budget item. The U.S. now spends more than $85 billion on federal, state, and local corrections. Because reentry intersects with issues of health and housing, education and employment, family, faith, and community well-being, many federal agencies are focusing on the reentry population with initiatives that aim to improve outcomes in each of these areas" (p. 3). This annotated bibliography addresses issues surrounding the reentry of offenders into the community. Entries are organized according to: reentry websites; reentry in general; reentry by category for jails, prisons, victims of crimes, community and family support, education, employment and housing, health and safety, and special populations; and resources with earlier publication dates.

Reentry Annotated Bibliography cover

Resources about the use of restricted housing are provided and organized according to: resources from NIC; prevalence of restrictive housing; governing practices and policies; the basis for and process involved in determining whether, and for how long, someone is placed in special housing; conditions of confinement—juveniles, and female offenders; research—effects of prolonged confinement; legislation and litigation impacts; programming and reentry-focused services; availability of medical and mental health services; safe alternatives and step-down programs; Resources about the use of restrictive housing are provided and organized according to: resources from NIC; prevalence of restrictive housing; governing practices and policies; the basis for and process involved in determining whether, and for how long, someone is placed in special housing; conditions of confinement—juveniles, and female offenders; research—effects of prolonged confinement; litigation; programming and reentry-focused services; availability of medical and mental health services; safe alternatives and step-down programs.

Restrictive Housing Cover

Demographics, turnover, and leadership development for four levels of correctional management (e.g., executive leaders, senior leaders, managers, and supervisors) are analyzed. Sections comprising this report are: project background; key findings; the survey sample; overview -- analysis of data for all responses; analysis of data on executive level positions; analysis of data on senior leader positions; analysis of data on management level positions; analysis of data on supervisory positions; analysis of data on jails; analysis of data on prisons; analysis of data on community corrections; and correctional leadership demographics.

Results of Data Analysis

The use of evidence-based practices to improve discretionary parole system is explained. This article is comprised of these sections: releasing the right offender at the right time; shifting to a case management model for reentry; designing a new technical parole violator (TPV) management program; development of statewide and local performance measures; and building a case for additional budget resources.

Rising to the Challenge Cover

Issue contents are: “Foreword” by Kermit Humphries; “An Overview of NIC’s Transition from Prison to the Community Initiative” by Peggy B. Burke; “Rising to the Challenge of Applying Evidence-Based Practices Across the Spectrum of a State Parole Board” by Sherry Tate and Catherine C. McVey; “Collaboration and Partnership in the Community: Advancing the Michigan Prisoner ReEntry Initiative” by Le’Ann Duran; “Providing Tools for Risk Reduction Case Management in Parole and Community Corrections” by Keven Pellant and Margie Phelps; “Improving Parole Outcomes with Performance Leadership and Data: Doing What Works” by Danny Hunter, George Braucht, and John Prevost; “Working Together to Improve Reentry: Bridging Budgets and Programs, Public and Private, Prison and the Community” by Ginger Martin; “Ensuring Successful Offender Reentry: Umatilla/Morrow County “Reach-In” Services” by Mark Royal; “Creating Better Transitions at Indiana’s Plainfield Reentry Educational Facility” by Michael Lloyd; “Gender-Responsive Reentry in Rhode Island: A Long and Winding Road” by Bree Derrick; and “Missouri Makes Its Move Toward a New Reentry Philosophy” by Julie Boehm.

Promising Strategies Cover

Articles in this issue include:

  • “Foreword” by Ken Rose
  • “A Framework for Implementing Evidence-Based Practices in Pretrial Services” by John Clark
  • “Advancing Evidence-Based Practices in the Pretrial Field” by Katie Green, Pat Smith, and Kristina Bryant
  • “Improving Pretrial Assessment and Supervision in Colorado” by Michael R. Jones and Sue Ferrere
  • “Pretrial Defendants: Are They Getting Too Much of a Good Thing?” by Barbara M. Hankey
  • “Charge Specialty and Revictimization of Defendants Charged with Domestic Violence Offenses” by Spurgeon Kennedy
  • “Pretrial Rearrests Among Domestic Violence Defendants in New York City” by Richard R. Peterson
Topics in Community Corrections, Annual Issue 2008: Applying Evidence-Based Practices in Pretrial Services Cover

"This bibliography attempts to offer a compilation of information on trauma-informed care by reviewing general information about trauma as well as focusing on the criminal justice system and corrections (women, adults, and younger people), peer support, and screening/assessment for trauma. In addition, definitions of many of these tools are provided" (p. 3). Eighty-four resources are organized into the following areas: trauma-informed care in general; trauma-informed care in the criminal justice system and in corrections; trauma-informed care for youth in the criminal justice system; peer-to-peer trauma-informed care; trauma; gender neutral screenings and assessments; and trauma and/or gender informed screenings and assessments.

Trauma Annotated Bibliography Cover

Some of the improvements made to Oregon's offender reentry transition process are highlighted. Partnerships include: the Oregon Trail Card (debit card); identification and driver's license; transitional housing; family planning; pro-social supports; and the Governor's Re-Entry Council.

Working Together Cover

Now in its 14th edition, an updated online version of the Corrections Environment Scan is presented here. Renamed the Corrections Environmental Scan in 2017, it continues to evolve into a popular tool that corrections practitioners use to inform their work in jails, prisons, and community supervision.

The report is arranged into five topics: Population Demographics, Economy, Workforce, Technology, and Statistics, with the special highlighted topic: Justice Involved Women. The Corrections Environmental Scan is intended to give a broad overview of the latest news and trends in these topics, from the corrections, domestic, and global perspectives.

Pages

Subscribe to National Institute of Corrections. Information Center (NICIC)  (Aurora CO)