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National Institute of Corrections (NIC) (Washington, DC)

Highlights are provided of advice given by individuals from correctional agencies and faith-based and community organizations on how to create successful partnerships. Sections of this presentation are: understanding each other—questions and concerns; making partnerships work; legal issues; and getting started.

A Model for Social Justice: Collaboration Between Faith-Based and Community Organizations and Corrections: Highlights Cover

“This Quick Guide will help agencies and facilities develop a comprehensive response to working with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) inmates. It is not meant to provide an answer to every question or an in-depth discussion of all issues that agencies face or that the LGBTI population faces while in custody. It provides an overview of the important issues that agencies should consider when working to house and treat LGBTI inmates in a way that is safe and consistent with an agency’s mission, values, and security guidelines … This Quick Guide is organized chronologically according to the decisions an agency will have to make before and at the point when an LGBTI individual enters the system. These areas of focus include: Assessment of Agency Culture (as relates to LGBTI individuals); Assessment of Agency Staff and Administration Knowledge and Attitudes; Examination of Current Relevant Agency Norms; Development and Implementation Mechanisms; Development of Awareness of Current Legal Responsibilities; Foundational Issues; Intake Screening/Risk Assessment; Classification and Housing Placement; Medical and Mental Health Care; Information Management; Group Inmate Management; Specific Safety and Privacy Concerns for Transgender and Intersex Inmates; and Staff, Volunteer, and Contractor Training Requirements” (p. 1).

A Quick Guide for LGBTI Policy Development for Adult Prisons and Jails Cover

“This Quick Guide will help agencies and facilities develop a comprehensive response to working with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) youth. It is not meant to provide an answer to every question or an in-depth discussion of all issues that agencies face or that the LGBTI population faces while in custody. It provides an overview of the important issues that agencies should consider when working to house and treat LGBTI youth in a way that is safe and consistent with an agency’s mission, values, and security guidelines … This Quick Guide is organized chronologically according to the decisions an agency will have to make before and at the point when an LGBTI youth enters the system. These areas of focus include: Assessment of Agency Culture (as relates to LGBTI individuals); Assessment of Agency Staff and Administration Knowledge and Attitudes; Examination of Current Relevant Agency Norms; Development and Implementation Mechanisms; Development of Awareness of Current Legal Responsibilities; Foundational Issues; Intake Screening/Risk Assessment; Classification and Housing Placement; Medical and Mental Health Care; Information Management; Group Youth Management; Specific Safety and Privacy Concerns for Transgender and Intersex Youth; and Staff, Volunteer, and Contractor Training Requirements” (p. 1).

A Quick Guide for LGBTI Policy Development for Youth Confinement Facilities Cover

Reviews information on gender-specific policies, programs, and services in corrections. Topics covered by this bulletin include: the Gender-Responsive Strategies Project -- approach and findings; defining gender responsiveness; national profile of women offenders; the foundation for the principles a new vision -- six guiding principles for a gender-responsive criminal justice system; general strategies for implementing guiding principles; gender-responsive policy elements; and conclusion -- addressing the realities of women's lives is the key to improved outcomes.

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This program addresses the Americans with Disabilities Act. The ADA legislatively impacted the field of corrections when it was signed into law in 1990. Some correctional organizations have made significant progress to address this legislation, others have found themselves in costly litigation, and for others, ADA compliance needs to be addressed. Compliance is everyone's business. Panelists will provide a systemic view of the following: ADA awareness and ADA myths; fifteen-year history of the ADA in corrections; collaboration among administrators, health care, and custody staff; relationship between security and the ADA concept of "direct threat"; reasonable accommodations within a correctional setting; dialogue between stakeholders regarding ADA compliance in corrections; benefits of accessible design; and the future of ADA in corrections.

A Systemic Approach to the Americans with Disabilities Act in Corrections: Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow Cover

Crime is everyone's business. It affects entire communities. Too often, crime victims are left to fend for themselves or are forgotten, especially after the court process. Significant progress has been made in corrections-based victim services over the past two decades. Yet, true excellence in victim services can only be achieved through active collaboration.

This interactive, multidisciplinary program examines the need for a collaborative approach to corrections-based victim services. In addition, it highlights the importance of victim-centered responses by corrections, allied professionals, and the community in addressing the rights, needs, and traumas of crime victims.

Participants will: gain increased sensitivity towards crime victims and describe how crime affects people; identify and apply various methods and strategies to hold offenders accountable for the harm they have caused; identify and plan responsive strategies for corrections-based victim services in partnership with other justice and community stakeholders; develop a plan to measure victim services effectively in your jurisdiction; identify local and national resources and develop action plans for victim services collaboration; and create connections to help provide seamless services throughout corrections.

The intended outcome of this training is to empower agencies to take a leadership role in the development and delivery of victim services training to meet their specific system requirements. This training will be supplemented with resource materials that states, jurisdictions, and agencies may use in the development and management of victim services training.

Facilitator and participant manuals are also included.

Achieving Excellence in Correctional Victim Services Through Collaboration  Cover

“Sexual abuse in custody can and often does have lifelong effects on youth. Youth who are sexually abused or experience sexual violence can suffer higher rates of drug use, have disproportionate contact with the criminal justice system into adulthood, become victimizers, and/or have higher rates of mental illness than youth who do not suffer sexual abuse.1 In addition, sexual abuse by staff or other youth in custody compromises safety and security as well as the overall mission of juvenile justice systems—to protect and rehabilitate youth … This handbook aims to educate juvenile justice professionals about the following: Why juvenile justice professionals should be concerned about sexual abuse of youth in custody; How culture and environment contribute to sexual abuse of youth in custody; Tools that will help identify, address, and respond to sexual abuse of youth in custody; How to investigate allegations of sexual abuse of youth in custody; Useful legal tools for prosecuting sexual abuse of youth in custody; [and] Preventive measures for juvenile justice agencies” (p. 1). Sections of this handbook include: introduction; the landscape of juvenile justice agencies; sexual abuse of youth in custody; youth in custody—the role of adolescent development in preventing sexual abuse; culture of youth facilities; identifying inappropriate staff-on-youth and youth-on-youth relationships; medical and mental health care for victims; investigating sexual abuse of youth in custody—duties of a first responder; rights of staff when an allegation of staff sexual misconduct is made; legal liability and sanctions for sexual abuse of youth in custody; preventive strategies; and conclusion.

Addressing Sexual Violence Against Youth in Custody: Youth Workers’ Handbook on Identifying and Addressing Sexual Violence in Juvenile Justice Settings Cover

Complex issues surrounding staff sexual misconduct are addressed during this 36-hour training program. Modules comprising this curriculum are: defining staff sexual misconduct with offenders; state laws; staff sexual misconduct -- the nature of one's role and power; policy; action planning; agency culture; management and operational practices; training; investigating allegations of staff sexual misconduct with offenders; human resources; legal considerations; developing a community and media response; and prevention. Also provided is a training agenda and tips for teaching.

Addressing Staff Sexual Misconduct with Offenders Curriculum: Instructor's Guide Cover

A description of the Offender Workforce Development Specialist (OWDS) Partnership Training Program is provided. 'This administrative guide provides an overview of the training program, including its benefits and requirements'and information needed to make an informed decision for participating in the training program, including the criteria for selecting a qualified, multidisciplinary team of trainees' (p. 1). The following sections comprise this guide: overview of the training program; introduction; eligibility requirements; training process; and announcements. Appendixes provide participant information, Center for Credentialing and Education certification requirements, program evaluation, and copyright restrictions for OWDS training materials.

Administrative Guide Cover

“This white paper presents a shared framework for reducing recidivism and behavioral health problems among individuals under correctional control or supervision—that is, for individuals in correctional facilities or who are on probation or parole. The paper is written for policymakers, administrators, and practitioners committed to making the most effective use of scarce resources to improve outcomes for individuals with behavioral health problems who are involved in the corrections system. It is meant to provide a common structure for corrections and treatment system professionals to begin building truly collaborative responses to their overlapping service population. These responses include both behind-the-bars and community-based interventions. This framework is designed to achieve each system’s goals and ultimately to help millions of individuals rebuild their lives while on probation or after leaving prison or jail” (p. viii). Three parts follow an introduction regarding the need for a framework intended for coordinating services across systems: current responses to individuals with mental health and substance use disorders and corrections involvement—mental health treatment, substance abuse treatment, mental health and substance use appearing together, corrections—custody, control, and supervision, screening and assessment, the relationship between behavioral health needs and criminogenic risk/need—assembling the parts, and closing thoughts on RNR (risk-need-responsivity); the framework—strong foundations, criminogenic risk and behavior health needs, application to resource allocation and individual case responses, and goal for the framework’s use; and operationalizing the framework and next steps.

Adults with Behavioral Health Needs Under Correctional Supervision: A Shared Framework for Reducing Recidivism and Promoting Recovery Cover

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