Back to top

National Institute of Corrections (NIC) (Washington, DC)

Webinar held May 2, 2018

Blythe Balistrieri discusses the ways in which the general correctional library and law libraries can partner, the challenges correctional librarians must negotiate daily, and how to streamline correctional library operations. Her presentation covers some of the history of correctional libraries, challenges that these libraries can face, and how librarians can work to alleviate some of them. Professor Balestrieri listed five actions that correctional library staff can take to combat some of their challenges: Advocacy, Communication, Education, Training and Team Building. Makes reference to court cases Bounds v. Smith, Thornburgh v. Abbot, Lewis v. Casey.

Working Effectively with the Law Library [Webinar]

This Guide provides a comprehensive overview of available information on victims' rights and services. It is informed by the foundational work of many advocates, academics and community corrections professionals. While the Guide will outline specific tools and resources to inform your work, it is worth noting that there is no one size fits all approach that will work across all scenarios. There may be information in the Guide that will require you to self-reflect on your practice as it relates to the needs of victims, however, you are the best judge on how and when to use this resource.

The Guide is intended to: Develop your knowledge and expertise in working with victims, advocates and related service providers within the boundaries of your role as a Probation and Parole Officer (PPO); Inform professional development and staff training; Build capacity of PPO supervisors to coach and guide decision making related to victims' rights and needs; and Support presentations to other criminal justice system professionals about the intersection of PPO roles and victims' rights and needs.

Sections comprising this guide are: Introduction; Community Corrections and Crime Victims; Victims' Rights; Working with Victims of Crime; Building Partnerships; and Tools and Materials. A Glossary is also provided.

Working with Victims of Crime Cover

"It has been estimated that nearly 250,000 youth under age 18 end up in the adult criminal justice system every year. However, little attention has been directed to how adult corrections systems are managing the youth offenders that end up in jails, prisons and under community supervision. To address this information gap, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) convened three dozen juvenile justice and adult corrections experts on June 18th, 2010, to consider some of the known issues, impacts and opportunities that face corrections systems as they work to safely and effectively rehabilitate thousands of youth offenders in the nations' jails, prisons, probation and parole systems. This monograph presents the key findings identified during this convening of experts." Six sections comprise this publication: executive summary; what is known about the issue of juveniles in the adult corrections systems, and where there are gaps in data collection and information; what the issues, impacts and options are facing public safety systems when youth are awaiting trial on adult charges; when youth are convicted, and committed to the adult system; when youth who convicted in adult court are on probation or parole; and conclusion--corrections and the entire public safety system needs to focus on the successful strategies to curb delinquency, and positive youth development. The "Summary of Options for Federal, State, and Local Policymakers to Consider" is appended.

You're An Adult Now Cover

If you or your agency wants or needs information about improving or creating and implementing a new reentry program, then attending this virtual conference is a must. “On June 12, 2013, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) will launch its first-ever virtual conference, “Cuff Key to Door Key: A Systems Approach to Reentry.” Topics covered during the conference will include mental health, sentencing, a review of successful reentry programs, Thinking for a Change (T4C), and a look at the challenges of reentry and transforming corrections culture. Edward Latessa, the interim dean and professor at the College of Education, Criminal Justice and Human Services at the University of Cincinnati, will deliver the keynote address” (p. 90). This article explains the reasoning behind the virtual conference, how to view it, and the complexities of successful reentry programming. This article is used with permission from the American Correctional Association. Any further reprinting, altering, copying, transmitting, or use in any way needs written permission from ACA.

conference image

With increased awareness of the effects of stress, adversity, and trauma on people’s lives, criminal justice professionals are considering what this means in their correctional settings. There is growing evidence of the effects of child neglect and abuse (as well as other forms of traumatic stress) on the health, mental health, and behavior of men and women residing in jails and prisons. While research and clinical experience indicate that there is a high incidence of trauma and co-occurring problems among these groups, corrections professionals struggle to provide them with effective management and services. It is particularly challenging when many institutions have staff who are affected by trauma in their personal and work lives. Organizational stress and trauma create additional challenges in the environment and culture of the workplace. Moving from trauma informed to trauma responsive to implement trauma-informed care can be challenging. The webinar speakers have extensive experience in delivering trauma informed education and services to the men and women in the custody of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation as well as other state and local agencies nationally. This webinar series guides administrators and correctional staff through the process and will provide updated information and research.

Webinar Objectives:
The primary goals of this three-part webinar series are to:

  •     Provide criminal justice, mental health, and substance use treatment professionals with up-to-date information regarding trauma-informed care within the criminal justice system.
  •     Provide information on the lifelong effects of trauma, recovery needs, and implementation of trauma-focused treatment interventions (including research findings).
  •     Provide an outline for the process of becoming a trauma-informed organization.

Each of the sessions includes discussion of content, polling and video clips, a question and answer period as well as a list of resources referenced during the presentations.  

Part 1: This session provides a series of definitions, a brief research overview, the implications of adverse childhood exposures (ACEs) and the potential for lifelong impact.  It further addresses the relationship between trauma and substance use disorders (SUD), the relationship between trauma and violence, and the complex needs of recovery.

Moderators/Speakers

  • Maureen Buell, Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections
  • Stephanie Covington, Ph.D., LCSW, Co-Director, Center for Gender and Justice
  • Nena Messina, Ph.D., Research Criminologist at UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs and President of Envisioning Justice Solutions, Inc.
image for webinar
The Association between ACEs and Criminal Justice Involvement [Webinar]

This is a three part webinar series. Each webinar builds into the next!

Are you converting your instructor led training (a.k.a. face-to-face or in-person training) to live virtual instructor led training (VILT)? Do you know where to start to convert face-to-face training and materials, such as your facilitator guides, participant guides, slide shows, and other learning experience materials?

What We Will Do in the Webinar Series?

  1. Explore popular virtual platforms, compare and contrast them to your unique agency needs / outcomes for virtual learning.
  2. Assess agency technology infrastructure as well as learner, trainer, and agency readiness for virtual learning.
  3. Survey best practices to determine the duration of virtual learning based upon training outcomes.
  4. Apply options for participant engagement, interaction, and collaboration during virtual learning.
  5. Share experiences from other correctional agencies with respect to in-person to virtual conversions.

Part 1:
In this webinar, participants used the ADDIE framework (Assessment, Design, Development, Implementation and Evaluation) as a virtual roadmap to:

  • Compare and contrast the characteristics of popular virtual training platforms;
  • Assess agency technology infrastructure versus what is needed for effective live virtual training delivery;
  • Assess learner, trainer, and agency readiness for virtual learning; and
  • Determine initial steps for conversion of training from in person (instructor led training / ILT) to virtual instructor led (VILT).

 

Facilitators

  • Jeff Hadnot, Chief, NIC Academy Division
  • Ashley Kerr, Training Officer, Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction
  • Elizabeth Kreger, Assistant Director of Adult Options, Ohio Department of Education
  • Leslie LeMaster, Correctional Program Specialist, NIC Academy Division
  • Jim Wiseman, Director of Training (retired), Missouri Department of Corrections
Where Do I Start? Using ADDIE as a Roadmap for Conversion (1 of 3) [Webinar]

With increased awareness of the effects of stress, adversity, and trauma on people’s lives, criminal justice professionals are considering what this means in their correctional settings. There is growing evidence of the effects of child neglect and abuse (as well as other forms of traumatic stress) on the health, mental health, and behavior of men and women residing in jails and prisons. While research and clinical experience indicate that there is a high incidence of trauma and co-occurring problems among these groups, corrections professionals struggle to provide them with effective management and services. It is particularly challenging when many institutions have staff who are affected by trauma in their personal and work lives. Organizational stress and trauma create additional challenges in the environment and culture of the workplace. Moving from trauma informed to trauma responsive to implement trauma-informed care can be challenging. The webinar speakers have extensive experience in delivering trauma informed education and services to the men and women in the custody of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation as well as other state and local agencies nationally. This webinar series guides administrators and correctional staff through the process and will provide updated information and research.

Webinar Objectives:
The primary goals of this three-part webinar series are to:

  •     Provide criminal justice, mental health, and substance use treatment professionals with up-to-date information regarding trauma-informed care within the criminal justice system.
  •     Provide information on the lifelong effects of trauma, recovery needs, and implementation of trauma-focused treatment interventions (including research findings).
  •     Provide an outline for the process of becoming a trauma-informed organization.

Each of the sessions includes discussion of content, polling and video clips, a question and answer period, as well as a list of resources referenced during the presentations.  

Part 2: This session discusses the rationale for trauma-informed treatment, the values and efficacy of trauma informed services, and related research findings.

Moderators/Speakers

  • Maureen Buell, Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections
  • Stephanie Covington, Ph.D., LCSW, Co-Director, Center for Gender and Justice
  • Nena Messina, Ph.D., Research Criminologist at UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs and President of Envisioning Justice Solutions, Inc.
image for webinar
Trauma-Informed Treatment and Theory, Part 2 [Webinar]

This is a three part webinar series. Each webinar builds into the next!

Are you converting your instructor led training (a.k.a. face-to-face or in-person training) to live virtual instructor led training (VILT)? Do you know where to start to convert face-to-face training and materials, such as your facilitator guides, participant guides, slide shows, and other learning experience materials?

What We Will Do in the Webinar Series?

  1. Explore popular virtual platforms, compare and contrast them to your unique agency needs / outcomes for virtual learning.
  2. Assess agency technology infrastructure as well as learner, trainer, and agency readiness for virtual learning.
  3. Survey best practices to determine the duration of virtual learning based upon training outcomes.
  4. Apply options for participant engagement, interaction, and collaboration during virtual learning.
  5. Share experiences from other correctional agencies with respect to in-person to virtual conversions.

If you are interested in the answers to these questions and more, then watch this webinar series!

Part 2:

In the second webinar of this series, participants use the ADDIE road map to guide steps needed to analyze, design, develop, implement and evaluate the instructor led training (ILT) to virtual instructor led training (VILT) conversion process. Best practices for converting from ILT to VILT are detailed including analyzing status of curriculum you are converting to virtual, is it a one to one hour ratio from in person to live virtual delivery hours, virtual digital live and off-live activities, and determining session duration and number of live virtual sessions. The webinar includes three agency conversion stories, focused on the steps to converting from in person to virtual training.

Experiences are shared from
1) Ohio Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation's (ODRC) New Employee Orientation (NEO) training,
2) NIC's Correctional Leadership Development (CLD) training, and
3) NIC's Thinking for a Change (T4C) Facilitator training.

Facilitators

  • Jeff Hadnot, Chief, NIC Academy Division
  • Ashley Kerr, Training Officer, Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction
  • Elizabeth Kreger, Assistant Director of Adult Options, Ohio Department of Education
  • Leslie LeMaster, Correctional Program Specialist, NIC Academy Division
  • Jim Wiseman, Director of Training (retired), Missouri Department of Corrections
What’s Next? How Do I Convert ILT to VILT? The Basics - Part Two [Webinar]

With increased awareness of the effects of stress, adversity, and trauma on people’s lives, criminal justice professionals are considering what this means in their correctional settings. There is growing evidence of the effects of child neglect and abuse (as well as other forms of traumatic stress) on the health, mental health, and behavior of men and women residing in jails and prisons. While research and clinical experience indicate that there is a high incidence of trauma and co-occurring problems among these groups, corrections professionals struggle to provide them with effective management and services. It is particularly challenging when many institutions have staff who are affected by trauma in their personal and work lives. Organizational stress and trauma create additional challenges in the environment and culture of the workplace. Moving from trauma informed to trauma responsive to implement trauma-informed care can be challenging. The webinar speakers have extensive experience in delivering trauma informed education and services to the men and women in the custody of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation as well as other state and local agencies nationally. This webinar series guides administrators and correctional staff through the process and will provide updated information and research.

Webinar Objectives:
The primary goals of this three-part webinar series are to:

  •     Provide criminal justice, mental health, and substance use treatment professionals with up-to-date information regarding trauma-informed care within the criminal justice system.
  •     Provide information on the lifelong effects of trauma, recovery needs, and implementation of trauma-focused treatment interventions (including research findings).
  •     Provide an outline for the process of becoming a trauma-informed organization.

Part 3: Becoming Trauma Informed and Moving to Trauma Responsive 
This session discusses trauma triggers, examples of calming and grounding strategies that can be employed within correctional settings, a brief exploration of the presence of and effects of vicarious trauma with correctional staff, and suggestions regarding self-care.

Moderators/Speakers

  •     Maureen Buell, Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections
  •     Stephanie Covington, Ph.D., LCSW, Co-Director, Center for Gender and Justice
  •     Nena Messina, Ph.D., Research Criminologist at UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs and President of Envisioning Justice Solutions, Inc.

 

Becoming Trauma Informed and Moving to Trauma Responsive, Part 3 [Webinar]

This is a three part webinar series. Each webinar builds into the next!

Are you converting your instructor led training (a.k.a. face-to-face or in-person training) to live virtual instructor led training (VILT)? Do you know where to start to convert face-to-face training and materials, such as your facilitator guides, participant guides, slide shows, and other learning experience materials?

What We Will Do in the Webinar Series?

  1. Explore popular virtual platforms, compare and contrast them to your unique agency needs / outcomes for virtual learning.
  2. Assess agency technology infrastructure as well as learner, trainer, and agency readiness for virtual learning.
  3. Survey best practices to determine the duration of virtual learning based upon training outcomes.
  4. Apply options for participant engagement, interaction, and collaboration during virtual learning.
  5. Share experiences from other correctional agencies with respect to in-person to virtual conversions.

If you are interested in the answers to these questions and more, then watch this webinar series!

Part 3:

In the third webinar of this series, participants use the ADDIE road map to guide steps needed to design in and add engagements, interactions, and collaboration tools into their virtual instructor led training (VILT) conversion process. The webinar includes defining engagements and interactions that lead to virtual collaboration, and highlights various examples of how to design and add these tools to virtual training design and facilitation. Included in the webinar is demonstration and practice of using a design flow tool for detailing engagements, interactions, and collaborations to meet a performance objective. Sample design flow is shared for a virtual performance objective from NIC's Correctional Leadership Development (CLD) virtual training series.

Facilitators

  • Jeff Hadnot, Chief, NIC Academy Division
  • Ashley Kerr, Training Officer, Ohio Department of Rehabilitation and Correction
  • Elizabeth Kreger, Assistant Director of Adult Options, Ohio Department of Education
  • Leslie LeMaster, Correctional Program Specialist, NIC Academy Division
  • Jim Wiseman, Director of Training (retired), Missouri Department of Corrections
How Do I Design / Add Engagement, Interaction and Collaboration Tools? (3 of 3) [Webinar]

Pages

Subscribe to National Institute of Corrections (NIC) (Washington, DC)