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National Institute of Corrections (NIC) (Washington, DC)

This 3-hour NIC broadcast discusses strategies to recruit promising candidates for corrections jobs and how to retain experienced staff. Topics include: emphasizing corrections as a career rather than "just a job"; informing the public about the variety of careers available in corrections; how broad participation by agency staff helps foster successful recruitment and retention; how employers can support the connections between career, family, and community; and tools agencies are using for successful recruitment and retention.

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The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) Community Corrections Collaborative Network (CCCN)—a network representing community corrections professionals—commissioned a position paper to explore the successes and challenges facing the community corrections field. The position paper, "Community Corrections Collaborative Network: Safe and Smart Ways To Solve America’s Correctional Challenges", finds that community corrections is a critical part of the public safety system that supervises individuals under the legal authority in the community to reduce crime and victimization" (p. i). Seven chapters comprise this publication: the five core domains of community corrections—probation, parole, pretrial services, diversion programs, and community treatment; reducing reoffending, recidivism, and victimization in your community—targeting risk, need, and responsivity of the people we supervise; community corrections—changing lives, reducing harm, and helping to build your community; community corrections--a more central role in how the corrections system will manage its resources and overall approach; community corrections has strong public support; helping to solve the nation's public safety and correctional challenges; and what community corrections needs from the field and its partners to meet the public safety and corrections challenges. "Community corrections is changing lives, reducing harm, and helping build communities, and it has strong public support. To succeed in the future, community corrections and its partners need to refocus resources on approaches that are proven to work; change laws, policies, and practices that do not work; target treatment and supervision only to those who need it; and reallocate resources appropriately. Also to succeed in the future, community corrections and its partners need to expand the capacity of the field to take on new challenges and designate resources appropriately" (p. i).

Community Corrections Collaborative Network: Safe and Smart Ways to Solve America's Correctional Challenges Cover

This bibliography describes 71 items that address workforce development problems faced by community corrections, probation, and parole agencies. Some of the topics discussed are: the changing workforce; the changing roles of staff; caseload management demands; and recruiting, hiring, training, developing, and retaining staff.

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This program will help professionals identify the strengths and resources inherent in the family as a fundamental support system for individuals upon their release from prison or jail. It is designed to stimulate new ways of thinking about the family as a resource to enhance offender reentry and supervision and to increase public safety.

Family, broadly defined, includes individuals' blood relatives and friends who play a significant role in a person's life. Family members are essential resources who may ease the transition from confinement to the community or positively enhance the community supervision process. Unfortunately, the family is too often viewed as presenting challenges rather than as a source of shared history and untapped resources.

The goal of this broadcast is to encourage participants to think about: enhancing the reentry and supervision processes through contextual thinking about the family; tapping the strengths of families and communities as means of good government to enhance public safety; utilizing family and community resources after government intervention has ended; and addressing the challenge of negotiating multiple services that may be used by the family to enhance positive outcomes.

Community Supervision: Using a Strength-Based, Family-Focused Approach Cover

The knowledge, skills, and traits needed by a detention facility inspector are assessed in this DACUM profile. Tasks are organized into the following duties; conduct facility inspections; provide technical assistance; perform administrative tasks; conduct investigations; oversee construction plan review process; provide training programs; and promote professional growth.

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Developed as a demonstration during the "DACUM Facilitator Training" session, April 15-16, 1997 in Longmont, CO., this profile contains in brief form the competencies expected of a training administrator.

Competency Profile of Training Administrator Cover

Duties with corresponding tasks are provided in this DACUM profile of a Warden/Superintendent. Characteristics associated with worker traits and attitudes, and general knowledge and skills are also listed

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Competency Profile of Warden/Superintendent Cover

A “framework that identifies the characteristics and competencies that paroling authorities must have to be effective in implementing evidence-based practices in the context of transition programs and services” is presented (p.8). These sections follow an executive summary: introduction; the impact of history on current reform efforts; the key elements of the parole process—the institutional, reentry, community, and discharge phases; the foundation of system effectiveness—evidence-based practice, organizational development, and collaboration; moving forward; and conclusion. An appendix lists intermediate and process measures for implementation.

Comprehensive Framework for Paroling Authorities in an Era of Evidence-Based Practice Cover

The development of both external and internal prison classification procedures are covered during this 36-hour program. Sections of this manual address: action planning; evaluation standards for classification; internal classification; high risk and special needs; women's classification issues; information systems; litigation issues; implementation strategies; assessment of external classification system; and supplementary reading.

Comprehensive Objective Cover

The impact of external and internal forces on “corrections policy innovation in which measures to control prison populations and enhance service delivery were implemented despite challenging institutional and social environments” is examined (p. 2). This is good reading for those agencies looking to implement their own strategies for correctional system reform. This report contains these sections: introduction; the context and dynamics of corrections reform—expanding capacity (1980 to early 1990s), addressing prison growth (early 1990-2005), and implementing broader correctional reforms (2006 to the present); context and design of the Kansas Offender Risk Reduction and Reentry Program (KOR3P) and Michigan Prisoner Reentry Initiative (MPRI); documenting organizational change—domains of change within the DOC and beyond and similarities and differences in design and implementation of the reforms; emerging challenges and constraints; and conclusion and recommendations.

Context and Impact of Organizational Changes in State Corrections Agencies: A Study of Local Discourses and Practices in Kansas and Michigan Cover

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