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  • greenprisons.org

    Greenprisons.org Cover
    greenprisons.org

    “Your Source for News and Information on Environmentally Responsible Products and Services in the Corrections Industry.” Points of access are: about greenprisons; facility; newslinks; conferences; webinars; green programs; and resources.

    Web Page
  • Drug Courts’ Effects on Criminal Offending for Juveniles and Adults

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    Drug Courts’ Effects on Criminal Offending for Juveniles and Adults

    “The objective of this review is to systematically review quasi-experimental and experimental (RCT) evaluations of the effectiveness of drug courts in reducing recidivism, including drug courts for juvenile and DWI offenders. This systematic review critically assesses drug courts’ effects on recidivism in the short- and long-term, the methodological soundness of the existing evidence, and the relationship between drug court features and effectiveness” (p. 6). Results are provided for: a description of eligible studies; overall mean effects by type of drug court; robustness of findings to methodological weaknesses; drug courts’ long-term effects; features of the drug court; and additional sensitivity analysis. Overall, research shows that adult drug courts are effective in reducing recidivism, DWI drug courts moderately successful, and juvenile drug courts having small impact.

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  • LGBTI Populations: Their Safety, Your Responsibility [Internet Broadcast]

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    LGBTI Populations: Their Safety, Your Responsibility [Internet Broadcast]

    Correctional agencies face many challenges surrounding the safe management of the populations they house and supervise. Due in part to changes in federal and state laws and the outcome of successful offender litigation, care and management of the LGBTI population has been identified as an emerging correctional issue that deserves special attention. While gender non-conforming offenders have always been present in facilities and on caseloads, we now have the opportunity to share information about this issue with a broader number of stakeholders and identify responsible and safe practices that are respectful of differences and reduce agencies’ susceptibility to liability and litigation.

    This 3-hour broadcast from November 7, 2012 is meant to inform and increase awareness of strategies for developing policies and procedures for LGBTI populations. The broadcast will highlight promising practices by providing resources and examples of agencies who are responding to the needs of the LGBTI population in their setting. During this national discussion sponsored and broadcast by the National Institute of Corrections, presenters will: define a framework for developing strategies for ensuring the safety, dignity, and respect of LGBTI individuals in corrections settings; identify typical concerns and challenges that arise as agencies address the needs and requirements of LGBTI offenders in corrections settings; identify operational practices that can increase effectiveness of working with LGBTI offenders; and review and discuss effective policy and program development strategies that address LGBTI populations in corrections.

    Video
  • A Quick Guide for LGBTI Policy Development for Adult Prisons and Jails

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    A Quick Guide for LGBTI Policy Development for Adult Prisons and Jails

    “This Quick Guide will help agencies and facilities develop a comprehensive response to working with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) inmates. It is not meant to provide an answer to every question or an in-depth discussion of all issues that agencies face or that the LGBTI population faces while in custody. It provides an overview of the important issues that agencies should consider when working to house and treat LGBTI inmates in a way that is safe and consistent with an agency’s mission, values, and security guidelines … This Quick Guide is organized chronologically according to the decisions an agency will have to make before and at the point when an LGBTI individual enters the system. These areas of focus include: Assessment of Agency Culture (as relates to LGBTI individuals); Assessment of Agency Staff and Administration Knowledge and Attitudes; Examination of Current Relevant Agency Norms; Development and Implementation Mechanisms; Development of Awareness of Current Legal Responsibilities; Foundational Issues; Intake Screening/Risk Assessment; Classification and Housing Placement; Medical and Mental Health Care; Information Management; Group Inmate Management; Specific Safety and Privacy Concerns for Transgender and Intersex Inmates; and Staff, Volunteer, and Contractor Training Requirements” (p. 1).

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  • A Quick Guide for LGBTI Policy Development for Youth Confinement Facilities

    A Quick Guide for LGBTI Policy Development for Youth Confinement Facilities Cover
    A Quick Guide for LGBTI Policy Development for Youth Confinement Facilities

    “This Quick Guide will help agencies and facilities develop a comprehensive response to working with lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) youth. It is not meant to provide an answer to every question or an in-depth discussion of all issues that agencies face or that the LGBTI population faces while in custody. It provides an overview of the important issues that agencies should consider when working to house and treat LGBTI youth in a way that is safe and consistent with an agency’s mission, values, and security guidelines … This Quick Guide is organized chronologically according to the decisions an agency will have to make before and at the point when an LGBTI youth enters the system. These areas of focus include: Assessment of Agency Culture (as relates to LGBTI individuals); Assessment of Agency Staff and Administration Knowledge and Attitudes; Examination of Current Relevant Agency Norms; Development and Implementation Mechanisms; Development of Awareness of Current Legal Responsibilities; Foundational Issues; Intake Screening/Risk Assessment; Classification and Housing Placement; Medical and Mental Health Care; Information Management; Group Youth Management; Specific Safety and Privacy Concerns for Transgender and Intersex Youth; and Staff, Volunteer, and Contractor Training Requirements” (p. 1).

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  • Children, Parents, and Incarceration: Descriptive Overview of Data from Alameda and San Francisco County Jails

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    Children, Parents, and Incarceration: Descriptive Overview of Data from Alameda and San Francisco County Jails

    "In Fall 2014, the Alameda County Children of Incarcerated Parents Partnership (ACCIPP) and the San Francisco Children of Incarcerated Parents Partnership (SFCIPP) worked in partnership with their respective Sheriffs’ Departments to survey more than 2,000 individuals incarcerated within the local county jails. The focus of the survey was to identify whom within the jails is a parent, their perceptions of how their incarceration affects their children, and what types of resources are needed for children to maintain contact and relationships with their parents during their parents’ incarceration and after release. This report presents the findings from these surveys" (p. 1).

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  • Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting Aurora, Colorado September 24-25, 2012

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    Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting Aurora, Colorado September 24-25, 2012

    Sections contained in these proceedings include: about this Large Jail Network (LJN) meeting; media relations—“Being Prepared to Have a Good Relationship” by Karla West; civilianization and volunteer work forces—“Part 1. Reassigning Officer Posts to Civilian Employees” by Art Wallenstein, “Part 2. Issues in Civilianizing Jail Posts” by Steve Kelly, and “Part 3. Using Volunteers in the Jail” by Don Pinkard; the pros and cons of outsourcing services—“Part 1. Outsourcing Services” by Glenn Kurtz, and “Part 2. Outsourcing Concerns” by Ron Eddings; jails becoming mental health centers—“Part 1. The Myth of Deinstitutionalization: Criminalizing Mental Illness” by Mark Foxall, “Part 2. Using Business Analysis Models for Process Change” by Claudia Balducci, and “Part 3. Closing a Permeable Boundary” by Margaret Severson; reentry that counts—“County of Hudson Community Reintegration Program” by Oscar Aviles; open forum; legislative and association updates; and Large Jail Network business.

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  • Best Practice Principles: Gay and Lesbian Youth in Care

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    Best Practice Principles: Gay and Lesbian Youth in Care

    “For adolescents, developing and integrating their identity can be difficult. For gay and lesbian youth, this task is greatly complicated because they must integrate an identity that diverges from mainstream society … Gay and lesbian youth need help resolving adolescent identity crises” (p. 1). This article provides guidance for out-of-home care professionals in supporting gay and lesbian youth as they figure out who they are going to be. Best practices tend to cluster around three areas: vulnerability versus empowerment—using inclusive language (being aware of heterosexist bias), picking up on hints that youth may not be heterosexual, mediating with others as youth work things out, respecting the privacy of youth, and if you don’t normally make a formal note of a youth’s heterosexuality do not mention a youth’s homosexuality; stigmatization versus validation—individualizing messages, affirming the youth, reframing differences as unique traits, nurturing the youths’ pride, and making sure the youth are seen as normal; and acceptance versus rejection—welcoming, being engaged with the youth, keeping an open mind, connecting youth with other gay and lesbian youth, and reflecting rather than instructing.

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  • Webinar Archive: Women Engaged in the Criminal Justice System

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    Webinar Archive: Women Engaged in the Criminal Justice System

    This webinar “discussed the current research and best practices related to the successful management and treatment of women in the criminal justice system … with a particular focus on behavioral health. The webinar also included a discussion about gender-specific criminogenic risk and need assessment tools, as well as the importance of responsivity for females." This website provides access to the presentation slides.

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  • LGBTI: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Offenders (Selected Resources for Criminal Justice Professionals) Annotated Bibliography

     LGBTI: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Offenders (Selected Resources for Criminal Justice Professionals) Annotated Bibliography Cover
    LGBTI: Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Offenders (Selected Resources for Criminal Justice Professionals) Annotated Bibliography

    “This annotated bibliography has been developed in an effort to provide current and useful information to correctional agencies regarding the safe and respectful management of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) offenders. Relying on a best practices approach, this information will enable corrections staff to make better informed decisions about the safety, security, treatment and care of LGBTI offenders by providing academic, cultural and legal perspectives of the issues that make this group unique” (p. 2). Citations are organized according to: general, juveniles, legal and policy considerations, and medical and mental health.

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  • Chief Jail Inspector's Network: Proceedings of the Annual Meeting

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    Chief Jail Inspector's Network: Proceedings of the Annual Meeting

    These proceedings are divided into two parts: Day One—introductions and overview, NIC Information Center, National Sheriff’s Association update, American Correctional Association Jail Standards update, Iowa, Minnesota, and Indiana standards and inspections, U.S. Marshals Service (USMS) update, and “Suicide Prevention: Current Research, Policies and Procedures, and Legal Trends; and Day Two—legal issues in today’s jails, Prison Rape Elimination Act, “Surviving in Hard Times: Marketing the Jail Inspection Process, and evaluation/close-out. Presentation slides, handouts, and additional information are contained in the attached appendixes.

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  • Addiction, The Brain, and Evidence Based Treatment

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    Addiction, The Brain, and Evidence Based Treatment

    “Dr. Chandler will discuss why punishment alone is an ineffective response to the problem of drug abuse in the criminal justice system … Dr. Chandler will also highlight evidence-based principles of addiction treatment based on an integrated public health/public safety strategy.” Topics discussed include: drugs of abuse and crime are linked; smoking in criminal justice; mental health disorders among incarcerated populations; key participants in the criminal justice system and intervention opportunities; what addiction is—a disease of the brain; reward circuits; dopamine; memory circuits; cocaine craving; treatments for relapse prevention—medications and behavioral; evidence-based principles of drug abuse treatment for criminal justice populations; what recovery looks like on average; assessing risks, needs, and progress; criminal justice CEST (Client Evaluation of Self and Treatment); and tailoring supervision to fit the needs of the individual is important.

    Webinar
  • The High Cost of Solitary Confinement

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    The High Cost of Solitary Confinement

    Wondering what is costs to house an inmate in solitary confinement? Then you want to read this article. Topics discussed include: costs in California at the Pelican Bay State Prison for the Security Housing Unit (SHU) and Administrative Segregation Unit (ASU); costs at Illinois’ Tamms Correctional Center; cost for Colorado; costs in Ohio, Texas, and Maryland; costs for the Federal Bureau of Prisons; construction costs; and reforms that lead to cost savings.

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  • Health, Justice, Women: Transforming Systems--Changing Lives [Internet Broadcast]

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    Health, Justice, Women: Transforming Systems--Changing Lives [Internet Broadcast]

    Women and girls enter the criminal justice system with distinct and unique health care needs. Most are in their child bearing years, may have children, many are victims of abuse, have a mental health diagnosis, or typically exhibit more misconduct than male offenders. This complex mix of needs affects a system's ability to work effectively as it draws upon a higher percentage of resources to care for female offenders.

    During this national discussion held on August 15, 2012, participants will explore research, strategies, and resources designed to effect health care practices used with justice-involved women. At the conclusion of this broadcast, participants will be able to: Define and describe the unique health care needs of women involved with the justice system; Apply the public health model to working with justice-involved women in corrections settings; Express the critical role leaders play in creating systems and organizational processes that meet the health care needs of justice-involved women; and Identify strategies, resources, and partnerships that address the health care needs of justice-involved women as they reenter their communities.

    Video
  • The Importance of a Low Span of Control in Effective Implementation of Evidence Based Probation and Parole Practices

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    The Importance of a Low Span of Control in Effective Implementation of Evidence Based Probation and Parole Practices

    This report explains why the current probation officer to supervisor ratio (7:1 span of control) should not be increased to a higher level due to significant impacts on the implementation and sustainability of evidence-based practices (EBPs) in the Community Based Correctional System in Iowa. Span of control is “the number of individuals, or resources, that a person can effectively supervise within a structured organizational, business of military setting” (p. i). Sections of this report following an executive summary are: the importance of a low span of control in effective implementation of EBPs for probation and parole; findings on the impact of this low span of control; probation officer competencies; application of theoretical span of control factors to an EBP probation and parole environment; and conclusions and considerations.

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  • Security Threat Groups on the Inside

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    Security Threat Groups on the Inside

    Answers to frequently asked questions about Security Threat Groups (STGs) or prison gangs are provided. Topics covered include: what a STG is; the 12 STGs recognized in Texas prisons; why an offender joins a STG; what the indicators of STG membership are; how STGs recruit members; what administrative segregation is; what a STG can do to your family if your son/daughter joins; what STG members and/or their family and friends face upon their release from prison; and what to do to get out of a STG.

    Document
  • Balancing Fiscal Challenges, Performance-Based Budgeting and Public Safety: A Compilation of Panel Testimonies

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    Balancing Fiscal Challenges, Performance-Based Budgeting and Public Safety: A Compilation of Panel Testimonies

    This collection contains testimony regarding cost benefit and cost containment measures. Contents are:

    Day 1. “Briefing on the Fiscal Costs of Corrections in the United States” by Mary Livers; “High Cost, Low Return” by Adam Gelb; “Outcome-Based Budgeting: Process and Practice” by Chris Innes; “Current State Fiscal Conditions & the Impact on Corrections” by Brian Sigritz; “Outcome-based Budgeting” by Karen Wilson; “Systems Approach to Cost Containment” by Theresa Lantz; “Cost-Effective Strategies for Meeting Policy Requirements and Legislative Mandates”--Testimony of F. Franklin Amanat and Presentation by Gary Mohr; “Reengineering Population Management”—Written Testimony by Michael Jacobson; “Projecting the Future of Corrections” by James Austin; Presentation by Ed Monahan; “Kentucky Pretrial Risk Assessment Instrument Validation” by James Austin, Roger Ocker, and Avi Bhati; “Criminal Law Reform: The First Year of HB 463” handout; and “Sheriff Stan Hilkey’s Remarks: An Evidence Based Decision Making Experience: Mesa County, Colorado.

    Day 2. “Budgetary Approaches to Providing Services for Offender Health Care”—Testimony by Newton E. Kendig, and Testimony by Jim Degroot; “Reducing Medical Cost in a Correction System” by Joseph Ponte; Remarks from J. John Ashe; “Innovative Cost-Saving Strategies in Pharmaceutical Expenditures” by A. Martin Johnston; “Cost Containment: Opportunities for Continued Reform” by Bernard Warner; “Results First: Targeting Criminal Justice Resources at Programs that Work” by Gary VanLandingham; “Evidence Based Decision Making Initiative” by Madeline “Mimi” Carter; “Opportunity versus Obligations”—Testimony by Sandra Matheson and Testimony by Mindy Tarlow; and “Capability and Capacity: Understanding NIC’s Delivery of Services” by Jim Cosby.

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  • Correctional Institution Inspection Committee: Security Threat Groups

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    Correctional Institution Inspection Committee: Security Threat Groups

    Issues related to security threat groups (STGs) in Ohio prisons are covered. Sections of this brief are: what a security threat group is; what they do; what the largest STGs are in Ohio prisons; STG statistics; STG management; STG identification; number of inmates identified as STG members by institution; and STG members by percent of institution population.

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  • Applying the APEX Tools for Organizational Assessment

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    Applying the APEX Tools for Organizational Assessment

    “Previously, not many assessment tools looked at issues that specifically affect those who work in the field of corrections … [This book] presents three organizational assessment tools developed specifically for the field of corrections. The APEX assessment tools are designed to look at an agency’s readiness to take on a change process, understand the importance of safety and security to correctional operations, measure performance on the APEX Public Safety Model’s eight domains, and provide guidance for developing a performance improvement plan” (p. vii). Five chapters are contained in this publication: introduction; how to use the APEX Assessment Tools Protocol; APEX Screener; APEX Organizational Profile; and the APEX Inventory. The three tools are bundled with this publication.

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  • Criminal Alien Statistics: Information on Incarcerations, Arrests, and Costs

    Criminal Alien Statistics: Information on Incarcerations, Arrests, and Costs

    “This report addresses (1) the number and nationalities of incarcerated criminal aliens; (2) the types of offenses for which criminal aliens were arrested and convicted; and (3) the costs associated with incarcerating criminal aliens and the extent to which DOJ's methodology for reimbursing states and localities for incarcerating criminal aliens is current and relevant.” Statistics are provided for criminal alien incarcerations and nationalities, criminal alien arrests and convictions, estimated costs of criminal alien incarcerations; and agency and third-party comments. “Based on our random sample, GAO estimates that the criminal aliens had an average of 7 arrests, 65 percent were arrested at least once for an immigration offense, and about 50 percent were arrested at least once for a drug offense. Immigration, drugs, and traffic violations accounted for about 50 percent of arrest offenses. About 90 percent of the criminal aliens sentenced in federal court in fiscal year 2009 (the most recently available data) were convicted of immigration and drug-related offenses. About 40 percent of individuals convicted as a result of DOJ terrorism-related investigations were aliens.” The average cost to incarcerate criminal aliens is $1.5 billion per year.

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  • SOTIPS: Sex Offender Treatment Intervention and Progress Scale

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    SOTIPS: Sex Offender Treatment Intervention and Progress Scale

    “The Sex Offender Treatment Intervention and Progress Scale (SOTIPS) is a statistically-derived dynamic measure designed to aid clinicians, correctional caseworkers, and probation and parole officers in assessing risk, treatment and supervision needs, and progress among adult males who have been convicted of one or more qualifying sexual offenses and committed at least one of these sexual offenses after their 18th birthday … SOTIPS item scores are intended to reflect an individual's relative treatment and supervision needs on each risk factor. The SOTIPS total score is intended to provide an estimation of an individual's overall level of dynamic risk and need for supervision and treatment” (p. 1). Sections of this manual include: overview and administration; item descriptions and scoring criteria; and the SOTIPS scoring sheet.

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  • State of the Science of Pretrial Release Recommendations and Supervision

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    State of the Science of Pretrial Release Recommendations and Supervision

    Anyone needing to know what legal issues impact pretrial release or what supervision strategies will lead to more effective pretrial release practices should read this report. Sections of this document include: introduction; pretrial legal questions—“blanket” pretrial release condition, drug testing release condition, treatment and assessment release condition, Alcoholics Anonymous/12-Step meetings release condition, pretrial supervision fees, and delegation of judicial authority; national pretrial specific research—pretrial release conditions and interventions and pretrial release types; guidelines for pretrial release recommendations and differential pretrial supervision; and conclusion.

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  • Caseflow Management Guide

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    Caseflow Management Guide

    Anyone looking to develop an effective caseflow management plan should read this guide. It explains how to create and improve caseflow management systems. Chapters comprising this publication are: introduction to caseflow management; reasons for managing caseflow; identifying a caseflow management problem; developing a caseflow management plan—components and fundamental elements; case management and information systems—minimum standards, staff responsibilities and types of reports; implementing a caseflow management plan—changing the legal culture, reasons for resistance to caseflow management, how to effectively produce change, long-term and short-term plans, convening a team, and disseminating information; alternative dispute resolution and caseflow; and reporting requirements. Appended is an example of a model caseflow management plan.

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  • The Effects of Prison Visitation on Offender Recidivism

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    The Effects of Prison Visitation on Offender Recidivism

    The influence visitation has on the recidivism of visited prisoners is examined. Sections of this report include: research summary; introduction; prison visitation policies; reentry and social support; prison visitation research; methodology; results for descriptive statistics, impact of visitation on time to first felony reconviction, impact of visitation on time to first revocation, and impact of inmate-visitor relationship on time to first reconviction; conclusion; and implications for correctional policy and practice. Visitation has a significant effect on recidivism. “Any visit reduced the risk of recidivism by 13 percent for felony reconvictions and 25 percent for technical violation revocations, which reflects the fact that visitation generally had a greater impact on revocations. The findings further showed that more frequent and recent visits were associated with a decreased risk of recidivism” (p. 27).

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  • Kept Out: Barriers to Meaningful Education in the School-to-Prison Pipeline

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    Kept Out: Barriers to Meaningful Education in the School-to-Prison Pipeline

    <p>“’Keep Out’ is a phenomenon that occurs when students try to reenter a setting where they can access meaningful education and are denied by the policies and practices of the education and juvenile justice systems. Keep Out is a part of the larger School-To-Prison Pipeline. The Pipeline includes disciplinary and discretionary policies that push youth out of school and into the criminal justice system” (p. 7). This report examines the barriers that exist for youth seeking an education following a removal from school. Sections of this report following an executive summary are: introduction; findings about formal and informal policies and practices, lack of coordination and assistance, and failure to educate and support the whole child; conclusion; and recommendations addressing the report’s findings.</p>

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  • Performance Measurement for Justice Information System Projects

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    Performance Measurement for Justice Information System Projects

    The crafting of performance measures and those for criminal justice information sharing are discussed. “The guide helps managers, staff, and executives develop measures in two ways: by offering comments and advice on the process of developing measures, and by providing a catalog of workable examples for specific types of project” (p. 1). Nine chapters are contained in this publication: introduction—what performance measures are; which goals the project helps us achieve; how the project assists us in achieving our goals; what the best measures of the agency’s goals are; how performance measures can best be implemented; introduction to performance measures for criminal justice information sharing; summary of performance measures; project type examples from the Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) to the Warrant Depository; and how to use this guide and final thoughts. An appendix explains the Chain of Results and Logic Model.

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  • It's About Time: Prevention and Intervention Services for Gang-Affiliated Girls

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    It's About Time: Prevention and Intervention Services for Gang-Affiliated Girls

    “This NCCD Focus highlights the vulnerabilities and consequences of gang involvement for girls, the service needs of girls in gangs and girls at risk of joining gangs, as well as the importance of addressing these service needs as a critical gang violence-prevention strategy. It also provides examples of how various programs are currently addressing the gender-specific service needs of girls involved in gangs” (p. 1). Sections of this publication include: introduction; risk factors and costs for girls; the view from service providers—the service needs of girls at risk of gang involvement (life skill classes, mentorship, and peer support), the service needs of girls in gangs (sexual abuse and gang desistance), the service needs of girls in juvenile halls (legal education services, recidivism prevention, and creative therapeutic services); examples of programming and services for girls—Girls & Gangs, Kevin Grant Consulting, Barrios Unidos, Fathers & Families of San Joaquin, and Operation Peacekeeper; and conclusion.

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  • Ten Truths that Matter When Working with Justice Involved Women

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    Ten Truths that Matter When Working with Justice Involved Women

    “This document reviews ten truths about justice involved women—gleaned from the research over the last few decades —that must be recognized if we are to successfully manage this population, achieve greater reductions in recidivism, and improve public safety outcomes. It is our hope that by understanding these truths, criminal justice policymakers and practitioners will be more aware of gender differences and take steps to enhance their approaches to managing justice involved women” (p. iii). Some of these truths are: women are a fast-growing criminal justice population, yet they pose a lower public safety risk than men; traditional criminal justice policies and practices have largely been developed through the lens of managing men, not women; gender responsive assessment tools can enhance case management efforts with justice involved women; women are more likely to respond favorably when criminal justice staff adhere to evidence-based, gender responsive principles; and the costs of overly involving women in the criminal justice system are high.

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  • Engaging Women in Trauma-Informed Peer Support: A Guidebook

    Engaging Women in Trauma-Informed Peer Support: A Guidebook Cover
    Engaging Women in Trauma-Informed Peer Support: A Guidebook

    The fundamentals, cultural considerations, and actions to be taken to address trauma through peer support are explained. “This guide was created for a very specific purpose: to help make trauma-informed peer support available to women who are trauma survivors and who receive or have received mental health and/or substance abuse services. It is designed as a resource for peer supporters in these or other settings who want to learn how to integrate trauma-informed principles into their relationships with the women they support or into the peer support groups they are members of. The goal is to provide peer supporters—both male and female—with the understanding, tools, and resources needed to engage in culturally responsive, trauma-informed peer support relationships with women trauma survivors” (p. 1). Thirteen chapters are in this publication: introduction to trauma and trauma-informed practices; whether one is a trauma survivor or not; peer support fundamentals; gender policies and the criminalization of women; culture and trauma; religion, spirituality, and trauma; trauma-informed peer support across the lifespan; trauma and peer support relationships; self-awareness and self-care; organizational context—working in systems; trauma-informed storytelling and other healing practices; self-inflicted violence and peer support; and reclaiming power through social action.

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  • Achieving Performance Excellence: The Influence of Leadership on Organizational Performance

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    Achieving Performance Excellence: The Influence of Leadership on Organizational Performance

    “Leadership is a very important component of higher performing organizations. This book presents a breadth and depth of information about leading others and describes what leaders need to excel at and what up-and-coming leaders need to know as they prepare themselves for leadership positions. Taking a balanced approach to leadership allows correctional leaders to influence different people and diverse stakeholder groups in differing situations. Good leaders know when they need to manage rather than lead and how these two activities differ” (p. 71). Chapters cover: an introduction; focus on the leader; leadership of others ad beyond; leadership that is transforming; case study—collaboration shifts a dysfunctional culture; and case study—new leadership as a catalyst for change.

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  • WSIPP’s Benefit-Cost Tool for States: Examining Policy Options in Sentencing and Corrections

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    WSIPP’s Benefit-Cost Tool for States: Examining Policy Options in Sentencing and Corrections

    The development and implementation of an analytical tool that helps states determine which evidence-based practices are most cost effective in preventing crime and lowering correctional costs. “The project’s overall goal is to use the best information available to identify sentencing and corrections policies that can help states protect public safety and control taxpayer costs. To accomplish this goal, we have constructed a benefit-cost “investment” model that estimates crime and fiscal outcomes of different combinations of public policies” (p. 1). Sections of this report that follow a summary include: background; project element 1—development of the sentencing tool; project element 2—application of the tool to Washington’s policy process; and project element 3—software development and next steps.

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  • APEX Resources Directory Vol. 2: Communications, Focus Groups, and Development

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    APEX Resources Directory Vol. 2: Communications, Focus Groups, and Development

    “APEX Resources Directory Volume 2 provides supportive information to correctional agencies embarking on the APEX (Achieving Performance Excellence) journey. It introduces the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) Information Center, provides detailed information on creating a communications plan for those implementing the APEX Initiative, describes how to use focus groups to effectively gather information and feed-back, and includes a team development guide for those who want to build teams, enhance team performance, and understand what makes teams an effective part of any organization” (p. 1). Chapters following a view of achieving performance excellence are: introduction; NIC resources; APEX Communication Plan; focus groups—a practical guide; and team development guide; and book summary.

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  • Report on Sexual Victimization in Prisons and Jails

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    Report on Sexual Victimization in Prisons and Jails

    “This Report presents the findings of the Review Panel on Prison Rape (Panel) related to the hearings it held in Washington, DC, in the spring and fall of 2011. Based on the national survey that the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) published in August 2010, Sexual Victimization in Prisons and Jails, Reported by Inmates, 2008-09, the Panel’s hearings focused on the experiences of selected correctional institutions that had either a high or low prevalence of inmate sexual victimization. The Panel’s goal in issuing this Report is to assist correctional practitioners by identifying common themes and making recommendations for further research that will lead to effective practices that prevent sexual victimization in prisons and jails” (p. 1). Sections contained in this report are: overview; review of facilities—low-incidence, high-incidence, common themes, and topics for further study for prions and for jails; and conclusion.

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  • State Criminal Laws Prohibiting Sexual Abuse of Individuals Under Community Corrections Supervision

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    State Criminal Laws Prohibiting Sexual Abuse of Individuals Under Community Corrections Supervision

    This map shows those states that do or do not have laws prohibiting the sexual abuse of individuals under community corrections supervision.

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  • State Criminal Laws Prohibiting Sexual Abuse of Individuals in Custody

    State Criminal Laws Cover
    State Criminal Laws Prohibiting Sexual Abuse of Individuals in Custody

    This map shows those states that do or do not have laws prohibiting the sexual abuse of individuals in custody.

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  • State Criminal Laws Prohibiting Sexual Abuse of Individuals in Lock-Ups

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    State Criminal Laws Prohibiting Sexual Abuse of Individuals in Lock-Ups

    This map shows those states that do or do not have laws prohibiting the sexual abuse of individuals in lock-ups.

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  • State Criminal Laws Prohibiting Sexual Abuse of Individuals in Jails

    State Criminal Laws Cover
    State Criminal Laws Prohibiting Sexual Abuse of Individuals in Jails

    This map shows those states that do or do not have laws prohibiting the sexual abuse of individuals in jails.

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  • Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting Aurora, Colorado September 19-21, 2011

    Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting Aurora, Colorado September 19-21, 2011 Cover
    Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting Aurora, Colorado September 19-21, 2011

    Sections contained in these proceedings include: about this Large Jail Network (LJN) meeting; meeting highlights; “Recovering the Prince George’s County Jail” by Mary Lou McDonough and Gregory O. Harris; Employee Management—Applicants, Discipline, and Rumor Control—“Preventing and Handling Staff Issues” by Marilyn Chandler Ford and “Steering Through Storms” by Curtis Flowers; Technology Updates—“Pilot Project: Remote Visitation” by Debra Campbell and “Technology: What is Out There?” by Glenn Kurtz; Dealing with Family Medical Leave Act Abuses—“Understanding the Family and Medical Leave Act” by Janet Wilson and “Reducing FMLA Abuse” by Marilyn Chandler Ford; “The Prescription Drug Epidemic and Jails: Stopping the ‘Pill Mills’” by Ed Beckman; legislative and association updates; open forum; and Large Jail Network business.

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  • Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting Aurora, Colorado March 18-20, 2012

    Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting Aurora, Colorado March 18-20, 2012 Cover
    Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting Aurora, Colorado March 18-20, 2012

    Sections contained in these proceedings include: about this Large Jail Network (LJN) meeting; meeting highlights; “Program Session: Legal Issue Update” by William C. Collins; Program Session: Technology Update” by Glenn Kurtz; “Program Session: Inmate Behavior Management” by Randy Demory; “Program Session: Regulatory Investigations Affecting Jails” by Tim Ryan; open forum; legislation and association news; and Large Jail Network business.

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  • Managing Aging and Terminally Ill Inmates[Videoconference held on September 12, 2001]

    Managing Aging and Terminally Ill Inmates[Videoconference held on September 12, 2001] Cover
    Managing Aging and Terminally Ill Inmates[Videoconference held on September 12, 2001]

    This program discusses Information regarding current policies and procedures and their impact on aging offenders and offenders with chronic and terminal illnesses. While focusing upon "best practices and interventions," this program discusses:

    • Differences between the needs of aging and terminally ill inmates;
    • Management strategies;
    • Internal and external challenges, such as staffing, supervision, treatment standards, compassionate release provisions, housing, and hospice care;
    • Selecting and training inmate caregivers;
    • Legal issues, such as advance directives and constitutional standards of care;
    • And appropriate programming resources.
    Video
  • EDUCAUSE E-Learning

    EDUCAUSE E-Learning Cover
    EDUCAUSE E-Learning

    A huge collection of links regarding E-Learning can be found at this website. Resources include overviews, publications, presentations, policies, podcasts, and blogs covering the field of E-Learning. You can lose yourself for days looking over all the resources presented (1015 as of 2-21-12). While this website caters to teachers in higher education, its resources can be tailored to fit most any situation the material is needed for.

    Web Page
  • Standards of Care for the Health of Transsexual, Transgender, and Gender Nonconforming People

    Standards of Care for health cover
    Standards of Care for the Health of Transsexual, Transgender, and Gender Nonconforming People

    “The overall goal of the SOC [Standards of Care] is to provide clinical guidance for health professionals to assist transsexual, transgender, and gender nonconforming people with safe and effective pathways to achieving lasting personal comfort with their gendered selves, in order to maximize their overall health, psychological well-being, and self-fulfillment … While this is primarily a document for health professionals, the SOC may also be used by individuals, their families, and social institutions to understand how they can assist with promoting optimal health for members of this diverse population” (p. 1). Sections of this publication are: purpose and use of the SOP; global applicability; the difference between gender nonconformity and gender dysphoria; assessment and treatment of children and adolescents with gender dysphoria; mental health; hormone therapy; reproductive health; voice and communication therapy; surgery; postoperative care and follow-up; lifelong prevention and primary care; applicability of SOP to people living in institutional environments; and applicability of SOP to people with disorders of sex development. Appendixes include: glossary; overview of medical risks of hormone therapy; summary of criteria for hormone therapy and surgeries; and evidence for clinical outcomes of therapeutic approaches.

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  • Outcome Evaluation of the Women Offender Case Management Model in Connecticut Probation

    Outcome Evaluation of the Women Offender Case Management Model in Connecticut Probation Cover
    Outcome Evaluation of the Women Offender Case Management Model in Connecticut Probation

    “The outcome evaluation [for the Women Offender Case Management Model (WOCMM) implemented in Connecticut probation] focuses on determining whether participation in the project reduces future involvement in the criminal justice system as measured by recidivism over a fixed length follow-up period. The outcome evaluation employs a comparison group to determine if participants have more positive outcomes than a group of women with similar characteristics who were not exposed to the model” (p. 1). Recidivism rates are provided for WOCMM participants and the retrospective comparison matched sample for misdemeanor arrest, misdemeanor arrest with conviction, felony arrest, felony arrest with conviction, any arrest, any arrest with conviction, and any negative outcome (including arrests as well as absconding and technical violations). It appears that WOCMM offers a positive gender-responsive impact resulting in lower recidivism rates for project participants.

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  • Exercises for Developing MI Skills in Corrections

    Exercises for Developing MI Skills in Corrections Cover
    Exercises for Developing MI Skills in Corrections

    Motivational interviewing (MI) helps clients become less ambivalent about altering their maladaptive behaviors. This publication presents “scenarios that agents commonly encounter in their efforts to monitor and reinforce court/parole/institutional conditions and address clients’ central eight criminogenic needs. This book also considers the learning tasks of MI in relation to the eight principles for effective interventions outlined in Implementing Evidence-Based Practice in Community Corrections: The Principles of Effective Intervention, an NIC publication. Ordered in the sequence in which they are most commonly learned or mastered, the first five of these eight tasks for learning MI provide the structure for Exercises for Developing MI Skills in Corrections.” Chapters relating to these five tasks are: the spirit of motivational interviewing; active listening; recognizing and reinforcing change talk; eliciting and strengthening change talk; and responding to resistance. A glossary of related terms is also included.

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  • Motivational Interviewing in Corrections-National Institute of Corrections-DC Public Safety Radio

    Motivational Interviewing in Corrections-National Institute of Corrections-DC Public Safety Radio

    <p>"The program interviews Bradford Bogue, Director of Justice System, Assessment and Training and a motivational interviewer trainer since 1993 and Anjali Nandi, Program Director of the Center for Change. She has been a member of the International Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers since 2003. Both coauthored a document for the National Institute of Corrections titled Motivational Interviewing in Corrections: A Comprehensive Guide to Implementing MI in Corrections at https://nicic.gov/motivational-interviewing-corrections-comprehensive-gu...

    Audio
  • Using Data in Multi-Agency Collaborations: Guiding Performance to Ensure Accountability and Improve Programs

    Using Data in Multi-Agency Collaborations: Guiding Performance to Ensure Accountability and Improve Programs Cover
    Using Data in Multi-Agency Collaborations: Guiding Performance to Ensure Accountability and Improve Programs

    “This report is designed to help collaborating organizations anticipate and address the most common challenges associated with multi-agency performance management systems” (p. 6). Individuals in agencies that are collaborating to reach the same ends can find great strategies for strengthening their bonds and reaching success. This guide includes these sections: introduction; getting started; making it work; using data to improve the initiative; and sustaining the system.

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  • Gender-Responsive Program Assessment Tool

    Gender-Responsive Program Assessment Tool Cover
    Gender-Responsive Program Assessment Tool

    “The Gender-Responsive Program Assessment tool is an instrument by which program administrators, program evaluators, agency monitors and staff can evaluate the gender responsiveness of programs for women and girls and obtain feedback that can be used to improve the quality of a program’s services” (p. 1). This tool allows one to evaluate these program elements: theoretical foundation and mission statement; site and facility; administration and staffing; program environment and culture; treatment planning; program development; and program assessment.

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  • Culture and Change Management: Using APEX to Facilitate Organizational Change

    Culture and Change Management: Using APEX to Facilitate Organizational Change Cover
    Culture and Change Management: Using APEX to Facilitate Organizational Change

    “Culture, including beliefs, assumptions, values, norms, and practices in an organization, determines the success of an organization’s performance and change efforts. This book helps illuminate the role culture plays in an organization that is striving for higher performance ... Knowledge of culture enables an organization to proceed along the path to successful change. The APEX Change Management Model provides a process and map for organizational change based in research and best practices; it engages the human component of the organization to ensure success” (p. 85). Eight chapters follow an introduction to Achieving Performance Excellence (APEX): introduction; organizational culture and change; introduction to change management; APEX Change Management Model; additional elements of successful change management; communications planning during change; change management principles and practices in action—Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA); and changing culture during challenging times.

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  • The Effects of Solitary Confinement: Commentary on One Year Longitudinal Study of the Psychological Effects of Administrative Segregation

    The Effects of Solitary Confinement cover
    The Effects of Solitary Confinement: Commentary on One Year Longitudinal Study of the Psychological Effects of Administrative Segregation

    The author comments on research done by the Colorado Department of Corrections and the University of Colorado’s Department of Psychology concerning the effects of solitary confinement. Sections of this article include: the Colorado study; why available research was not used the authors of the Colorado study; available European studies on the effects of solitary confinement; social contact and contamination across groups; whether the study participants were harmed by solitary confinement prior to the study; how the self-reported data was obtained; crisis events, hospitalization, and objective data; and conclusion. Since the research by Colorado was severely flawed, “[i]t is therefore extremely difficult to gain any valuable information about the effects of AS [administrative segregation] and solitary confinement from the Colorado study” (p. 9).

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