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Recently found corrections resources available online.
New in the Library
Myths & Facts - Using Risk and Need Assessments to Enhance Outcomes and Reduce Disparities in the Criminal Justice System
Posted: 3 days ago
(2017) The Community Corrections Collaborative Network (CCCN) is a network comprised of the leading associations representing 90,000-plus probation, parole, pretrial, and treatment professionals around the country, including the American Probation and Parole Association (APPA), the Association of Paroling Authorities International (APAI), the Federal Probation and Pretrial Officers Association (FPPOA), the International Community Corrections Association (ICCA), the National Association of Drug Court Professionals (NADCP), the National Association of Pretrial Services Agencies (NAPSA), and the National Association of Probation Executives (NAPE). This "Myths & Facts" package includes a one-page list of myths and facts along with a research-based supporting document to help dispel three specific myths regarding the use of risk and need assessments within the criminal justice system. A description and relevant research to dispel each myth is provided. Our network believes that risk and need assessments currently provide the most accurate, objective prediction of the risk to recidivate. While risk and need assessments do not predict with perfect accuracy, they guide practitioners in the field towards the most accurate and equitable decisions available for safely managing justice-involved individuals.
New in the Library
A Framework for Pretrial Justice: Essential Elements of an Effective Pretrial System and Agency
Posted: 4 weeks ago
(2017) This document highlights the commitment of the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) to define and support evidence-based practices that improve decision-making at the pretrial stage of our criminal justice system, enhancing the safety of America’s communities and fostering the fair administration of pretrial release and detention. With the release of A Framework for Pretrial Justice: Essential Elements of an Effective Pretrial System and Agency, NIC and its Pretrial Executive Network helps inform the discussion on bail reform and pretrial justice by presenting and defining the fundamentals of an effective pretrial system and the essential elements of a high functioning pretrial services agency. This publication presents and describes these essential elements—as well as the components of an evidence-based framework for improving pretrial outcomes nationwide. Bail determination is one of the most important decisions in criminal justice. Courts that make evidence-based decisions set the following as goals: (1) Protecting community safety; (2) Ensuring a defendant’s return to court; (3) Basing release and detention decisions on an individual defendant’s risk and the community’s norms for liberty; [and] (4) Providing judicial officers with clear, legal options for appropriate pretrial release and detention decisions. A Framework for Pretrial Justice: Essential Elements of an Effective Pretrial System and Agency should serve as a guide for jurisdictions interested in improving their current pretrial systems. By presenting a framework of evidence-based and best practices, NIC supports the equally important concepts of pretrial justice and enhanced public safety in all of America’s courts.
New in the Library
Leadership Annotated Bibliography
Posted: 5 weeks ago
(2017) This annotated bibliography provides current and useful information about leadership to corrections professionals. There are many different theories about leadership. A leader needs to be aware of them because different styles of leadership may be needed for differing situations. In the end, results of good leadership will include high morale, employee retention, and sustainable success over the long run. This bibliography touches on a few of the main theories, and looks at the impact of leadership on various groups and succession planning. Topics covered are: general; various leadership types—adaptive leadership, authentic leadership, change leadership, emotional intelligence, ethical leadership, leader-member exchange (LMX), servant leadership, and virtuous leadership; leading generations; women and leadership; leadership and diversity; leadership development; leadership in corrections; and succession planning.
New in the Library
Incarceration Rates and Traits of Sexual Minorities in the United States: National Inmate Survey, 2011–2012
Posted: 6 weeks ago
(2017) This report examines the "characteristics of sexual minority US inmates … Sexual minorities (those who self-identify as lesbian, gay, or bisexual or report a same-sex sexual experience before arrival at the facility) were disproportionately incarcerated: 9.3% of men in prison, 6.2% of men in jail, 42.1% of women in prison, and 35.7% of women in jail were sexual minorities. The incarceration rate of self-identified lesbian, gay, or bisexual persons was 1882 per 100 000, more than 3 times that of the US adult population. Compared with straight inmates, sexual minorities were more likely to have been sexually victimized as children, to have been sexually victimized while incarcerated, to have experienced solitary confinement and other sanctions, and to report current psychological distress …There is disproportionate incarceration, mistreatment, harsh punishment, and sexual victimization of sexual minority inmates, which calls for special public policy and health intervention" (p. 234). American Journal of Health-System Pharmacy (AJHP) v. 107 n. 2, p. 234-240.
New in the Library
Shackled to Debt: Criminal Justice Financial Obligations and the Barriers to Re-Entry They Create
Posted: 10 weeks ago
(2017) The "authors discuss the long-term and unintended consequences of criminal justice financial obligations (CJFOs): fines, forfeiture of property, court fees, supervision fees, and restitution." [They] "describe trends in the assessment of CJFOs, discuss the historical context within which these trends have unfolded, and reflect on their unintended (but perhaps easily foreseen) consequences. We then treat restitution separately, given the distinct function (in theory at least) that restitution serves. We also raise serious concerns about how restitution tends to be implemented and who benefits from this particular obligation. We end by considering alternative models for the effective and fair deployment of fines, fees and restitution in the criminal justice context" (p. 2).
New in the Library
How Many Americans Are Unnecessarily Incarcerated?
Posted: 11 weeks ago
(2016) "Nearly 40 percent of the U.S. prison population — 576,000 people — are behind bars with no compelling public safety reason, according to a new report from the Brennan Center for Justice at NYU School of Law. The first-of-its-kind analysis provides a blueprint for how the country can drastically cut its prison population while still keeping crime rates near historic lows." Sections cover: the current prison population; time served in prison today; ending prison for lower-level crimes; reducing time served for other crimes; and recommendations and cost savings.
New in the Library
Should Social Media Be Banned in Prison?
Posted: 12 weeks ago
(2017) Issues surrounding the use of social media in U.S. prisons are discussed, including security, rehabilitation, and whether the use of social media and the internet are protected by the First Amendment.
New in the Library
Building Trust and Legitimacy Within Community Corrections
Posted: 13 weeks ago
(2016) “What the authors of this report have done is exemplify the importance of community corrections. Probation has the power to keep individuals in their community, working toward positive change and better outcomes for themselves, their families, and their communities.” - Jim Cosby, Past Director, National Institute of Corrections "This paper will discuss the need for a new model for community corrections that can improve public safety while recognizing that people on probation and parole are members of the communities in which they live and are supervised" (p. 3). Six general principles which provide the foundation for this new model of community corrections are described.
New in the Library
Aiming to Reduce Time-In-Cell: Reports from Correctional Systems on the Numbers of Prisoners in Restricted Housing and on the Potential of Policy Changes to Bring About Reforms
Posted: 14 weeks ago
(2016) This report "provides the only current, comprehensive data on the use of restricted housing, in which individuals are held in their cells for 22 hours or more each day, and for 15 continuous days or more at a time. The Report also documents efforts across the country to reduce the number of people in restricted housing and to reform the conditions in which isolated prisoners are held in order to improve safety for prisoners, staff, and communities at large" (p. 1).
New in the Library
Restrictive Housing: Roadmap to Reform [Internet Broadcast]
Posted: 15 weeks ago
(2016) “Do we really think it makes sense to lock so many people alone in tiny cells for 23 hours a day for months, sometime for years at a time? That is not going to make us safer. It’s not going to make us stronger. If those individuals are ultimately released, how are they ever going to adapt? It’s not smart.” – President Barack Obama, NAACP National Convention speech, July 14, 2015. The use of Restrictive Housing poses some of the most challenging questions facing corrections professionals: How should correctional agencies manage their most violent and disruptive inmates? How can they best protect their most vulnerable and victimized ones? And what is the safest and most humane way to do so? The Department of Justice (DOJ) and the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) define “restrictive housing” as a form of housing that involves three basic elements: removal from the general inmate population, whether voluntary or involuntary; placement in a locked room or cell, whether alone or with another inmate; and inability to leave the room or cell for the vast majority of the day, typically 22 hours or more. Restrictive housing takes many forms, and an inmate’s experience can vary considerably depending on certain external factors, such as length of stay, conditions of confinement, and degree of social isolation, as well as factors specific to each inmate, such as age and psychological resiliency. This training broadcast will: examine restrictive housing practices in your agency and compare and contrast those with the DOJ Guiding Principles; explore the Guiding Principles and implications for restrictive housing practice and conditions of confinement; use interactive activities and action planning to determine strategies for your agency to safely reduce the use of restrictive housing in your agency; and share promising practices and recommendations for the implementation of the Guiding Principles. This broadcast will answer the following questions: How should prisons and other correctional facilities manage their most violent and dangerous inmates? How can they best protect their most vulnerable and victimized inmates? What is the safest and most humane way to do so? Why did the Department of Justice create a set of Guiding Principles on the effective use of Restrictive Housing? How can we use the DOJ Guiding Principles to self-evaluate our current agency practice?
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News
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Important corrections news and announcements.
Corrections News
Call for NIC Technical Resource Providers - Basic Jail Academy Curriculum Subject Matter Experts
Posted: 3 days ago
Deadline: May 5, 2017 The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) Jails Division is conducting market research and seeks to immediately identify subject matter experts with demonstrated experience in developing, implementing and evaluating basic jail academy curriculum with specific content emphasis on the use of force. Responding to this information request does not constitute any binding agreement between the respondent and the United States Government. Qualifications of Technical Resource Providers: The contractor/TRP must have a minimum of ten (10) years of experience in jail operations and training, a minimum of ten (10) years of experience in training correctional professionals, and is expected to conduct his/her assignment professionally and responsibly. HOW TO APPLY Qualifications of Technical Resource Providers: Send a current resume or vitae, in Word or PDF format, to samos@bop.gov no later than May 5, 2017. Please include the following in the subject line of your
Corrections News
Cooperative Agreement: Crisis Intervention Team Training Curriculum Enhancement
Posted: 5 days ago
The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is seeking applications for funding under the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017. This cooperative agreement is for the solicitation of proposals to enter into a 12-month cooperative agreement to review and revise the existing 40-hour CIT classroom-based training program designed to be delivered to 30 participants. Goals, Objectives, and Deliverables The goal of this cooperative agreement will be to revise the curriculum for the CIT Training Program which trains jail systems and state departments of corrections staff. The successful applicant must be an expert in curriculum design who will work with the subject matter experts and peer reviewers identified by the NIC Project Manager. The program s objectives should include the following: Understand the tenets of CIT training based on the Memphis Model. Review and revise the existing CIT Training curriculum. Update the statistics in the current training. Develop additional CIT training curricul
Corrections News
Cooperative Agreement: Reentry Employment Series - Training and Coaching Facilitation
Posted: 2 weeks ago
Updated: See questions and answers below The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is seeking applications for funding under the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017). Work under this cooperative involves the management. Overview: In order to assist justice involved adults with maintaining long-term attachments to the workforce, practitioners must be able to assess those at high risk for job loss, identify specific criminogenic risks, and develop programming in response to identified risk/need areas. In addition, practitioners must maintain a communication style that supports exploration of the values, thoughts and feelings that lead to job loss and recidivism. The Reentry Employment Series provides practitioners with the knowledge, skills and abilities to assist justice involved adults as they explore the values, thoughts and feelings that lead to job loss and recidivism. The tasks to be performed under this cooperative agreement will include facilitation of training curriculum based on
Corrections News
Cooperative Agreement: Outcome and Performance Measures for Community Corrections
Posted: 2 weeks ago
Updated: Questions and Answers below The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is seeking applications for funding under the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017. The purpose of this solicitation is to develop a publication that will outline suggested outcome and performance measures and mission critical data for local and state community corrections operations. Goals and Objectives: This competitive solicitation will fund the development of a document for the community corrections field containing clearly defined and easily calculable measures that can be used to gauge progress in 1) achieving mission and strategic goals, 2) improving fidelity to program design, service delivery and outcomes, and 3) enhancing the ability to illustrate community corrections value in an evidence based criminal justice system. Objectives: 1. Identify current performance and outcome measurements, data managementstrategies and mission critical data utilized by the community corrections field forinclusi
Corrections News
Cooperative Agreement: Employment Retention Inventory Research Project
Posted: 2 weeks ago
The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is seeking applications for funding under the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017. Work under this cooperative agreement will involve the statistical analysis of the Employment Retention Inventory (ERI) to assign quantitative value to qualitative data specific to criminogenic risk levels. Overview: In 2010, the National Institute of Corrections entered into an 18-month cooperative agreement with Learning Designs, Inc. to develop a competency-based training curriculum to provide practitioners with the knowledge and skills needed specific to employment retention services for justice involved adults. In addition to the curriculum, an Employment Retention Inventory (ERI) was developed to identify precursors to job loss and/or recidivism while creating a process for connecting targeted populations to specialized services that address their risk for job loss and recidivism successfully with the understanding that programming should target justice involve
Corrections News
See Us There! NIC at AJA in Orlando
Posted: 3 weeks ago
Visit the NIC exhibit booth #212/214 and sponsored workshops at the American Jail Association Annual Conference Jail Expo in Orlando, Florida, April 9-12, 2017. Crisis Leadership - Cosponsored by NIC Speakers: Panda J. Adkins, National Institute of Corrections and Robert W. Weinhold, Jr., The Fallston Group Room: Grand 5-6, Time Slot: Mon 04/10/17 02:00 PM - 05:00 PM Crises cost time, money, customers and careers, and, in the worst of scenarios, lives. According to studies, 77% of crises are smoldering issues before they become an actual crisis. It is important to perform a crisis audit within your organization so that you minimize your reputational risk. This workshop explores the definition, anatomy, and early warning signs of crisis; the importance of organizational muscle memory; how to lead and what to communicate to enhance stakeholder trust and confidence; the nuances of crisis leadership, strategy, and communications; and the immediate steps to protect your people,
Corrections News
Cooperative Agreement: Dosage Probation White Paper
Posted: 4 weeks ago
The National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is seeking applications for funding under the Fiscal Year (FY) 2017. The goal of this cooperative agreement will be to highlight the Dosage Probation Model and to take the lessons learned, successes and challenges from the dosage test pilot sites with the field, and to develop and share an implementation model for jurisdictions. Goals, Objectives, and Deliverables: The goal of this cooperative agreement will be to share experiences from the dosage test pilot sites with the field; including successes, challenges, lessons learned, and also to develop and share an implementation model for jurisdictions considering the dosage model to use as a guide for implementation. The successful applicant will have intimate knowledge of the dosage probation concept and key research principles underlying the dosage model, along with familiarity with the dosage implementation strategies; including core activities, processes, and steps a jurisdiction woul
Corrections News
Apply for NIJ’s Solicitation: Research and Evaluation in Safety, Health, and Wellness in the Criminal Justice System
Posted: 4 weeks ago
Application deadline extended to May 8, 2017. The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ), Office of Justice Programs (OJP), National Institute of Justice (NIJ) is seeking applications for funding for research in three areas: (1) the impact of acute and chronic stress on (a) law enforcement and corrections officers and (b) individuals in violent communities; (2) the impact of parental incarceration on children; and (3) the efficacy of services, strategies, policies, and processes within the criminal or juvenile justice system that serve as responses to children exposed to violence. This program furthers the Department s mission by sponsoring research to provide objective, independent, evidence-based knowledge and tools to meet the challenges of crime and justice, particularly at the state and local levels. Full Solicitation: https://nij.gov/funding/Documents/solicitations/NIJ-2017-11481.pdf Applications Due: May 8, 2017 ---------------------------------------- March 3, 2017: A rec
Corrections News
New to the NIC Website: Technology in Corrections
Posted: 5 weeks ago
Recently added to the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) website is our new web page focusing on Technology in Corrections. In many ways technology has been a help and a hindrance for the corrections field. People working in the field struggle to decide how to handle these technologies...if at all. Technology consistently changes faster than corrections and/or society can keep up with it. Implementing a technology, or plans to battle it (take cell phones for instance), can be a long and difficult process, and before new technology can be implemented, things may have changed. This package page contains information about: computers the internet, apps, body cameras, bio-metrics facial recognition, cell phones, drones, electronic monitoring GPS, and x-rays scanners, in order to provide information on the biggest trends in technology for the corrections field. Example resources from the Technology in Corrections page: Visions of Law Enforcement Technology in the Period 20
Corrections News
In the News: Women Shortchanged by Justice Reforms
Posted: 5 weeks ago
This article summarizes a recent report from the Prisoner Reentry Institute of John Jay College of Criminal Justice on gender and criminal justice reform. The report, Women In Justice: Gender and the Pathway to Jail, argues that reforms must be gender-responsive, faithful to the principles of parsimony and proportionality, and engage social services to better serve individuals with criminal justice involvement. Highlights from the report: The number of women in the American justice system has grown exponentially, by more than 700%, from 1980 to 2014. Women of color in particular are disproportionately arrested and incarcerated. The New York City data (from Rikers Island) shows that women are charged with less serious crimes, are less likely to be charged with violent crimes, and are less likely to return to jail within one year. Recommended guiding principles of reform: Interventions to address the needs of justice-involved women in New York City must be gender-respons
Older News
Training
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Upcoming training, broadcasts, and e-learning opportunities.
Training Opportunity
National Sheriffs' Institute
Register Before: July 02, 2017
(Begins September 18, 2017) The National Sheriffs' Institute (NSI), sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) and the National Sheriffs' Association (NSA), is designed to enhance your leadership skills as you take on the challenges of your first term as sheriff. It is the only executive leadership program designed specifically for first-term sheriffs. It was first developed and delivered in the early 1970s and has changed over the years to meet the evolving needs of first-term sheriffs. The program is held in Aurora, Colorado.
Training Opportunity
Managing Restrictive Housing Populations
Register Before: July 01, 2017
(Begins September 11, 2017) This 4-day training program focuses on the management of inmates in Restrictive Housing within the control and jurisdiction of departments of corrections throughout the country. 
Training Opportunity
Conducting Security Audits
Register Before: June 30, 2017
(Begins September 11, 2017) With NIC’s hands-on, onsite training, gain the experience of auditing out-of-state institutions of various security levels and missions. This 36-hour training program supplements classroom instruction in auditing protocol with tours of assigned facilities and real-world assignments that put newly trained participants in charge of the auditing process.
Training Opportunity
Executive Training for New Wardens
Register Before: June 26, 2017
(Begins August 28, 2017) The position of warden is one of the most daunting, yet rewarding, opportunities a corrections professional can achieve. Yet, the internal and external expectations and accountability that accompany this position can affect a warden’s leadership ability and management of facility operations. These challenges require the development of new skills and knowledge. This 36-hour program helps participants enhance their skills in areas essential to effective leadership and administration of a correctional institution. Some of the topics to be discussed include institutional culture, central office relationships, budget management strategies, decision making, and media relations. Woven throughout the program are continuous opportunities to share concerns and exchange and create new ideas. Eligibility Requirements: Wardens with less than 18 months' experience are encouraged to apply.
Training Opportunity
Orientation for New Pretrial Executives
Register Before: June 15, 2017
(Begins August 07, 2017) Extensive training that enhances the effectiveness of pretrial executives in maintaining and capitalizing existing services.
Training Opportunity
Direct Supervision T4T
Register Before: May 19, 2017
(Begins July 31, 2017) This training consists of two recently developed programs by the National Institute of Corrections’ Jails Division: • Making Direct Supervision Work: The Role of the Housing-Unit Officer • Making Direct Supervision Work: The Role of the First-Line Supervisor The programs are designed for agencies planning to move from a traditional jail into a new direct supervision jail. However, they also can be used to train new and veteran staff in direct supervision jails currently operating under the direct supervision philosophy.
Training Opportunity
Jail Public Information Officers’ Network Overview
Register Before: May 15, 2017
(Begins June 07, 2017) Public Information Officers (PIO) play a vital role in local jails. The public’s perception/misperception of jail operations can influence public safety, funding, elections and numerous other factors. Responding to media inquiries regarding crisis situations is just one of the many roles of the PIO. Building a positive rapport with the media, taking control of your message, and conveying your mission are priority tasks for a PIO.
Training Opportunity
Learning and Performance Symposium
Register Before: May 15, 2017
(Begins August 08, 2017) The National Institute of Corrections has been a center of corrections learning for 40 years. The Academy Division invites you to be a part of visioning the next forty years and the role of leadership, innovation and collaboration in our future success! During this interactive session, we will bring together Learning and Performance professionals to address the most pressing issues facing corrections learning today including: • Ensuring learning and performance competency development • Continuing professional development of learning and performance professionals • Leveraging technology for learning in corrections • Facilitating Collaborative efforts for collective goals • Applying research to corrections learning and performance.
Training Opportunity
Gender Responsive Discipline and Sanctions: Planning for Policy Improvement
Register Before: May 12, 2017
(Begins July 11, 2017) This curriculum is based on content from the Gender Responsive Discipline and Sanctions Policy Guide for Women’s Facilities and will walk participants through a process for developing an implementation plan to make changes in discipline policies and practices. Immediate outcomes from participating in this workshop are anticipated to include the development of discipline policies and practices that better respond to the specific needs of women in state and local correctional facilities. Longer term outcomes may include: reduced inmate violations, positive changes in inmate behavior, safer and more productive correctional environments for staff and inmates, increased stability and successful reintegration of women from prison to the community.
Training Opportunity
Mental Health First Aid
Register Before: May 08, 2017
(Begins June 20, 2017) Mental Health First Aid is an 8-hour, one day course that teaches individuals how to help someone who is developing a mental health problem or experiencing a mental health crisis.
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