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  • Gender-Responsive Program Assessment Tool

    Gender-Responsive Program Assessment Tool Cover
    Gender-Responsive Program Assessment Tool

    “The Gender-Responsive Program Assessment tool is an instrument by which program administrators, program evaluators, agency monitors and staff can evaluate the gender responsiveness of programs for women and girls and obtain feedback that can be used to improve the quality of a program’s services” (p. 1). This tool allows one to evaluate these program elements: theoretical foundation and mission statement; site and facility; administration and staffing; program environment and culture; treatment planning; program development; and program assessment.

    Document
  • Culture and Change Management: Using APEX to Facilitate Organizational Change

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    Culture and Change Management: Using APEX to Facilitate Organizational Change

    “Culture, including beliefs, assumptions, values, norms, and practices in an organization, determines the success of an organization’s performance and change efforts. This book helps illuminate the role culture plays in an organization that is striving for higher performance ... Knowledge of culture enables an organization to proceed along the path to successful change. The APEX Change Management Model provides a process and map for organizational change based in research and best practices; it engages the human component of the organization to ensure success” (p. 85). Eight chapters follow an introduction to Achieving Performance Excellence (APEX): introduction; organizational culture and change; introduction to change management; APEX Change Management Model; additional elements of successful change management; communications planning during change; change management principles and practices in action—Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA); and changing culture during challenging times.

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  • The Effects of Solitary Confinement: Commentary on One Year Longitudinal Study of the Psychological Effects of Administrative Segregation

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    The Effects of Solitary Confinement: Commentary on One Year Longitudinal Study of the Psychological Effects of Administrative Segregation

    The author comments on research done by the Colorado Department of Corrections and the University of Colorado’s Department of Psychology concerning the effects of solitary confinement. Sections of this article include: the Colorado study; why available research was not used the authors of the Colorado study; available European studies on the effects of solitary confinement; social contact and contamination across groups; whether the study participants were harmed by solitary confinement prior to the study; how the self-reported data was obtained; crisis events, hospitalization, and objective data; and conclusion. Since the research by Colorado was severely flawed, “[i]t is therefore extremely difficult to gain any valuable information about the effects of AS [administrative segregation] and solitary confinement from the Colorado study” (p. 9).

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  • Making Restitution Real: Five Case Studies on Improving Restitution Collection

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    Making Restitution Real: Five Case Studies on Improving Restitution Collection

    Lessons learned in the collection of restitution by five programs are explained. “From statewide, multi-year initiatives to vigorous local programs, it is [the authors’] hope that these examples will inspire advocates and officials around the country to reexamine their own policies and programs and renew their commitment to improving the lives of crime victims through the collection of restitution” (p. 5). Papers contained in this document are: “Michigan’s Trial Court Collections Project: Collection of Court-ordered Fines, Fees, Costs, and Victim Restitution” by Elizabeth A. Barber; “The Vermont Model: A Victim-Centered Approach to Restitution” by Judy Rex and Elaine Boyce; “Restitution Enforcement Court Superior Court Maricopa County: A Practical Approach to Assure Restitution to Victims” by Roland J. Steinle, III; “Project Payback: A Juvenile Restitution Program” by Gretchen Howard; and “California’s Enhanced Collections Unit, Judicial Council of California, Administrative Office of the Courts” by Jessica Sanora. The three most common elements for effective restitution collection are leadership, commitment to change, and openness to new thinking.

    Document
  • The Impact of Shift Length in Policing on Performance, Health, Quality of Life, Sleep, Fatigue, and Extra-Duty Employment

    The Impact of Shift Length in Policing on Performance, Health, Quality of Life, Sleep, Fatigue, and Extra-Duty Employment Cover
    The Impact of Shift Length in Policing on Performance, Health, Quality of Life, Sleep, Fatigue, and Extra-Duty Employment

    “Because there are significant policy implications associated with compressed workweeks in law enforcement, there is a great need for an examination of both current national practices with regard to CWWs [compressed workweeks] in law enforcement, as well as the impact of such schedules on performance and safety, health, quality of life, sleep, fatigue, and extra-duty employment (i.e., overtime and off-duty work). In this report, we aim to address this gap by providing both the results of the first comprehensive, randomized experiment of the effects of shift length in policing, as well as descriptive data on current shift practices and trends” (Executive Summary p. 2). Findings reveal that there are no significant differences between 8-, 10-, and 12-hour shifts in regards to work performance, health, or family-work conflict. Those working 10-shifts did comment that they got more sleep and felt they had a better quality of work life than with an 8-hour shift. Those working 12-hours reported more sleepiness and less alertness than working 8-hours. The 10-hour shift appears to be the best option for agencies wanting to go to a CWW.

    Document
  • Understanding Corrections through the APEX Lens

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    Understanding Corrections through the APEX Lens

    This guidebook “is the second book in the APEX Guidebook series and is designed to help correctional practitioners deepen their knowledge of the Public Safety Model domains. It offers practical suggestions for improving performance and creating positive change by sharing best-practice methods and current literature on higher performance in corrections” (p. ix). APEX itself provides strategies for achieving performance excellence in the Public Safety Model domains—operations (which includes safe and secure supervision and settings and process management), stakeholder focus, workforce focus, strategic planning, measurement/analysis/knowledge management, and results. Eight chapters follow an introduction to Achieving Performance Excellence (APEX): introduction; operations focus—safe and secure supervision and settings; operations focus—process management; stakeholder focus; workforce focus; strategic planning; measurement, analysis, and knowledge management; and results.

    Document
  • Environmental Scan 2011

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    Environmental Scan 2011

    “Beginning in the late 1990’s, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) Information Center began scanning social, economic and corrections issues to inform the development of programs and services offered by NIC. This report, now in its 6th edition, has continued to evolve into a popular tool that is also used by corrections practitioners to inform their work in jails, prisons and community corrections. Since there are many issues beyond what is addressed in this environmental scan that potentially will influence corrections, this report is intended to give a broad overview of selected current and anticipated trends and not intended to be comprehensive” (p. 3). Sections of this report are: introduction; international developments; demographic and social trends; the workforce; technology; public opinion; the economy and government spending; criminal justice trends; corrections populations and trends; and corrections program initiative and reentry.

    Document
  • Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting Aurora, Colorado September 21-23, 2009

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    Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting Aurora, Colorado September 21-23, 2009

    Sections contained in these proceedings include: about this Large Jail Network (LJN) meeting; PREA (Prison Rape Elimination Act) overview; Successful pre-trial release and criminal justice system collaborations; national legislation and policy update; ADA, CRIPA, and LEP (Americans with Disabilities Act, Civil Rights if Institutionalized Persons Act, and limited-English-speaking persons); middle management training programs for jail professionals; social media in jails; open forum; and LJN business.

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  • Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting Aurora, Colorado March 28-30, 2010

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    Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting Aurora, Colorado March 28-30, 2010

    Sections contained in these proceedings include: about this Large Jail Network (LJN) meeting; meeting take-aways in brief; coping skills with and for staff in fiscally tight times; the trend of medical issues in the future; creating a culture of leadership; creative efficiencies in the booking area; R.I.S.E. (ccc) program; legal update; open forum; legislation update, ACA Core Standards, American Correctional Association and American Jail Association news; and LJN business.

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  • Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting Aurora, Colorado September 13-15, 2010

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    Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting Aurora, Colorado September 13-15, 2010

    Sections contained in these proceedings include: about this Large Jail Network (LJN) meeting; meeting take-aways in brief; core jail standards overview; accountability and leadership; accountability and leadership; battling complacency in line staff and first-level supervisors; managing staff medical leave; American Correctional Association and American Jail Association news and legislative update; addressing staff/inmate fraternization; substance abuse and self awareness; open forum; announcements; and LJN business.

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  • Study of Incarcerated Women and Their Children

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    Study of Incarcerated Women and Their Children

    The experiences of female inmates, their children, and the present caregivers of those children are examined. Any review of the problems women inmates and their children experience should include this report. Three sections are contained in this document: female prisoners—demographics, criminal histories, family histories, mental health histories, drug abuse histories, children, and concerns and recommendations from the women; caregivers of the children of female prisoners—backgrounds of the incarcerated mothers and the children, experiences of the children at the time of arrest, problems experiences by the children, contact between child and mother, and problems experienced by caregivers; and summary and recommendations.

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  • Motivational Interviewing in Corrections: A Comprehensive Guide to Implementing MI in Corrections

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    Motivational Interviewing in Corrections: A Comprehensive Guide to Implementing MI in Corrections

    This guide explains how to implement motivational interviewing (MI) in correctional settings. Motivational Interviewing is a counseling technique that enables people to get beyond their reluctance to change problem behaviors. MI is directive (focused on goals), client-centered, and non-confrontational. The first four chapters of this guide “address background and fundamental issues related to agency or systemwide implementation of MI … [while the last two chapters] address agency issues, such as organizational norms, mental models, and leadership styles that can significantly affect the success of MI implementation” (p. 5). These chapters are: what MI is; how MI is learned; supervising and coaching to support implementation; assessing motivational interviewing skills; and planning to help individuals develop MI skills in a correctional setting. A glossary is also included.

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  • National Institute of Corrections Report to the Nation FY 2011

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    National Institute of Corrections Report to the Nation FY 2011

    “It is with great pleasure that I present to you the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) Report to the Nation for fiscal year 2011. This last year has been very important for us because it has included a number of accomplishments that have enabled us to continue to assist the field of corrections effectively … One of our greatest achievements continues to be our ability to provide quality services to the field with a relatively small federal budget and staff … There are many items that I am pleased to highlight in this report, including the relocation of the Robert J. Kutak library and National Corrections Academy to a new, renovated facility in Aurora, Colorado; the improvements NIC has made to enhance its communications; and the continued technical assistance that NIC provides to federal, state, local, and tribal jurisdictions as part of its core services. In the pages of this report, you will find information about these accomplishments while also learning more about our plans for the future.” These remarks were made by Morris L. Thigpen, Director, National Institute of Corrections (NIC). Topics reported upon include NIC’s reaching out to the field of corrections, supporting corrections in the field, training of corrections leaders for the future, continuing to supply the field with information resources, and the provision of technical assistance.

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  • Implementation of a Contingency Management-Based Intervention in a Community Supervision Setting: Clinical Issues and Recommendations

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    Implementation of a Contingency Management-Based Intervention in a Community Supervision Setting: Clinical Issues and Recommendations

    The contingency management component of a cognitively-behaviorally based substance abuse treatment program in a probation setting is examined. Individuals looking to set up a similar treatment program will find this article very informative. The program is called "Supporting Offenders to Avoid Recidivism and Initiate New Goals (SOARING)". Sections following an abstract include: contingency management (CM) overview; CM intervention settings; CM intervention in substance use treatment; CM in criminal justice settings; a test of CM in community supervision; discussion about target behaviors (or goals) and related issues, contingency issues, and urinalysis issues; and implications.

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  • The Role of Program Design, Implementation, and Evaluation in Evidence-Based “Real World” Community Supervision

    The Role of Program Design, Implementation, and Evaluation in Evidence-Based 'Real World' Community Supervision Color
    The Role of Program Design, Implementation, and Evaluation in Evidence-Based “Real World” Community Supervision

    The use of Strategy in Training Initiative in Community Supervision (STICS), a comprehensive model for community supervision, is discussed. Those individuals involved with community corrections and its increased effectiveness should read this article. It will explain how to transfer evidence-based practice into “real world” community supervision. Topics covered include: the emergence of the Risk-Need-Responsivity (RNR) model; the Strategic Training Initiative in Community Supervision—program design, implementation, and evaluation issues; and steps to bringing “what works” to the real world.

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  • Reducing Recidivism: Corrections Directors in Five States Share Lessons Learned

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    Reducing Recidivism: Corrections Directors in Five States Share Lessons Learned

    The responses of Harold W. Clarke, Justin Jones, Andrew A. Pallito, LaDonna H. Thompson, and Max Williams - the corrections directors from Virginia, Oklahoma, Vermont, Kentucky, and Oregon, respectively - regarding strategies and challenges they faced in reducing recidivism are reported. Other agencies can use these lessons learned to reduce their own recidivism. Topics discussed include: why corrections leaders are embracing recidivism reduction as a goal; where recidivism reduction fits with other goals; the potential for reasonable reductions in the recidivism rate when faced with decreasing resources for field supervision and post-release services; the degree to which the legislature expects corrections administrators to drive efforts in reducing statewide recidivism; the most important policy steps that states can take to reduce recidivism; the data needed to track progress in reducing recidivism and that data’s availability; and the appropriate role the federal government should take in supporting the reduction of recidivism at the state level.

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  • State Sentencing and Corrections Legislation

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    State Sentencing and Corrections Legislation

    This database of significant sentencing and corrections legislation recently enacted by states can be searched by state, topic, keyword, year, or primary sponsor. Legislative topics include: budget and oversight; community supervision administration; community supervision programs; correctional facility administration; diversion and sentencing alternatives; inmate programs; reentry barriers and access to services; reentry oversight and organization; reentry programs and supervision; release and discharge; sentencing and crime penalties; specialized populations; and treatment-based programs.

    Web Page
  • Avoiding Inmate Setups

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    Avoiding Inmate Setups

    This is an in-depth interview with an expert at manipulating jail and prison staff. The candidness of the inmate makes this presentation very educational. Some of his observations include the following:

    • “If I can manipulate you into making my time easier, I’m gonna do it. That’s my job in here.”
    • “You might get a little money, but you’ll get caught.”
    • "Once he’s done with you, he’ll sell you out to another inmate or the authorities."
    • “It can’t happen if you don’t allow it to…It’s always about that initial response.” The root of every setup is personal information. That’s power for the inmate.
    Video
  • APEX: Building the Model and Beginning the Journey

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    APEX: Building the Model and Beginning the Journey

    “Through extensive research and analysis, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is offering the field of corrections a comprehensive business model entitled the APEX (Achieving Performance Excellence) Initiative. The APEX Initiative is an agency-driven systems approach to building capacity for higher organizational performance, best practices, data-driven decisionmaking using multiple self-assessment tools, and a Guidebook series with strategies, interventions, and pathways. The APEX Public Safety Model presents a whole-systems view of a correctional agency” (p. v). You definitely want to put this on your must read soon list! Ten chapters follow an introduction to Achieving Performance Excellence (APEX): overview to APEX; APEX Leadership Domain; APEX Organizational Culture Domain; APEX Operations Focus Domain; APEX Stakeholder Domain; APEX Workforce Domain; APEX Strategic Planning Domain; APEX Measurement, Analysis, and Knowledge Management Domain; APEX Results Domain; and developing a 7-step communications plan.

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  • The Legal Rights of Young People in State Custody: What Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice Professionals Need to Know When Working with LGBT Youth

    The Legal Rights of Young People in State Custody: What Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice Professionals Need to Know When Working with LGBT Youth Cover
    The Legal Rights of Young People in State Custody: What Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice Professionals Need to Know When Working with LGBT Youth

    The legal rights of LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender) youth are discussed through the use of scenarios that show professionals in child welfare and juvenile justice what they may experience working with this population. This paper is divided into four parts: the Constitutional right to safety-- in foster care and juvenile detention and correctional facilities; other constitutional rights—the right to equal protection, and First Amendment rights; state non-discrimination laws; and conclusion. “Agencies and facilities that provide care to youth in state custody must educate themselves on the needs of LGBT youth and the scope of their civil rights” (p. 11).

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  • Identifying Core Competencies and Required Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (KSAs) for Jail Leaders: Methods and Outcomes

    Identifying Core Competencies and Required Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (KSAs) for Jail Leaders: Methods and Outcomes Cover
    Identifying Core Competencies and Required Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (KSAs) for Jail Leaders: Methods and Outcomes

    The process by which it was determined what knowledge, skills, and abilities jail leaders should have in order to be successful at their jobs is explained. Those 22 identified competencies are described in detail. Sections of this report include: introduction; overview of the literature review; Advisory Committee deliberations; subsequent refinements; focus group sessions at national conferences; drilling-down to the KSAs; methods; outcomes for the core competencies and related charts; and summary and conclusions. It should be noted that “that the individual components of KSAs are so interrelated that one cannot occur without the other” (p. 18).

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  • Is This a Good Quality Outcome Evaluation Report? A Guide for Practitioners

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    Is This a Good Quality Outcome Evaluation Report? A Guide for Practitioners

    “This guide is designed to introduce and explain the key concepts in outcome evaluation research in order to help practitioners distinguish between good and poor quality evaluation reports” (p. 3). Topics covered include: what evaluation is; the role of evaluation design; how well the evaluation is carried out; sample size appropriateness; definitions of evaluation terms; cost-benefit analysis; meta-analyses and systematic reviews; assessing the report’s quality; and “Is This a Good Quality Evaluation Report?” checklist.

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  • Report to Congress: Mandatory Minimum Penalties in the Federal Criminal Justice System

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    Report to Congress: Mandatory Minimum Penalties in the Federal Criminal Justice System

    “This report assesses the impact of mandatory minimum penalties on federal sentencing, particularly in light of the Supreme Court’s decision in “Booker v. United States”, which rendered the federal sentencing guidelines advisory” (p. xxv). Twelve chapters follow an executive summary: overview; history of mandatory minimum penalties and statutory relief mechanisms; the interaction between mandatory minimum penalties and the sentencing guidelines; changes in the federal criminal justice system, mandatory minimum penalties, and the federal prison populations; policy views about mandatory minimum penalties; the use of mandatory minimum penalties in 13 selected districts; statistical overview of mandatory minimum penalties; mandatory minimum penalties for drug offenses; mandatory minimum penalties for firearm offenses; mandatory minimum penalties for sex offenses; mandatory minimum penalties for identity theft offenses; and conclusions and recommendations. Of those individuals sentenced in federal courts during fiscal year 2010, 27.2% where convicted of a crime associated with a mandatory minimum penalty, with 77.4% of these being for drug trafficking offenses.

    Mixed Media
  • Return on Investment: Evidence-Based Options to Improve Statewide Outcomes--July 2011 Update

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    Return on Investment: Evidence-Based Options to Improve Statewide Outcomes--July 2011 Update

    An overview is presented of findings (as of July 2011) regarding “a comprehensive list of programs and policies that improve … outcomes for children and adults in Washington and result in more cost-efficient use of public resources” (p. 1). Sections comprising this report are: summary; background; the four-step research approach that assesses what works, calculates costs and benefits and ranks options, measures the risks associated with the analysis, and estimates the impact of various option combinations on statewide outcomes. Also included are two Technical Appendixes that provide in-depth results.

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  • Essential Skills for New Supervisors

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    Essential Skills for New Supervisors

    Making the transition from line staff to supervisor calls for developing new skills and competencies as well as a major shift in mindset from doing one’s own work to supervising the work of others.

    This program focuses on core competencies for supervisors. These competencies include developing personal and professional goals, demonstrating leadership, solving problems, thinking critically, making decisions, managing conflict, coaching, counseling, providing discipline, and encouraging staff performance. The DVD package includes:

    DVD 1: Group Edition (36-hour training program)
    This disc is for facilitators wishing to lead a group through this program and contains videos, a facilitator guide, a participant guide, presentation slides, and supplemental material.

    DVD 2: Self-Directed Edition (3-hour program)
    This disc is for individuals wishing to go through this program independently. No instructor or group experiences are required for this edition.

    Webinar
  • Florida Mortality Study: Florida Law Enforcement and Corrections Officers compared to Florida General Population

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    Florida Mortality Study: Florida Law Enforcement and Corrections Officers compared to Florida General Population

    This study was conducted to determine if there is a difference in lifespan between law enforcement and correctional officers and the general public. Sections following an executive summary include: introduction; research parameters; Florida general population; Florida Division of Retirement (FRS) Special Risk Class (Law Enforcement and Corrections); population comparison; and conclusion. On average, law enforcement and correctional officers died 12 years earlier than the general population. In other words, law enforcement and corrections officers lived 62.4 years compared to 74.2 years for the general population.

    Document
  • Motivational Interviewing (with a Criminal Justice Focus) Annotated Bibliography

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    Motivational Interviewing (with a Criminal Justice Focus) Annotated Bibliography

    Motivational Interviewing (MI) was introduced to the field of corrections in the 1990s through the Evidence-based Practices (EBP) Model as a method for enhancing intrinsic motivation. Since that time, agencies throughout the U.S., in all criminal justice settings, have—to a greater or lesser degree—explored if, when, and how to implement this approach to communicating, building rapport, and tapping into the internal motivation of the clients and staff members they work with. This annotated bibliography contains the written resources pertaining specifically to the criminal justice field. In addition, certain documents considered seminal to the training, implementation, evaluation, coaching, and quality assurance of MI skills are included.

    Document
  • Correctional Industries: A Working Solution [Satellite/Internet Broadcast]

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    Correctional Industries: A Working Solution [Satellite/Internet Broadcast]

    Correctional Industry programs contribute to the successful reentry of offenders by providing a structured environment for participants to learn the skills needed to obtain and retain post-release employment. Guided by evidence-based practices, Correctional Industries distinguishes itself by providing services that make an impact in reducing inmate recidivism. See how they make a significant difference in the lives of the offender population they serve and hear from national experts, correctional practitioners, and former offenders about the promising and evidenced-practices that impact recidivism.

    At the conclusion of this program broadcast on October 5, 2011, participants will be able to: describe the evolution of Correctional Industries from “producing quality products” to “developing individuals who produce quality products”; explain how the incorporation of evidence-based practices helps improve program outcomes; identify how Correctional Industries provides offenders with the skills they need to successfully obtain and retain post-release employment; and identify evidence-based training opportunities that promote professional growth and development.

    Video
  • The Six Moving Parts of Correctional Training Effectiveness

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    The Six Moving Parts of Correctional Training Effectiveness

    The "concept of 'The Six Moving Parts of Correctional Employee Training,' a model for integrating strategy into the organization's approach to training" is presented (p.1). Sections of this publication are: introduction; overview of the model's components; moving part 1 -- organizational readiness; moving part 2 -- curriculum selection; moving part 3 -- delivery methodology; moving part 4 -- participant engagement; moving part 5 -- workplace reinforcement; moving part 6 -- impact evaluation; summary; and political sidebar -- why correctional training is traditionally under-resourced.

    Document
  • Offender Employment Retention: Worth the Work [Satellite/Internet Broadcast]

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    Offender Employment Retention: Worth the Work [Satellite/Internet Broadcast]

    According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, more than 700,000 individuals are released from prisons yearly—with an additional 9 million adults cycling through local jails. Research indicates that employment is an important component of successful reentry, but most offender programs do not address the complex behavioral health issues that impact the offender’s ability to obtain and retain gainful employment while remaining crime free.

    Offender programming should target individuals at high risk for recidivism, address the dynamic influences that predict crime, and provide interventions specific to the needs of offenders. During this national discussion sponsored and broadcast by the National Institute of Corrections on November 2, 2011, participants will explore evidence-based practices that increase public safety while helping to reduce recidivism.

    At the conclusion of this broadcast, participants will be able to: define and describe an offender retention model; identify strategies, resources, and partnerships that improve retention outcomes; describe a process for developing effective offender services/programming; and identify collaborative partnerships that support increased public safety and effective reentry programs.

    Document
  • NPC Research Reports & Publications

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    NPC Research Reports & Publications

    “NPC Research provides quality social services evaluation, policy analysis, research, and training.” This website provides information, reports, and evaluations pertaining to a wide range of project areas. Specialty Areas include child abuse and its prevention, community health, criminal justice, drug treatment courts and other problem-solving courts, early childhood and family well-being, juvenile justice, literacy, substance abuse prevention and treatment, and youth development and strengths. Publications and resources include publications, report, presentations, related links, and materials. Materials are organized according to: Drug Court Typology Interview Guide; Healthy Start; Juvenile Crime Prevention Risk and Protective Assessment; NARA; Oregon Relief Nursery; Reading for Healthy Families; Regional Action Initiative; and Youth Competency Assessment.

    Web Page
  • National Institute of Corrections and DC Pretrial-Measuring What Matters-DC Public Safety

    National Institute of Corrections and DC Pretrial-Measuring What Matters-DC Public Safety

    This 30 minute program explores the National Institute of Corrections’ publication “Measuring What Matters: Outcome and Performance Measures for the Pretrial Services Field” (NIC accession no. 025172). This report provides guidance for making pretrial agencies more effective. Lori Eville and Spurgeon Kennedy are interviewed.

    Audio
  • Performance Based Measurement System: What Really Counts in Corrections! [Satellite/Internet Broadcast held September 14, 2011]

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    Performance Based Measurement System: What Really Counts in Corrections! [Satellite/Internet Broadcast held September 14, 2011]

    This program provides information about the nationwide automated Performance-Based Measures System (PBMS). PBMS is an accurate, consistent way to capture, record, report and share data between correctional agencies. It was created by the Association of State Correctional Administrators (ASCA). Participants will be able to:

    • Describe the scope and development of PBMS regarding how specific needs gave rise to PBMS solutions;
    • Describe the key components of PBMS;
    • Examine the benefits of using the PBMS during an Evidenced Based Practice decision making process;
    • And identify available resources that support implementation of PBM.
    Video
  • Special Challenges Facing Parole

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    Special Challenges Facing Parole

    This guide is designed to “lay out the context, summarize the key issues, highlight the recent research, and provide suggestions about where to find more extensive and detailed resources” about special populations parole boards may have contact with (p. xiii). Seven chapters are contained in this publication: sex offenders; offenders who have significant mental health concerns; offenders who have significant substance abuse problems; women offenders; aging or geriatric offenders; youthful/juvenile offenders in the adult correctional system; and the challenges of housing for offenders released from prison.

    Document
  • Prison Classification Series

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    Prison Classification Series

    This is a collection of material about prison classification. Use the link on the right to download the following titles:

    • Classification of High-Risk and Special Management Prisoners: A National Assessment of Current Practices
    • Classification of Women Offenders: A National Assessment of Current Practices
    • Developing Gender-Specific Classification for Women Offenders
    • Enhancing Prison Classification Systems: The Emerging Role of Management Information Systems
    • Internal Prison Classification Systems: Case Studies in Their Development and Implementation
    • Objective Prison Classification: A Guide for Correctional Agencies
    • Prison Intake Systems: Assessing Needs and Classifying Prisoners
    • Revalidating External Prison Classification Systems: The Experience of Ten States and Model for Classification Reform
    • Critical Issues and Developments in Prison Classification
    • Findings in Prison Classification and Risk Assessment
    Document
  • Training Design and Development

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    Training Design and Development

    This program explains the systematic design of training based upon the Instructional Theory Into Practice (ITIP) model. The program was developed under a cooperative agreement with the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention for the juvenile system audience. The following modules are contained in this manual:

    • Training program overview;
    • Learner centered instruction;
    • Assessment;
    • Performance objectives;
    • ITIP model for instructional design;
    • Instructional strategies;
    • Evaluation;
    • Designing training aids;
    • Developing a training design;
    • And presenting a training design.
    Document
  • Workplace Learning Annotated Bibliography

    Workplace Learning Annotated Bibliography Cover
    Workplace Learning Annotated Bibliography

    The use of workplace learning in “building your organization into a dynamic and flexible one, capable of meeting contemporary challenges” is addressed (p. 2). These annotated citations are grouped according to what workplace learning is, its importance, how to implement it, and how workplace learning has been implemented.

    Document
  • Context and Impact of Organizational Changes in State Corrections Agencies: A Study of Local Discourses and Practices in Kansas and Michigan

    Context and Impact of Organizational Changes in State Corrections Agencies: A Study of Local Discourses and Practices in Kansas and Michigan Cover
    Context and Impact of Organizational Changes in State Corrections Agencies: A Study of Local Discourses and Practices in Kansas and Michigan

    The impact of external and internal forces on “corrections policy innovation in which measures to control prison populations and enhance service delivery were implemented despite challenging institutional and social environments” is examined (p. 2). This is good reading for those agencies looking to implement their own strategies for correctional system reform. This report contains these sections: introduction; the context and dynamics of corrections reform—expanding capacity (1980 to early 1990s), addressing prison growth (early 1990-2005), and implementing broader correctional reforms (2006 to the present); context and design of the Kansas Offender Risk Reduction and Reentry Program (KOR3P) and Michigan Prisoner Reentry Initiative (MPRI); documenting organizational change—domains of change within the DOC and beyond and similarities and differences in design and implementation of the reforms; emerging challenges and constraints; and conclusion and recommendations.

    Document
  • Motivational Interviewing for Incarcerated Adolescents: Effects of Depressive Symptoms on Reducing Alcohol and Marijuana Use After Release

    Motivational Interviewing for Incarcerated Adolescents: Effects of Depressive Symptoms on Reducing Alcohol and Marijuana Use After Release Cover
    Motivational Interviewing for Incarcerated Adolescents: Effects of Depressive Symptoms on Reducing Alcohol and Marijuana Use After Release

    “This study evaluates the efficacy of MI [motivational interviewing] versus RT [relaxation training] in reducing substance use outcomes for incarcerated adolescents and examines the role of depressive symptoms in moderating outcomes.” While MI is shown to be effective in reducing the use of alcohol in adolescents with low and high levels of depression and marijuana use in individuals with low levels of depression, it appears RT is better suited to marijuana-involved adolescents with high depressive symptoms.

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  • A Model for Social Justice: Collaboration Between Faith-Based and Community Organizations and Corrections: Highlights

    A Model for Social Justice: Collaboration Between Faith-Based and Community Organizations and Corrections: Highlights Cover
    A Model for Social Justice: Collaboration Between Faith-Based and Community Organizations and Corrections: Highlights

    Highlights are provided of advice given by individuals from correctional agencies and faith-based and community organizations on how to create successful partnerships. Sections of this presentation are: understanding each other—questions and concerns; making partnerships work; legal issues; and getting started.

    Video
  • Environmental Scan 2010

    Environmental Scan 2010 cover
    Environmental Scan 2010

    "Beginning in the late 1990’s, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) Information Center began scanning social, economic and corrections issues to inform the development of programs and services offered by NIC. This report, now in its 5th edition, has continued to evolve into a popular tool that is also used by corrections practitioners to inform their work in jails, prisons and community corrections. Since there are many issues beyond what is addressed in this environmental scan that potentially will influence corrections, this report is intended to give a broad overview of selected current and anticipated trends and not intended to be comprehensive" (p. 3). Topics covered include: international developments, demographic and social trends, the workforce, technology, public opinion, the economy and government spending, criminal justice trends, and corrections populations and trends.

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  • Implementing Evidence-Based Principles in Community Corrections: A Case Study of Successes and Challenges in Maine

    Implementing Evidence-Based Principles in Community Corrections: A Case Study of Successes and Challenges in Maine Cover
    Implementing Evidence-Based Principles in Community Corrections: A Case Study of Successes and Challenges in Maine

    The integration of evidence-based principles, organizational development, and collaboration is investigated. Sections of this report are: introduction; background; literature review; methodology; document review; key informant interviews; interviews with probation officers (observations of current climate); quantitative analysis of intermediate measures; and findings. “The research on evidence-based principles in Maine … suggests that this concurrent model may not be a realistic strategy given its insistence on an integrated focus on evidence-based principles, organizational development, and collaboration” (p. 30).

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  • Offender Workforce Development Services Makes an Impact

    Offender Workforce Development Services Makes an Impact Cover
    Offender Workforce Development Services Makes an Impact

    Results from an ongoing evaluation project on the effectiveness of offender workforce development (OWD) services are presented. “Drug and alcohol abuse and/or not continuing substance abuse treatment was identified as almost a universal barrier to post-release success” (p. 67). Those individuals that receive OWD services have a recidivism rate 33% lower than the comparison group.

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  • Reduce Costs, Lower Risks, Enhance Healthcare Services: The Promise of Effective Pharmaceutical Management [Satellite/Internet Broadcast]

    Reduce Costs, Lower Risks, Enhance Healthcare Services: The Promise of Effective Pharmaceutical Management Cover
    Reduce Costs, Lower Risks, Enhance Healthcare Services: The Promise of Effective Pharmaceutical Management [Satellite/Internet Broadcast]

    As jurisdictions across the nation attempt to do more with less, the effects of pharmacy management today will have long lasting and costly effects on the broader health care outcomes of tomorrow, in particular, the effectiveness of treatments for inmates with chronic illnesses, infectious diseases and comorbidities. This program will provide clarity around pharmacy management, why it is important to all jurisdictions, and methods for improving existing operations. This 3-hour program broadcast on April 6, 2011 addresses the costs and issues surrounding correctional pharmacy management. After watching this program, participants will: develop new insights regarding current practices for prescribing medications in correctional facilities and the need to manage that process; gain a deeper understanding of the principles, practices, and guidelines of a well-designed formulary management system; acquire a new appreciation for the current evidence and data used to guide formulary decisions; understand best practices related to the delivery of pharmaceuticals and biological medicines; have the skills to improve the coordination of care for offenders between correctional and non-correctional systems; and be able to explore the trends and foreseeable challenges to correctional pharmaceutical management in the future. The broadcast will also help viewers find answers to the following questions: What is a formulary and why is this concept important to my agency? What are the benefits of an effective correctional pharmacy management system? How does a pharmacy management system reduce costs and liability while enhancing healthcare services? What does the evidence tell us? Is there value in collaborating for the purchase of pharmaceuticals and biologicals? How does pharmacy management affect offender reentry?

    Video
  • Desktop Guide for Tribal Probation Personnel: The Screening and Assessment Process

    Desktop Guide for Tribal Probation Personnel: The Screening and Assessment Process Cover
    Desktop Guide for Tribal Probation Personnel: The Screening and Assessment Process

    "This guide is intended to provide tribal probation personnel with information on how the screening and assessment process can facilitate and promote offender accountability and long-term behavior change" (p. 2). Sections comprising this publication are: community corrections in context; the screening and assessment process; benefits of screening and assessment tools; choosing a tool; challenges to using assessment instruments; using screening and assessment results; and conclusion. Appendixes describe various screening and assessment tools and domestic violence assessment tools.

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  • Measuring What Matters: Outcome and Performance Measures for the Pretrial Services Field

    Measuring What Matters: Outcome and Performance Measures for the Pretrial Services Field Cover
    Measuring What Matters: Outcome and Performance Measures for the Pretrial Services Field

    “This monograph presents recommended outcome and performance measures and mission-critical data … [that] will enable pretrial service agencies to gauge more accurately their programs’ effectiveness in meeting agency and justice system goals” (p. v). Sections of this publication include introduction, outcome measures, performance measures, mission-critical data, setting targets, and examples of pretrial release program measures.

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  • The Strategic Training Initiative in Community Supervision: Risk-Need-Responsivity in the Real World

    The Strategic Training Initiative in Community Supervision: Risk-Need-Responsivity in the Real World Cover
    The Strategic Training Initiative in Community Supervision: Risk-Need-Responsivity in the Real World

    The application of the risk-need-responsivity (RNR) model of offender rehabilitation to one-on-one supervision of offenders placed under probation is examined. This RNR-based training program is called the Strategic Training Initiative in Community Supervision (STICS). Sections of this report include: abstract; the RNR model of offender rehabilitation; the present study; method; results for the success of random assignment, length and content of session discussions, quality of probation officers’ skills and intervention techniques, recidivism, and clinical support; and discussion. “The results showed that the trained probation officers evidenced more of the RNR-based skills and that their clients had a lower recidivism rate” (p. ii).

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  • Executing the Will of the Voters?: A Roadmap To Mend or End the California Legislature’s Multi-Billion-Dollar Death Penalty Debacle

    Executing the Will of the Voters?: A Roadmap To Mend or End the California Legislature’s Multi-Billion-Dollar Death Penalty Debacle Cover
    Executing the Will of the Voters?: A Roadmap To Mend or End the California Legislature’s Multi-Billion-Dollar Death Penalty Debacle

    While this article looks at the death penalty in California, it gives other states good suggestions for dealing with problems in their own death penalty systems. Sections of this paper include: bulldozing barriers and unearthing hidden costs—how much California taxpayers are really paying for the State’s illusory death penalty; paved with good intentions—the legislative history of the death penalty in California; hazardous conditions ahead—potential state and federal constitutional issues arising out of California’s current death penalty scheme; the road not taken—“Remedies” revisited; roadmap for reform; and conclusion. “It is the authors’ view that unless California voters want to tolerate the continued waste of billions of tax dollars on the state’s now-defunct death penalty system, they must either demand meaningful reforms to ensure that the system is administered in a fair and effective manner or, if they do not want to be taxed to fund the needed reforms, they must recognize that the only alternative is to abolish the death penalty and replace it with a sentence of life imprisonment without the possibility of parole” (p. S41).

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  • National Institute of Corrections Report to the Nation FY 2010

    2010 report to the nation cover
    National Institute of Corrections Report to the Nation FY 2010

    The success of the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) in meeting the needs of its constituents during 2010 is reviewed. Sections of this document include: what NIC is; what the NIC Information Center is; how NIC helps meet the challenge of newly released offenders; what NIC does in your district; how NIC addresses the needs of elected officials and corrections executives who work with inmates and offenders; how NIC is involved in evidence-based practices; and how NIC addresses other contemporary issues in corrections.

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  • Motivational Interviewing Training In Criminal Justice: Development of a Model Plan

    Motivational Interviewing Training In Criminal Justice: Development of a Model Plan Cover
    Motivational Interviewing Training In Criminal Justice: Development of a Model Plan

    The utilization of motivational interviewing (MI) by probation officers is explained. MI “is a communication style that involves strategic use of questions and statements to help clients find their own reasons for change” (p. 61). Topics discussed include: evidence-based practice; role of the probation officer; MI in criminal justice; the eight stages of learning motivational interviewing; MI training—a model plan; and future directions.

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