Back to top

All Library Items

  • The Future of Parole as a Key Partner in Assuring Public Safety

    The Future of Parole as a Key Partner in Assuring Public Safety Cover
    The Future of Parole as a Key Partner in Assuring Public Safety

    “This paper provides suggestions and examples about how these key decisionmaking functions of parole [which offenders participate in which programs, when, and for how long] can be shaped to target resources effectively according to the principles of risk, need, and responsivity” (p. viii). Sections of this publication include: introduction; historical context; the cusp of change; parole at the crossroads; resources to support parole’s new role; targets of excellence in paroling authority decisionmaking; specific steps paroling authorities can take to enhance their ability to provide “targeting”; policy-driven parole decisionmaking—individual and team excellence; and conclusion.

    Document
  • Paroling Authorities’ Strategic Planning and Management for Results

    Paroling Authorities’ Strategic Planning and Management for Results Cover
    Paroling Authorities’ Strategic Planning and Management for Results

    Individuals involved in making sure their parole agency’s goals are being met need to read this paper. It provides guidance for a paroling authority in “defining its vision and mission, assembling information and resources to accomplish its goals, and putting into place appropriate management and performance measurement systems to carry out its objectives and measure its progress” (p. v). Six chapters are contained in this publication: craft your vision and mission statements; assess your organization’s current operating practices; engage key partners; plan and take strategic action; review information and manage for results; and conclusion.

    Document
  • Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting Aurora, Colorado March 20-22, 2011

    LJN 2011 Cover
    Proceedings of the Large Jail Network Meeting Aurora, Colorado March 20-22, 2011

    Sections contained in these proceedings include: about this Large Jail Network (LJN) meeting; meeting highlights; Legal Issues in Jails – 2011 by William C. Collins; Jail Suicide Prevention Workshop with Lindsay Hayes; Effectively Using Data with Policy Makers by Michael Jones; Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Update and Toolkit—A Glance at LJN and PREA by Andie Moss and Recap of Attorney General Meeting on PREA Standards by Mitch Lucas; Leadership Toolkit by Mike Jackson; Association Updates and Legislative Updates by Kathy Black-Dennis; Open Forum; and LJN business.

    Document
  • Assessing Local Pretrial Justice Functions: A Handbook for Providing Technical Assistance

    Assessing Local Pretrial Justice Functions: A Handbook for Providing Technical Assistance Cover
    Assessing Local Pretrial Justice Functions: A Handbook for Providing Technical Assistance

    This guide “presents a protocol designed to produce high-quality technical assistance for the front end of the criminal justice system—the pretrial justice stage” (p. iii). Sections contained in this publication are: basic obligations of a technical assistance (TA) provider; preparation for the site visit; conducting the site visit; people who should be interviewed and areas of inquiry; after the site visit; characteristics of effective technical assistance; and logistics of acting as a consulting technical assistance provider.

    Document
  • Thinking for a ChangeThinking for a Change: Integrated Cognitive Behavior Change Program Thinking for a Change 3.1: The Complete Facilitator Package

    Thinking for a Change Cover
    Thinking for a ChangeThinking for a Change: Integrated Cognitive Behavior Change Program Thinking for a Change 3.1: The Complete Facilitator Package

    The Thinking for a Change curriculum has been revised and as a result NIC is no longer making available copies of any previous versions of Thinking for a Change 3.1. 

    Thinking for a Change (T4C) is the innovative, evidence-based cognitive behavioral curriculum from the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) that has broadly influenced the correctional field and the way correctional facilitators work with offenders and inmates. The program can be delivered to correctional clients by facilitators who have been trained to do so. Studies have shown that, when implemented with integrity, it can reduce recidivism among offenders. Lessons comprising this manual are: introduction; social skill-active listening; social skill—asking questions; social skill-giving feedback; social skill-knowing your feelings; cognitive self-change—thinking controls our behavior; cognitive self-change step 1—pay attention to our thinking; cognitive self-change step 2—recognizing risk; cognitive self-change step 3—use new thinking; thinking check-in; social skill—understanding the feelings of others; social skill—making a complaint; social skill—apologizing; social skill—responding to anger; social skill—negotiating; introduction to problem solving; problem solving skill 1—stop and think; problem solving skill 2—state the problem; problem solving skill 3—set a goal and gather information; problem solving practice skills 1-3; problem solving skill 4—think of choices and consequences; problem solving skill 5—make a plan; problem solving skill 6—do and evaluate; problem solving application; next steps; cognitive self-change—aftercare skill practice; social skill—aftercare skill practice; and problem solving—aftercare skill practice.

    Course
  • The Greening of Corrections: Creating a Sustainable System

    The Greening of Corrections: Creating a Sustainable System cover
    The Greening of Corrections: Creating a Sustainable System

    What are viable strategies for cutting costs while protecting the public’s safety? Corrections can achieve some substantial cost savings in sustainability or greening strategies. This publication “provides correctional professionals with a framework to gain a general understanding of sustainability practices and principles and to identify examples of operations, programs, and management strategies for self-sustaining facilities” (p. ii). Sections of this publication include: introduction; greening of correctional facilities; completing the sustainable model—preparing and training inmates; correctional industries—creating sustainable products/services and a green workforce; green reentry programs; recommendations for greening prisons and jails; and conclusion—the sustainable correctional/detention facility of the future.

    Document
  • Jail Design Guide

    Jail Design Guide Cover
    Jail Design Guide

    This guide “discusses current correctional standards and architectural principles that are important to building a cost-efficient jail to meet a locality’s particular needs” (p. xix). It will be highly useful for anyone involved in the planning, design, and construction of a new jail. Chapters are divided into four parts - getting started, major design considerations, functional components, and special considerations – and include: introduction; predesign planning; site selection and design; image and appearance; classification and separation; surveillance and supervision; staffing impact; security perimeter; criminal justice interface; functional components and relationships; planning and designing to standards; expansion; master control; intake-release; general housing; special housing; health care; visiting areas; exercise areas; programs and services; inmate commissary; food service; laundry areas; administration and public areas; staff areas; storage areas; single versus multiple occupancy; renovating nonsecure buildings into jails; construction and project costs; and making a building work.

    Document
  • 65 Million “Need Not Apply”: The Case for Reforming Criminal Background Checks for Employment

    65 Million “Need Not Apply”: The Case for Reforming Criminal Background Checks for Employment Cover
    65 Million “Need Not Apply”: The Case for Reforming Criminal Background Checks for Employment

    The exclusion of individuals with criminal records from employment is examined. People working with soon to be released prisoners or ex-offenders should be aware of this issue. The ability to find gainful employment, one of the critical needs for successful reentry, will be critically impacted by the sometimes unnecessary checking of criminal histories. Six sections are contained in this report: introduction; shutting workers with criminal records out of the job market compromises the economy and public safety; overbroad hiring restrictions run afoul of federal laws regulating criminal background checks for employment; wave of lawsuits documents routine civil rights and consumer protection violations; Craigslist survey reveals flagrant abuses by the nation’s largest companies; and recommendations.

    Document
  • State of the Science of Pretrial Risk Assessment

    State of the Science of Pretrial Risk Assessment Cover
    State of the Science of Pretrial Risk Assessment

    “This publication is designed for a wide-ranging audience of criminal justice stakeholders who have questions about pretrial risk assessment and its value to the pretrial justice process” (p.3). Sections of this report are: introduction; setting the stage; critical issues related to pretrial release, detention, and risk assessment; challenges to implementing evidence-based risk assessment and threats to reliable administration; methodological challenges associated with prediction of risk; where to go next—recommendations for research and practice; and conclusion.

    Document
  • State of Recidivism: The Revolving Door of America’s Prisons

    State of Recidivism: The Revolving Door of America's Prisons Cover
    State of Recidivism: The Revolving Door of America’s Prisons

    Anyone concerned with keeping ex-offenders out of prison or jail, be they correctional professionals or concerned community members, should read this publication. “This report seeks to elevate the public discussion about recidivism, prompting policy makers and the public to dig more deeply into the factors that impact rates of return to prison, and into effective strategies for reducing them” (p. 1). Sections following an executive summary are: introduction—recidivism as a performance measure, overview of the study, and what a recidivism rate is; a closer look at recidivism rates—new figures show steady national recidivism rate, states vary widely, and how recidivism rates have changed; unpacking the numbers—how sentencing impacts recidivism rate, how community corrections policy impacts recidivism rate, and examples of how three states dealt with recidivism; and improving public safety and cutting correctional costs—strategies for successfully reducing recidivism, resources for developing effective reentry and supervision strategies, and a promising start.

    Document
  • Incident Review of Death of Correctional Officer Jayme Biendl, January 29, 2011

    Incident Review of Death of Correctional Officer Jayme Biendl, January 29, 2011 Cover
    Incident Review of Death of Correctional Officer Jayme Biendl, January 29, 2011

    Circumstances surrounding the untimely death of Correctional Officer Jayme Biendl at the hands of an inmate are the focus of this incident review. This report “identifies systems, policies, practices, protocol, and technology within MCC/WRS [Monroe Correctional Complex/Washington State Reformatory] which would reasonably have been connected to factors surrounding safety and security for staff and others within that compound” (p. 3). Sections following an executive summary are: pre-planning agenda; documents reviews; staff interviews; briefing and report out; team’s areas of critical review; findings and recommendations for sanitation, staff assaults, treatment/program—custody/control balance, communication and alarm, chemical agents, training enhancement, custody staffing, post orders, inmate movement/call-outs/passes, camera placement and visibility, inmate volunteers, industries and back complex inmate access for jobs/programs/movement, visibility/safety, security audit, current change process, classification review—Inmate Scherf, close custody designated, and staff accountability; and staff comments.

    Document
  • Evidence-Based Policy, Practice, and Decisionmaking: Implications for Paroling Authorities

    Evidence-Based Policy, Practice, and Decisionmaking: Implications for Paroling Authorities Cover
    Evidence-Based Policy, Practice, and Decisionmaking: Implications for Paroling Authorities

    New parole board members and parole executives should read this publication. It “examines information emerging from research on evidence-based practice and decisionmaking in parole and the implications of these findings for paroling authorities” (p. viii). Five chapters comprise this document: evidence-based policy, practice, and decisionmaking—what it is and why paroling authorities should be interested in it; significant research findings regarding risk reduction—implications for paroling authorities; reaching the full recidivism reduction potential—using a systemwide approach to evidence-based decisionmaking; evaluating the research—how much evidence in enough; and the benefits of an evidence-based approach and recommendations for action—why pursue an evidence-based approach.

    Document
  • ITIP Toolkit: A Guide for Working with Curriculum Developers

    I.T.I.P Toolkit Cover image
    ITIP Toolkit: A Guide for Working with Curriculum Developers

    This user-friendly tool kit is: grounded in research; follows and promotes the use of the ADDIE (Analyze, Design, Develop, Implement, and Evaluate) model and ITIP (Instructional Theory Into Practice) format; and provides “a mechanism for the user to work with curriculum designers to set expectations, then to review, evaluate and give feedback on the curriculum as it is being developed” (p. ii). This publication is divided into six parts: purpose of the tool kit and its components; ADDIE Instructional Design System; ITIP; thirteen tools; frequently asked questions (FAQs); and resources.

    Document
  • Putting the Pieces Together: Practical Strategies for Implementing Evidence-Based Practices

    Putting the Pieces Together: Practical Strategies for Implementing Evidence-Based Practices Cover
    Putting the Pieces Together: Practical Strategies for Implementing Evidence-Based Practices

    Those new to the implementation of evidence-based practices (EBPs) will find this publication to be a great guide to the process. This manual is designed to be used “both as a checklist of key management concepts and as a reminder of important organizational issues that need to be addressed to achieve positive public safety outcomes in an evidence-based environment” (p. vii). There are six chapters contained in this publication: creating evidence-based community corrections systems; getting started; organizational assessment—to know where you are going, you need to know where you are; strategic planning—choosing your destination; mapping the route—developing a workplan; and ongoing quality improvement.

    Document
  • Cost-Benefit Analysis of Raising the Age of Juvenile Jurisdiction in North Carolina

    Cost-Benefit Analysis of Raising the Age of Juvenile Jurisdiction in North Carolina Cover
    Cost-Benefit Analysis of Raising the Age of Juvenile Jurisdiction in North Carolina

    Those looking to increase the age of juvenile jurisdiction to 18 will find this report useful in getting their shareholders on board with the change. The North Carolina Youth Accountability Planning Task Force was tasked with “implementing a plan to transfer 16- and 17-year-olds who commit misdemeanor and low-level, non-violent felony offenses to the juvenile system, while keeping 16- and 17-year-olds who commit serious violent felonies in the adult criminal justice system” (p. iii). These sections come after an executive summary: background; cost-benefit methodology; summary of the cost-benefit analysis; costs—law enforcement, courts, juvenile justice operations costs, and juvenile justice capital costs; benefits—criminal justice, victims, and youth; and conclusion. It was determined that the change in age will result in net benefits of $52.3 million a year.

    Document
  • Correctional Trainer

    Correctional Trainer Cover
    Correctional Trainer

    This DACUM Profile is for a Correctional Trainer. It covers the position's duties, tasks, knowledge, skills, attitudes, and equipment and tools.

    Document
  • Evidence-Based Practice Skills Assessment for Criminal Justice Organizations, Version 1.0

    Evidence-Based Practice Skills Assessment for Criminal Justice Organizations, Version 1.0 Cover
    Evidence-Based Practice Skills Assessment for Criminal Justice Organizations, Version 1.0

    "The Evidence-based Practice Skills Assessment (EBPSA) is a self-report measurement tool designed to gauge the extent to which correctional staff demonstrate the skills necessary to successfully implement Evidence-based Practices (EBP)” (p. 5). The EBPSA guide summarizes how using the EBPSA can enhance an organization’s ability to become a more effective evidence-based organization. A brief overview describes the development of the EBPSA. Additional sections address reliability analysis, scoring keys for each EBPSA form, and how to utilize the information obtained from the assessments.

    Document
  • National Institute of Corrections Training Evaluation Project: Training, Leadership, and Organizational Change: Focus on CLD and MDF

    National Institute of Corrections Training Evaluation Project: Training, Leadership, and Organizational Change: Focus on CLD and MDF

    <p>Results from the Training Evaluation Project assessing the training offered by the National Institute of Corrections are presented. “The primary purpose of this bulletin is to examine leadership from a 360 degree perspective, and to assess relationships between training, leadership, and organizational change” (p. 3). It appears Correctional Leadership Development increased transformational leadership practices while Management Development for the Future had a small effect on leadership change.</p>

    Document
  • National Institute of Corrections Training Evaluation Project: 2008 Evaluation Supplement: Learning, Application, and Action Plan Progress

    National Institute of Corrections Training Evaluation Project: 2008 Evaluation Supplement: Learning, Application, and Action Plan Progress

    <p>Results from the Training Evaluation Project assessing the training offered by the National Institute of Corrections are presented. This bulletin’s primary purpose is to update CwRC-NIC Bulletin 4 (NICIC no. 024801) results about four recent training programs not included in the pilot project findings. The programs are Inmate Behavior Management, Administering a Small Jail, Conducting Prison Security Audits, and How to Run a Direct Supervision Housing Unit—Training for Trainers. Participants reported high to very high rates of training-related learning at the end of the course; 50% over-estimated the potential application of training in their jobs; and 75% lacked estimated progress on action plans.</p>

    Document
  • National Institute of Corrections Training Evaluation Project: 2008 Evaluation Results: Satisfaction, Learning, and Action Plan Progress

    National Institute of Corrections Training Evaluation Project: 2008 Evaluation Results: Satisfaction, Learning, and Action Plan Progress

    <p>Results from the Training Evaluation Project assessing the training offered by the National Institute of Corrections are presented. Evaluations are made of more recent trainings instead of those conducted during the pilot phase of this project. The programs are Inmate Behavior Management, Administering a Small Jail, Conducting Prison Security Audits, and How to Run a Direct Supervision Housing Unit—Training for Trainers. On a 5 point scale, participants rated satisfaction with training and trainers a 4.52 and 4.77 respectively, the learning of training-related knowledge and skills a 4.55, and progress on action plans a 3.19.</p>

    Document
  • National Institute of Corrections Training Evaluation Project, 2005-2007: Training Results, Activity Level Changes, and Implementation Results

    National Institute of Corrections Training Evaluation Project, 2005-2007: Training Results, Activity Level Changes, and Implementation Results

    <p>Results from the Training Evaluation Project assessing the training offered by the National Institute of Corrections are presented. This bulletin covers “training results (progress on training objectives), activity level changes (pre- and post-training behavior), and implementation results (in the workplace)” (p.1). Participants made moderate to substantial progress in meeting training objectives, engaged in 70.4% of key training-related behaviors, and made moderate progress implementing training objectives.</p>

    Document
  • Crisis Intervention Teams: A Frontline Response to Mental Illness in Corrections [Lesson Plans and Participant's Manual]

    Crisis Intervention Teams: A Frontline Response to Mental Illness in Corrections  Cover
    Crisis Intervention Teams: A Frontline Response to Mental Illness in Corrections [Lesson Plans and Participant's Manual]

    The tools, strategies, and techniques that will allow corrections staff, mental health service providers, and advocates to work together to develop and implement a crisis intervention team (CIT) are presented. CITs help reduce crisis situations, improve safety, and promote better outcomes for persons with mental illness. Participants will learn: about the core elements of a locally developed and owned CIT for managing mental illness in prisons, jails, and community corrections; how to develop collaborative partnerships and implement a CIT model that takes a team approach engaging community stakeholders, including corrections agencies, local mental health agencies, family advocacy groups, and others; and how to defend a CIT’s effectiveness in enhancing correctional staff’s knowledge and skills, aiding administrators in improved management and care for a special population, reducing liability and cost, improving community partnerships for increased access to resources and supports, and increasing safety for all. Overall, this training program focuses on building an agency’s capacity to implement a locally owned and administered CIT program and the training for that program. Sections of this manual include: crisis intervention teams—history, benefits, and successes; partnership and stakeholder development; organizational leadership and program sustainability; data collection and evaluation; planning and preparing for CIT training; and Program Development and Implementation Plan (PDIP).

    Document
  • Hitting the Wall: Dealing with Stress in Corrections [Lesson Plan and Participant's Manual]

    Dealing with Stress in Corrections [Lesson Plans and Participant's Manual] Cover
    Hitting the Wall: Dealing with Stress in Corrections [Lesson Plan and Participant's Manual]

    Issues surrounding stress in a correctional setting, like the effects, sources, and symptoms of stress, burnout, and coping strategies, are covered during this 6.5 hour course. Participants will be able to: define stress and identify the effects of stress; identify the sources of stress; identify the physical and behavioral symptoms of stress; define burnout and identify the stages of burnout; identify positive and negative coping strategies; summarize the key components of “My Pyramid”; recognize how thoughts, feelings, and attitudes lead to predictable patterns of behavior; practice “objective detachment” in observing and describing thoughts, feelings, and attitudes; and practice identifying stress-mitigating responses to work-related situations. Also included is the PowerPoint presentation, video vignettes, and participant handouts.

    Document
  • Employment and Female Offenders: An Update of the Empirical Research

    Employment and Female Offenders:  An Update of the Empirical Research Cover
    Employment and Female Offenders: An Update of the Empirical Research

    “The purpose of this bulletin is to explore the literature and summarize the empirical evidence related to the impact of employment on the criminal behavior of women” (p. 2). Sections comprising this publication are: female offender demographics; barriers to employment—overview, the role of the family and the community, time-management skills, and the role of agency; correctional education and vocational programs—education programs, vocational/technical programs, overall effectiveness of these programs, and outcomes for female offenders in educational and vocational programs; employment and crime—the role of employment and desistance from crime, employment outcomes and female offenders, and exploring gender differences in employment and crime; and conclusion.

    Document
  • Crisis Intervention Teams: An Effective Response to Mental Illness in Corrections [Satellite/Internet Broadcast]

    Crisis Intervention Teams: An Effective Response to Mental Illness in Corrections Cover
    Crisis Intervention Teams: An Effective Response to Mental Illness in Corrections [Satellite/Internet Broadcast]

    Our nation’s jails, prisons, and community corrections agencies are confronted daily with substantial numbers of persons with mental illness in custody and under supervision. Mental illness in corrections demands an urgency of response, services, and care. Correctional staff have attempted to manage individuals suffering mental illness with varying degrees of success. In searching for meaningful methods of response, some agencies, in partnership with stakeholder communities, have implemented Crisis Intervention Teams (CITs).

    CITs have matured from a law enforcement first responder model to new community partnerships with corrections. This team approach incorporates community, frontline law enforcement, and corrections agencies in a collaborative effort to address this growing problem. CITs are effective in enhancing correctional staffs’ knowledge and skills, aiding administrators in improved management and care for a special population, reducing liability and cost, improving community partnerships for increased access to resources and supports, and increasing safety for all.

    Participants will be able to:

    1. Describe the core elements of CIT.
    2. Describe the benefits of CIT for correctional staff, community stakeholders, persons with mental illnesses, and local criminal justice and mental health agencies.
    3. Identify ways to sustain a systemwide CIT program supported by key stakeholders and active community involvement.
    4. Assess agency readiness to start a CIT program and identify resources for implementation.
    Video
    Streaming Video
  • Greening Corrections: People, Programs, and Practices [Satellite/Internet Broadcast held July 14, 2010]

    Greening Corrections: People, Programs, and Practices [Satellite/Internet Broadcast held July 14, 2010] Cover
    Greening Corrections: People, Programs, and Practices [Satellite/Internet Broadcast held July 14, 2010]

    This program seeks to increase environmental awareness among corrections professionals and focuses attention on the need to make correctional facilities more energy and resource efficient. This broadcast:

    • Explores the feasibility of introducing green collar job readiness training programs
    • Assesses correctional industries capability to adopt “green” practices
    • And identifies strategies to assess cost saving options for correctional agencies to operate “self sustaining” facilities and programs.
    Video
  • Core Competencies: A Resource for Parole Board Chairs, Members, and Executive Staff

    Core Competencies: A Resource for Parole Board Chairs, Members, and Executive Staff Cover
    Core Competencies: A Resource for Parole Board Chairs, Members, and Executive Staff

    New parole board members and parole executives should read this publication. It will introduce them to the core competencies they need to have to effectively execute their public responsibilities. Chapters cover: the broad context of parole work—parole’s function, purpose, and role in the criminal justice system, parole and other state or local entities, and legal and ethical issues; discharging duties effectively—leadership, strategic planning, emerging best practices and evidence-based practices, and collaboration; and individual case decisionmaking—tools that promote consistent outcomes for similar cases, parole hearings, interviews and file reviews, parole conditions that support the goals of the parole board or agency and evidence-based principles and practices, and violation decisionmaking.

    Document
  • Cell Phones as Prison Contraband

    Cell Phones as Prison Contraband Cover
    Cell Phones as Prison Contraband

    The authors “focused particularly on the methods of concealment, as well as preventive strategies, including detection and proposed legislation, to minimize the harm of cell phone use by inmates” (p.1). The following sections are contained in this article: possession by prisoners; seriousness of the problem; concealment by inmates; detection by authorities; jamming and legal considerations; additional concerns; recommendations; and conclusion.

    Document
  • Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Resources

    Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Resources cover
    Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Resources

    This DVD contains NIC videos, DOJ proposed standards, an NIC e-course and dozens of documents to help you learn about the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA).

    The disc includes:
    The following videos:

    • Facing Prison Rape: How the Prison Rape Elimination Act Affects You (2004)
    • Responding to Prisoner Rape: Assessing Your Agency's Response to Prison Sexual Assault--in English and Spanish (2005)
    • Keeping Our Kids Safe: PREA and Juvenile Justice (2006)

    And dozens of documents, including:

    • Breaking the Code of Silence: Correctional Officers' Handbook on Identifying and Addressing Sexual Misconduct (2007)
    • PREA Implications for Sheriffs: The Facts (2006)
    • Managing Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Intersex Inmates: Is Your Jail Ready? (2007)
    • National Prison Rape Elimination Commission Report
    Mixed Media
  • It’s About Time: Aging Prisoners, Increasing Costs, and Geriatric Release

    It’s About Time: Aging Prisoners, Increasing Costs, and Geriatric Release Cover
    It’s About Time: Aging Prisoners, Increasing Costs, and Geriatric Release

    This report, “based upon a statutory review of geriatric release provisions…offers recommendations for responding to the disparities between geriatric release policies and practice” (p.2). Agencies will want to look this document over to see if they are compliant with their own geriatric release laws. These sections follow an executive summary: introduction; background; state approaches to releasing older inmates vary; examining the gap between intent and impact; recommendations; and conclusion.

    Document
  • New Jail Planning: Getting It Right

    New Jail Planning: Getting It Right Cover
    New Jail Planning: Getting It Right

    This video explores the lessons learned by four communities that built new jails. The communities utilized the four major steps of the Facility Developmental Process model:

    • Determine the need and feasibility;
    • Decide to build, plan operations;
    • Design the jail;
    • And build the jail, plan the transition.
    Document
  • TPC Case Management Handbook: An Integrated Case Management Approach

    TPC Case Management Handbook: An Integrated Case Management Approach Cover
    TPC Case Management Handbook: An Integrated Case Management Approach

    “This handbook is designed for teams of correctional and noncorrectional staff at the policy, management, and line staff levels who have been charged with implementing improvements in supervision and case management that support an overall strategy to reduce recidivism and enhance community safety through successful offender reentry” (p.1). Seven chapters are contained in this publication: an overview of the Integrated Case Management (ICM) approach; the critical challenges and strengths of the ICM approach; the nuts and bolts of the ICM approach, how it will look in practice; roles and responsibilities of staff; organizational supports, necessary resources for ICM to succeed at the case level; implementation strategy for agencies committing to ICM; and a final word on organizational and cultural change. Sample documents related to ICM are also included in the appendixes.

    Document
  • Overview of Research Findings on Pretrial Risk Assessment and Pretrial Supervision

    Overview of Research Findings on Pretrial Risk Assessment and Pretrial Supervision Cover
    Overview of Research Findings on Pretrial Risk Assessment and Pretrial Supervision

    If you are contemplating the use of another agency’s pretrial risk assessment tool without modification to your own organization’s needs you may want to read this report. The use of pretrial risk assessment and pretrial supervision are examined in this report. Since there has been little to no compatibility found between studies of risk assessment tool utilization, it is suggested that the application of an instrument from one jurisdiction to another probably will not work. The same applies to the use of pretrial supervision programs.

    Document
  • Chief Jail Inspectors' Network Meeting Proceedings, 2009

    Chief Jail Inspectors' Network Meeting Proceedings, 2009 Cover
    Chief Jail Inspectors' Network Meeting Proceedings, 2009

    Proceedings from the 11th annual two day Chief Jail Inspectors' Meeting are presented. Topics discussed include: meeting overview and highlights; introduction; ACA CORE Standards update; NSA Committee update; federal agency update; New Jersey Information System; Ohio report—changes ahead for Ohio jails; data collection; construction trends; alternatives to incarceration; Justice Policy Institute article—“Jailing Communities”; doing everything with nothing; NIC update; Jail Transition/Reentry to Community; Corrections Community; round table/small group planning; and evaluation and closeout.

    Document
  • Corrections Budgets in Free Fall: Finding Opportunities in Turbulent Times [Satellite/Internet Broadcast held on April 15, 2009]

    Corrections Budgets in Free Fall: Finding Opportunities in Turbulent Times Cover
    Corrections Budgets in Free Fall: Finding Opportunities in Turbulent Times [Satellite/Internet Broadcast held on April 15, 2009]

    Budget reductions don’t discriminate. Correctional agencies are being hit hard in these tough economic times with no relief from mandates. Prisons, jails, and community corrections are all faced with increasing workloads, combined with diminishing resources. Amid the worsening financial crisis, there are opportunities to implement evidence-based strategies that can maximize resources while preserving public safety.

    This 3-hour program provides an overview of opportunities that can help correctional organizations stay afloat in the current environment. Participants will be able to: explore the events and decisions that have contributed to the current fiscal crisis facing corrections; identify strategies for successfully managing operations with evidence-based practices; describe safe, effective criminal justice models that maximize resources while maintaining public safety; and identify partnerships for accessing community resources that can help corrections address challenges.</p>

    Video
  • Innovative Reentry Strategies: The Emerging Role of Correctional Industries [Satellite/Internet Broadcast held October 7, 2009]

    Innovative Reentry Strategies: The Emerging Role of Correctional Industries Cover
    Innovative Reentry Strategies: The Emerging Role of Correctional Industries [Satellite/Internet Broadcast held October 7, 2009]

    This program focuses on presenting new reentry strategies and highlight specific programs around the country that reflect best practices. Imagine a reentry program that reduces recidivism, changes lives, and makes prisons and jails safer with little or no cost to taxpayers. Such a program has been around for decades. It is correctional industries, an effective model for preparing offenders for employment upon release. The elements of this strategy include skills certification, positive change, collaboration with businesses and the community, and a focus on career development and job retention. Participants in this broadcast will be able to identify: the growing role of correctional industries in the reentry process; best practices in innovative correctional industries related to successful reentry; strategies for promoting collaborations that increase the effectiveness of correctional industries on reentry; positive reentry outcomes resulting from correctional industries; and the future of correctional industries.

    This program is Part 2 in a series on correctional industries; Part 1, Building Tomorrow's Workforce: An Effective Reentry Strategy (#023255), focuses on the history and benefits of correctional industries and ways to balance competing interests. Part 3, Correctional Industries: A Working Solution (#025293), explores how Correctional Industries make a significant difference in the lives of the offender population through testimony from national experts, correctional practitioners, and former offenders.

    Video
  • Emergency Preparedness Self-Audit Checklist for Smaller Jails[and]Emergency Preparedness Self-Audit Checklist for Larger Jails

    Emergency Preparedness Self-Audit Checklist for Smaller Jails [and] Emergency Preparedness Self-Audit Checklist for Larger Jails Cover
    Emergency Preparedness Self-Audit Checklist for Smaller Jails[and]Emergency Preparedness Self-Audit Checklist for Larger Jails

    Anyone preparing for an audit of their jail will find one of these check lists indispensable. This collection contains two chapters from “A Guide to Preparing for and Responding to Jail Emergencies: Self-Audit Checklists, Resource Materials, Case Studies” (NIC no. 023494): “Section 3--Emergency Preparedness Self-Audit Checklist for Smaller Jails”; and “Section 4--Emergency Preparedness Self-Audit Checklist for Larger Jails”.

    Document
  • Programs and Activities: Tools for Managing Inmate Behavior

    Programs and Activities: Tools for Managing Inmate Behavior Cover
    Programs and Activities: Tools for Managing Inmate Behavior

    “This manual not only will provide guidance to practitioners on improving inmate programs, but will also demonstrate that even with minimal resources, correctional professionals can plan, implement, and evaluate programs while realizing the benefits of improved inmate behavior” (p.vi). Four chapters are contained in this publication: the value of keeping jail inmates productively occupied; the administrator’s role in supporting inmate programs and activities; planning, implementing, and evaluating activities and programs; and inmate activities and programs—key decisions. Appendixes provide: sample worksheets; logic model flowchart; program examples; and program resources.

    Document
  • Risk Markers for Sexual Predation and Victimization in Prison

    Risk Markers for Sexual Predation and Victimization in Prison Cover
    Risk Markers for Sexual Predation and Victimization in Prison

    This study investigated the application of “empirically validated static and dynamic risk ma[r]kers for violence in the community to sexual predation and victimization in prisons” (p.2). Twelve chapters follow and abstract and executive summary: an introduction to the Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) and the study; methodology; the sexual behavior of incarcerated men and women; early life markers for sexual predation and victimization; violence and criminality as risk markers; sex risk markers; affective and perceptual states as risk markers; personality risk markers; structured and actuarial instruments for assessing violence risk; social environment risk markers; CHAID (Chi Square Automated Interaction Detector) classification for sexual behavior in prison; and conclusions and references. Many of the risk markers for sexual behavior in prisons are the same risk markers that predict violent behavior outside of prison. Sexual acts are “consistently associated with higher levels of threatened, physical, and relational violence within both the male and female institutions” (p.30).

    Document
  • A Quantitative and Qualitative Assessment of Electronic Monitoring

    A Quantitative and Qualitative Assessment of Electronic Monitoring Cover
    A Quantitative and Qualitative Assessment of Electronic Monitoring

    Agencies using or looking into utilizing home detention will find this report interesting. This report presents the findings of home detention’s impact on offender flight, violations of probation, commission of new crimes, personal relationships, families, employment, and community reintegration. Sections following an abstract and executive summary include: introduction; review of the literature; electronic monitoring in Florida; a quantitative assessment; a qualitative assessment; and policy implications and discussion. Home detention reduces recidivism of offenders by 31%.

    Document
  • Greening Juvenile Justice

    Greening Juvenile Justice Cover
    Greening Juvenile Justice

    The strength of this article is in its discussion of an often forgotten part of greening a facility—the use of environmentally safe cleaning products and practices. The Alameda County Juvenile Justice Center in San Leandro, California is the green facility that has achieved LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) certification.

    Document
  • Women and Reentry: Foundations for Success

    Women and Reentry: Foundations for Success Cover
    Women and Reentry: Foundations for Success

    The “most effective ways to meet the needs of returning female offenders” are explained (p.1). This report has these sections: overview; presentations—foundations of effective service; discussions—highlights and themes; going forward; and conclusion.

    Document
  • Facility Development Process

    Facility Development Process Cover
    Facility Development Process

    A facility development process plan is provided. Process phases are noted along the top of this flowchart: project recognition, needs assessment, go—no go, design, bidding, go—no go, construction, occupancy, and post occupancy. Elements occupying different places in the phases are listed on the side—tasks and then process tracks of non facility alternatives, transition, site, capital and operational funding, project delivery method, outcomes, professional services acquisition, and building support for the project.

    Document
  • 6 Evidence-Based Practices Proven to Lower Recidivism: Learning to Trust the Research

    6 Evidence-Based Practices Proven to Lower Recidivism: Learning to Trust the Research Cover
    6 Evidence-Based Practices Proven to Lower Recidivism: Learning to Trust the Research

    If you are concerned about recidivism, this article is for you. The author explains how six integrated practices will lower your recidivism rates. These are: risk/needs assessment; individual motivators; target the appropriate intervention; rewire the brain; increase positive reinforcement; and ongoing support.

    Web Page
  • Career Resource Centers: An Emerging Strategy for Improving Offender Employment Outcomes

    Career Resource Centers: An Emerging Strategy for Improving Offender Employment Outcomes Cover
    Career Resource Centers: An Emerging Strategy for Improving Offender Employment Outcomes

    “This bulletin highlights the ways career resource centers are being used in jails , prisons, and community supervision offices to improve the long-term employment prospects of offenders” (p.1). Sections of this publication include: common elements of career resource centers; getting started; working with inmate career clerks; building community ties; role of assessment in career resource centers; technology resources; finding champions and overcoming resistance; and future directions. Also included is a DVD with additional material. Resources contained on the DVD are: a PDF version of the bulletin; video interviews with many of the practitioners features in the bulletin; the CareerZone program; reentry guides from federal, state, and local correctional facilities; the Veterans Incarcerated Employability Workshop; a life-skills curriculum; virtual tours of career resource centers; links to Internet resources that promote the development of career resource centers; and career development documents that can be distributed to the inmate population.

    Document
  • National Study of Jail Suicide: 20 Years Later

    National Study of Jail Suicide: 20 Years Later Cover
    National Study of Jail Suicide: 20 Years Later

    This report “does more than simply present a calculation of suicide rates. It presents the most comprehensive updated information on the extent and distribution of inmate suicides throughout the country, including data on the changing face of suicide victims. Most important, the study challenges both jail and health-care officials and their respective staffs to remain diligent in identifying and managing suicidal inmates” (p.vii). Five chapters follow an executive summary: introduction; national study of jail suicides—20 years later; demographic findings of suicide data; special considerations; and conclusion. The majority of victims (98%) used hanging as their method of suicide, with 32% of all suicides occurring between 3:01 P.M. and 9 P.M., 2 to 14 days following arrest (27%).

    Document
  • Transition from Jail to Community Online Learning Toolkit

    Transition from Jail to Community Online Learning Toolkit Cover
    Transition from Jail to Community Online Learning Toolkit

    This online learning resource is an essential ingredient in the development of programs designed to help offenders reenter the community upon their release from jail. This program contains the following nine modules: getting started; leadership, vision, and organizational culture; collaborative structure and joint ownership; data-driven understanding of local reentry; targeted intervention strategies; screening and assessment; transition plan development; targeted transition interventions; and self-evaluation and sustainability.

    Web Page
  • A Framework for Evidence-Based Decision Making in Local Criminal Justice Systems

    A Framework for Evidence-Based Decision Making in Local Criminal Justice Systems cover
    A Framework for Evidence-Based Decision Making in Local Criminal Justice Systems

    This report is essential reading for individuals wanting to achieve "measurable reductions of pretrial misconduct and post-conviction reoffending" (p.6). Eight sections follow an introduction (a new paradigm for the justice system): underlying premises; the key decision points, decision makers, and stakeholders in the criminal justice system; examining justice system decision making through the lens of harm reduction; the principles underlying the framework; applying evidence-based principles to practice; key challenges to implementing this framework; collaboration—a key ingredient of an evidence-based system; and building evidence-based agencies.

    Document
  • Effectively Managing Aging and Geriatric Offenders [Satellite/Internet Broadcast held March 11, 2010]

    Effectively Managing Aging and Geriatric Offenders Cover
    Effectively Managing Aging and Geriatric Offenders [Satellite/Internet Broadcast held March 11, 2010]

    This 3-hour program will interest anyone dealing with geriatric offenders. Issues covered during this presentation include:

    • Who geriatric offenders are
    • Awareness of their needs
    • Staff training
    • And special considerations for this population.

    Participants will be able to: develop criteria to identify geriatric offenders; describe challenges and options for training staff and improving day to day operations to better manage this population; identify strategies, including stand-alone and integrated approaches, to address geriatric offenders’ needs; and identify sources of information and technical support for developing and implementing programs and services for geriatric offenders.

    Video
  • Improving Responses to People with Mental Illnesses: Tailoring Law Enforcement Initiatives to Individual Jurisdictions

    Improving Responses to People with Mental Illnesses: Tailoring Law Enforcement Initiatives to Individual Jurisdictions Cover
    Improving Responses to People with Mental Illnesses: Tailoring Law Enforcement Initiatives to Individual Jurisdictions

    While this guide is written for police departments, sheriff’s offices should find it helpful for developing approaches to interacting with mentally ill people. The step-by-step program design process incorporates seven actions. Additionally, program designs in action are covered showing responses to specific problems and also jurisdictional characteristics.

    Document

Pages