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Affordable Care Act - Enrollment

Anyone dealing with the provision of services to justice-involved youth should read this publication. “This report outlines federal and state eligibility, enroll¬ment, and outreach strategies that can help facilitate seamless coverage for system-involved youth. Adoption of these initiatives has the potential to improve the lives of juvenile justice-involved youth and their families, increase their ability to remain in the community, and ultimately, reduce recidivism. Key to the success of these strategies will be ongoing collaboration between the multiple state and federal agencies that interact with the juvenile justice population” (p. 7). Sections of this publication discuss: Medicaid eligibility options to ease community reentry—suspending eligibility, continuous eligibility, presumptive eligibility, and special enrollment procedures (Oregon, Colorado, and Texas); implications of health reform for juvenile justice-involved youth—eligibility and enrollment policies; emerging issues—transitions in coverage between Medicaid, CHIP (Children's Health Insurance Program) and exchanges; and evidence based practices for meeting the needs of juvenile justice-involved youth.

Facilitating Access to Health Care Coverage for Juvenile Justice-Involved Youth Cover

“As states and juvenile justice stakeholders work to facilitate health coverage and access for system-involved youth, they can draw upon the experiences of their counterparts across the country to improve eligibility, enrollment, and outreach processes. Medicaid eligibility strategies in several states have already facilitated seamless coverage for juvenile justice-involved youth, and consumer assistance programs created by the Affordable Care Act (ACA) will provide additional resources to support continuity of care. Collaboration among Medicaid and juvenile justice systems and stakeholders will be essential to fully realizing the opportunities presented by health care reform.” Sections of this brief cover: the issue of Medicaid coverage for justice-involved youth; innovations—Medicaid eligibility options (suspending eligibility, continuous eligibility, and presumptive eligibility), expedited Medicaid enrollment, and outreach; lessons learned; and looking forward.

Facilitating Health Care Coverage for Juvenile Justice-Involved Youth Cover

"Medicaid allows for—and the federal government encourages—continued eligibility for coverage for a person who is incarcerated. Although the ACA [Affordable Care Act] did not address suspension versus termination, for states that are expanding Medicaid the number of inmates eligible for coverage will increase dramatically and the benefits to counties of suspending instead of terminating their coverage will be substantial" (p. 1). This brief addresses issues associated with suspending Medicaid coverage for prisoners. Sections cover: why ensuring access to Medicaid post-release is important to counties; access to treatment positively impacts public safety; what the difference is between suspension and termination of Medicaid coverage; states that suspend rather than terminate; what counties can do with highlights from Maricopa County (AZ), Salt Lake City (UT), California, and Oregon.

Health Coverage and County Jails: Suspension vs. Termination Cover

Drawing on the research literature and interviews with national experts in health care and coverage, fatherhood programming, health coverage marketing, and health communications, this brief discusses new health coverage and care opportunities for justice-involved men and the importance of implementing community-based strategies for bringing justice-involved men into coverage and coordinated health care.

"This webinar explains and clarifies the issues related to allowable uses of federal Medicaid funds for incarcerated individuals, and provides an example of how corrections departments can leverage cost savings as a result. The discussion focuses on the challenges related to implementation and establishment of cross-agency collaboration, and the subsequent successes and cost savings that can be achieved." The agenda of this webinar is: "Introduction" by Fred Osher; "Financing Health Care for Individuals Involved in the Criminal Justice System" by Gabrielle de la Gueronniere; "An Introduction to Medicaid Eligibility and the Application Process" by Terri L. Catlett, Larry Huggins, and William Appel; and "Moderated Q&A Session" moderated by Osher.

Maximizing Medicaid: An Innovative Approach to Finance Health Care for Criminal Justice Populations [Webinar] Cover

"Financing health care for inmates can be a significant portion of state correctional spending for some states with health care costs ranging from an estimated 6 percent to 33 percent of institutional corrections spending in 2008, the most recent estimate available. The combination of expanded Medicaid eligibility and enhanced funding for those newly eligible as allowed under PPACA [Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act] gives states additional incentives to enroll inmates in Medicaid and obtain federal matching funds, and increases the federal responsibility for financing allowable services for inmates. Questions exist about the potential costs to the federal government, because little is known about how many inmates are eligible for Medicaid or the extent to which states are obtaining federal matching funds for allowable services … In this report, we provide information on the proportion of inmates eligible for Medicaid, and state efforts to enroll inmates in Medicaid and obtain federal matching funds for allowable services" (p. 2). While a large percentage of inmates will be eligible for Medicaid in the 27 states that have expanded Medicaid eligibility, only a very small percentage will be eligible for federal Medicaid funds. The impact to federal spending will be extremely limited.

Medicaid: Information on Inmate Eligibility and Federal Costs for Allowable Services Cover

This Factsheet discusses Presumptive Eligibility: what it is, options to use, key facts, and FAQs.

"People leaving prison often return to the community lacking health insurance and thus access to appropriate health care. Many have mental illness, substance abuse, and other health issues that need treatment and compound reintegration challenges. Left untreated, they are at risk of falling into a cycle of relapse, reoffending, and reincarceration. Providing Medicaid coverage upon release has the potential to improve continuity of care that may interrupt this cycle. This report examines whether efforts to enroll people in Medicaid prior to their release from prison are successful in generating health insurance coverage after release. Urban Institute (Urban) researchers analyzed data from Oregon’s pre-Affordable Care Act (ACA) Medicaid program to determine the extent to which released prisoners successfully gained coverage" (p. 1). The results from this study my help your state in ensuring continuity of care for newly released offenders.

Prison Inmates' Prerelease Application for Medicaid Cover

The purpose of this letter and its attachment is to provide guidance on facilitating access to covered Medicaid services for eligible individuals prior to and after a stay in a correctional
institution.

Resource guide for corrections system professials—to assist with the implementation of provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in order to maximize health care reform opportunities.

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