Back to top

Correctional Healthcare - NIC Broadcasts

Did you know that 99% of all leadership occurs not from the TOP but from the MIDDLE of an organization? Join the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) to explore the qualities of effective leaders at all levels and the essential skills necessary to flourish in one’s own management style while respecting organizational structure and mission. Through a series of interactive activities, we will explore how current and future leaders can bring relevant tools, values, and influence to and from every level of a correctional organization. 

(PH)REAL: PHilosophy, Relationship, Equipping, Attitude and Leadership

Our nation’s jails, prisons, and community corrections agencies are confronted daily with substantial numbers of persons with mental illness in custody and under supervision. Mental illness in corrections demands an urgency of response, services, and care. Correctional staff have attempted to manage individuals suffering mental illness with varying degrees of success. In searching for meaningful methods of response, some agencies, in partnership with stakeholder communities, have implemented Crisis Intervention Teams (CITs).

CITs have matured from a law enforcement first responder model to new community partnerships with corrections. This team approach incorporates community, frontline law enforcement, and corrections agencies in a collaborative effort to address this growing problem. CITs are effective in enhancing correctional staffs’ knowledge and skills, aiding administrators in improved management and care for a special population, reducing liability and cost, improving community partnerships for increased access to resources and supports, and increasing safety for all.

Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the core elements of CIT.
  2. Describe the benefits of CIT for correctional staff, community stakeholders, persons with mental illnesses, and local criminal justice and mental health agencies.
  3. Identify ways to sustain a systemwide CIT program supported by key stakeholders and active community involvement.
  4. Assess agency readiness to start a CIT program and identify resources for implementation.
Crisis Intervention Teams: An Effective Response to Mental Illness in Corrections Cover
Crisis Intervention Teams: An Effective Response to Mental Illness in Corrections [Satellite/Internet Broadcast]

Research shows that there are a disproportionate number of justice involved individuals suffering from chronic illness and/ or mental health and substance abuse disorders. We also know that a majority of the justice-involved individuals are young adults and unemployed or earn an income that is well below the federal poverty line leaving them without the ability to obtain health care. There is now an opportunity to enhance collaboration between the criminal justice/corrections and healthcare systems. Early estimates indicate a significant number of justice-involved individuals may be eligible for provisions under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA), specifically; enrollment in Medicaid or the ability to purchase health care coverage through state health insurance exchanges. Because of the many health care expansion possibilities for this population we are witnessing an unprecedented opportunity to help connect the justice population to healthcare coverage and the associated healthcare services.

Federal, state and local criminal justice systems are poised to change the way they do business with the advent of the ACA. It is now possible for millions of low income, justice- involved individuals to obtain healthcare or insurance coverage for their physical and behavioral health needs. This far reaching system change will impact every decision point in the criminal justice system from arrest to individuals returning to the community upon release.

Presented on June 18, 2014, this program informed and increased awareness around this historic healthcare expansion opportunity. The broadcast highlighted promising practices by providing resources and strategies to expand healthcare coverage to justice-involved individuals. During this national discussion and broadcast by the National Institute of Corrections, presenters:

  • Established the relevance of the Affordable Care Act to the criminal justice system.
  • Provided concrete examples for collaboration and system linkages between the criminal justice system and healthcare system.
  • Provided healthcare enrollment strategies to increase informed decision-making between criminal justice and healthcare stakeholders.
Health Reform and Public Safety cover

Data continues to show that women are entering the justice system at rates exceeding male offenders and bring with them extremely complex and multi-layered behavioral and physical health issues. While systems must make choices on how best to deploy limited staffing and programming resources, this broadcast series is an opportunity to explore methods of coordination between behavioral and physical health care. This broadcast is the 2nd offering in a two part series addressing health related issues with women in our nation’s justice systems. On August 15, 2012 the first in the two-part series “Health, Justice and Women: Transforming Systems—Changing Lives” was aired and explored research, strategies and resources designed to effect health care practices with justice-involved women.

This broadcast “Health, Justice, Women: Behavioral Health and Ob/Gyn,” held on February 20, 2013, will take a closer look at areas introduced in the first broadcast with a focus specifically on the complexities of behavioral, obstetrical and gynecological issue that impact all women in our justice systems. Through short lecture, slides, video, interviews, practical vignettes and introduction of a broad array of resources, we will address behavioral health issues and initiate discussion around ob/gyn issues that impact women through their lifespan but that often create broad challenges to our agencies. As part of those discussions, we will spend some time on reproductive health issues to include pre and post-partum issues as well as the use of restraints during pregnancy.

During this discussion, participants will: Explore how research from the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study, the National Prevention Strategy (NPS), and others can inform correctional health practices for justice-involved women; Explore models in correctional settings of evidence-based behavioral and women’s health services; Identify how professional health care organizations continue to contribute to correctional health care for women; and Initiate agency-based conversations regarding creation of and/or enhancement of health care practices for women. Also included are the PowerPoint slides from the presentation and the Participant Guide.

Health, Justice, Women: Behavioral Health and OB/GYN [Internet Broadcast] Cover
Health, Justice, Women: Behavioral Health and OB/GYN - Part 1 [Internet Broadcast]

Data continues to show that women are entering the justice system at rates exceeding male offenders and bring with them extremely complex and multi-layered behavioral and physical health issues. While systems must make choices on how best to deploy limited staffing and programming resources, this broadcast series is an opportunity to explore methods of coordination between behavioral and physical health care. This broadcast is the 2nd offering in a two part series addressing health related issues with women in our nation’s justice systems. On August 15, 2012 the first in the two-part series “Health, Justice and Women: Transforming Systems—Changing Lives” was aired and explored research, strategies and resources designed to effect health care practices with justice-involved women.

This broadcast “Health, Justice, Women: Behavioral Health and Ob/Gyn,” held on February 20, 2013, will take a closer look at areas introduced in the first broadcast with a focus specifically on the complexities of behavioral, obstetrical and gynecological issue that impact all women in our justice systems. Through short lecture, slides, video, interviews, practical vignettes and introduction of a broad array of resources, we will address behavioral health issues and initiate discussion around ob/gyn issues that impact women through their lifespan but that often create broad challenges to our agencies. As part of those discussions, we will spend some time on reproductive health issues to include pre and post-partum issues as well as the use of restraints during pregnancy.

During this discussion, participants will: Explore how research from the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study, the National Prevention Strategy (NPS), and others can inform correctional health practices for justice-involved women; Explore models in correctional settings of evidence-based behavioral and women’s health services; Identify how professional health care organizations continue to contribute to correctional health care for women; and Initiate agency-based conversations regarding creation of and/or enhancement of health care practices for women. Also included are the PowerPoint slides from the presentation and the Participant Guide.

Health, Justice, Women: Behavioral Health and OB/GYN [Internet Broadcast] Cover
Health, Justice, Women: Behavioral Health and OB/GYN - Part 2 [Internet Broadcast]

Women and girls enter the criminal justice system with distinct and unique health care needs. Most are in their child bearing years, may have children, many are victims of abuse, have a mental health diagnosis, or typically exhibit more misconduct than male offenders. This complex mix of needs affects a system's ability to work effectively as it draws upon a higher percentage of resources to care for female offenders.

During this national discussion held on August 15, 2012, participants will explore research, strategies, and resources designed to effect health care practices used with justice-involved women. At the conclusion of this broadcast, participants will be able to: Define and describe the unique health care needs of women involved with the justice system; Apply the public health model to working with justice-involved women in corrections settings; Express the critical role leaders play in creating systems and organizational processes that meet the health care needs of justice-involved women; and Identify strategies, resources, and partnerships that address the health care needs of justice-involved women as they reenter their communities.

Health, Justice, Women: Transforming Systems--Changing Lives [Internet Broadcast] Cover
Health, Justice, Women: Transforming Systems--Changing Lives - Part 1 [Internet Broadcast]

Women and girls enter the criminal justice system with distinct and unique health care needs. Most are in their child bearing years, may have children, many are victims of abuse, have a mental health diagnosis, or typically exhibit more misconduct than male offenders. This complex mix of needs affects a system's ability to work effectively as it draws upon a higher percentage of resources to care for female offenders.

During this national discussion held on August 15, 2012, participants will explore research, strategies, and resources designed to effect health care practices used with justice-involved women. At the conclusion of this broadcast, participants will be able to: Define and describe the unique health care needs of women involved with the justice system; Apply the public health model to working with justice-involved women in corrections settings; Express the critical role leaders play in creating systems and organizational processes that meet the health care needs of justice-involved women; and Identify strategies, resources, and partnerships that address the health care needs of justice-involved women as they reenter their communities.

Health, Justice, Women: Transforming Systems--Changing Lives [Internet Broadcast] Cover
Health, Justice, Women: Transforming Systems--Changing Lives - Part 2 [Internet Broadcast]

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the most common blood-borne infection in the United States, with approximately three million persons living with current infection. Of the two million individuals incarcerated in US federal and state prisons, a February 2015 Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) special report states that 9.8% of these individuals have Hepatitis C. With the advent of a one pill per day treatment regimen, the management of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) in corrections is rapidly evolving.

“Correctional health is a key to public health.” – (Retired) Vice Admiral Richard H. Carmona, M.D., M.P.H., FACS, United States Surgeon General.

This internet broadcast from the National Institute of Correction (NIC) covers the newest innovations in treatment practices, protocols, and management of HCV and its implications for criminal justice, corrections organizations and public health.

Topics discussed include the current prevalence of Hepatitis C in the general public in comparison to the correctional population, highlighting the importance of treating pervasive co-occurring substance use disorders. As one of the first lines of defense in public health, correctional agencies have a critical opportunity to screen, diagnose, and treat.

We will identify several correctional systems throughout the country which are effectively managing their HCV infected population, focusing on successes and challenges of management. Presenters will also share recommendations and resources for jurisdictions looking to implement and improve upon existing programs.

This broadcast will answer the following questions: What is the scope of HCV as an issue, while comparing and contrasting HCV prevalence in the general and corrections populations ; What is HCV?, How is it transmitted?, What is the current prevalence?, and What are current treatment options and related costs?; What are the policies, protocols and procedures implemented by agencies that are effectively managing HCV?; How can agencies improve the coordination of care and services for offenders upon release?; How can we proactively address current and future challenges such as developing and implementing consistent screening and treatment protocols; data collection; pharmaceutical cost management; and collaboration with local, state and federal partners?; and What are recommended resources and next steps for jurisdictions interested in implementing or improving an existing HCV program?

Hepatitis C in Corrections cover
Hepatitis C in Corrections: Innovations in Treatment and Management of a Public Health Challenge - Part 1 [Internet Broadcast]

Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the most common blood-borne infection in the United States, with approximately three million persons living with current infection. Of the two million individuals incarcerated in US federal and state prisons, a February 2015 Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) special report states that 9.8% of these individuals have Hepatitis C. With the advent of a one pill per day treatment regimen, the management of Hepatitis C virus (HCV) in corrections is rapidly evolving.

“Correctional health is a key to public health.” – (Retired) Vice Admiral Richard H. Carmona, M.D., M.P.H., FACS, United States Surgeon General.

This internet broadcast from the National Institute of Correction (NIC) covers the newest innovations in treatment practices, protocols, and management of HCV and its implications for criminal justice, corrections organizations and public health.

Topics discussed include the current prevalence of Hepatitis C in the general public in comparison to the correctional population, highlighting the importance of treating pervasive co-occurring substance use disorders. As one of the first lines of defense in public health, correctional agencies have a critical opportunity to screen, diagnose, and treat.

We will identify several correctional systems throughout the country which are effectively managing their HCV infected population, focusing on successes and challenges of management. Presenters will also share recommendations and resources for jurisdictions looking to implement and improve upon existing programs.

This broadcast will answer the following questions: What is the scope of HCV as an issue, while comparing and contrasting HCV prevalence in the general and corrections populations ; What is HCV?, How is it transmitted?, What is the current prevalence?, and What are current treatment options and related costs?; What are the policies, protocols and procedures implemented by agencies that are effectively managing HCV?; How can agencies improve the coordination of care and services for offenders upon release?; How can we proactively address current and future challenges such as developing and implementing consistent screening and treatment protocols; data collection; pharmaceutical cost management; and collaboration with local, state and federal partners?; and What are recommended resources and next steps for jurisdictions interested in implementing or improving an existing HCV program?

Hepatitis C in Corrections cover
Hepatitis C in Corrections: Innovations in Treatment and Management of a Public Health Challenge - Part 2 [Internet Broadcast]

This 3-hour program, originally broadcast December 9, 2009, and hosted by the National Institute of Corrections, will address the issue of correctional facility operations and H1N1 (swine flu). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and criminal justice agencies have joined forces to provide some practical strategies for prevention and control.

Participants of this satellite/Internet broadcast will be able to: define the current status of the H1N1 pandemic, including perspectives on its effect on criminal justice issues; outline a rational plan for H1N1 prevention and control strategies, including how to plan for a pandemic and how to plan for the seasonal flu; describe methods for ensuring that staff and inmates receive timely and accurate information about H1N1; and identify and access information resources on H1N1.

Locking Up H1N1 Cover

Pages

Subscribe to Correctional Healthcare - NIC Broadcasts