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Criminal Justice Coordinating Committees - NIC Resources

This resource provides a foundation for the efforts of sheriffs and jail administrators to provide the public information about jails generally, their jails specifically, and the need for community interest in local jail issues. It can also be used to educate prospective jail employees about local detention.
Closed captions are only available in the DVD version.

Beyond the Myths: The Jail in Your Community
Beyond the Myths: The Jail in Your Community

This "guide spells out a practical team-based approach to envisioning the kind of criminal justice system a community wants, assessing the current system, and planning and implementing strategies for 'getting it right'" (p.ix). Five sections comprise this manual: an overview of a comprehensive planning process; establishing the policy team and the process; keeping the focus on outcomes; building an understanding of your system; and moving from understanding to change.

Getting It Right: Collaborative Problem Solving for Criminal Justice Cover

This guide is currently being to revised through a cooperative with National Criminal Justice Association (NCJA).

The development, implementation, and operation of a local criminal justice coordinating committee (CJCC) are described. In particular, this guide provides a look at how a CJCC can alleviate jail crowding and accomplish other system improvements. The following sections comprise this guide: executive summary; introduction; a framework for justice planning and coordination; coordinating mechanisms -- a developmental view; and guiding principles for CJCCs. Appendixes provide: a checklist for forming a CJCC; contact information for jurisdictions mentioned; other CJCC resources; a sample charge; and sample bylaws.

Guidelines for Developing a Criminal Justice Coordinating Committee Cover

This guide is currently being to revised through a cooperative with National Criminal Justice Association (NCJA).

“This guide describes for county administrators and other local officials why staff is needed, who becomes good staff, how many staff persons are needed, what the costs are to develop a staff and how staff can be funded, where staff can be found, how the best applicants can be selected, where staff are best housed in the system, and how staff can be trained and evaluated. The guide also offers practical advice for planning staff by describing important activities to do when starting in the position, major roles and responsibilities, and activities to perform as the criminal justice coordinating committee (CJCC) identifies and resolves systemwide issues” (p. xi). Four chapters follow an executive summary: introduction—the need for local planning and coordination with the criminal justice coordinating committee (CJCC) and staff being the solution; obtaining criminal justice planning staff—how the CCJC can hire the best person for the job since the abilities of CJCC staff are very different from other justice system planners; suggestions for the criminal justice planning staff—the major roles they must fulfill; and regional networks of local criminal justice planning functions—the need for networking and collaboration among staff or other committees to achieve better outcomes than by doing it alone. Appendixes provide: a sample Criminal Justice Planner/Analyst job description; and sample mission, vision, and values for criminal justice planning staff or unit.

Guidelines for Staffing a Local Criminal Justice Coordinating Committee Cover

Anyone who needs to gather and analyze data concerning various jail-related issues will find this manual useful. This document provides guidance on how information can fuel policy decision making. Chapters comprising this guide are: introduction; good management requires good information; information that should be collected; preparing for the data collection; how to locate and capture information; how to put it all together; how to analyze information; how to interpret information; sharing information with others; and getting the most from your information system. Appendixes include: a glossary of statistical terms for non-statisticians; annotated bibliography; manual data collection procedures and sample forms; inmate profile data collection; incident data code book sample; transport data collection; tables for determining sample size; simple random sampling; calculating the standard deviation; calculating Chi Square; and manual data display.

How to Collect and Analyze Data: A Manual for Sheriffs and Jail Administrators Cover

Steps involved in developing an understanding of jail population dynamics and factors behind jail crowding are delineated. Sections of this report include: executive summary; how can factors behind jail crowding be identified?; key questions to ask in order to understand jail population dynamics; trends that are driving jail population growth; how to forecast future needs; benefits and elements of an effective analytic process; and elements of the analytic process. Appendixes include: "Preventing Jail Crowding: A Practical Guide" by Robert C. Cushman; jail survey form; data sources; proposed work plan for criminal justice analysts; and items to be included in the agency database.

Jail Crowding:  Understanding Jail Population Dynamics Cover
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