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Probation and Parole - Parole

A “framework that identifies the characteristics and competencies that paroling authorities must have to be effective in implementing evidence-based practices in the context of transition programs and services” is presented (p.8). These sections follow an executive summary: introduction; the impact of history on current reform efforts; the key elements of the parole process—the institutional, reentry, community, and discharge phases; the foundation of system effectiveness—evidence-based practice, organizational development, and collaboration; moving forward; and conclusion. An appendix lists intermediate and process measures for implementation.

Comprehensive Framework for Paroling Authorities in an Era of Evidence-Based Practice Cover

New parole board members and parole executives should read this publication. It will introduce them to the core competencies they need to have to effectively execute their public responsibilities. Chapters cover: the broad context of parole work—parole’s function, purpose, and role in the criminal justice system, parole and other state or local entities, and legal and ethical issues; discharging duties effectively—leadership, strategic planning, emerging best practices and evidence-based practices, and collaboration; and individual case decisionmaking—tools that promote consistent outcomes for similar cases, parole hearings, interviews and file reviews, parole conditions that support the goals of the parole board or agency and evidence-based principles and practices, and violation decisionmaking.

Core Competencies: A Resource for Parole Board Chairs, Members, and Executive Staff Cover

New parole board members and parole executives should read this publication. It “examines information emerging from research on evidence-based practice and decisionmaking in parole and the implications of these findings for paroling authorities” (p. viii). Five chapters comprise this document: evidence-based policy, practice, and decisionmaking—what it is and why paroling authorities should be interested in it; significant research findings regarding risk reduction—implications for paroling authorities; reaching the full recidivism reduction potential—using a systemwide approach to evidence-based decisionmaking; evaluating the research—how much evidence in enough; and the benefits of an evidence-based approach and recommendations for action—why pursue an evidence-based approach.

Evidence-Based Policy, Practice, and Decisionmaking: Implications for Paroling Authorities Cover

The purpose of this technical assistance request was to assist the Kansas Parole Board with reducing the num-ber of offenders revoked from post-release supervision and  with  streamlining  the  revocation  process  so  that  offenders spend less time incarcerated. The recommen-dations  below  are  made  for  the  purpose  of  assisting  the  Board  with  the  aforementioned  tasks.  In  suggest-ing  ways  the  Parole  Board  may  achieve  these  two  objectives,  we  draw  upon  current  research  and  best  practices in the field community corrections, as well as the  project  teams’  collective  experience  working  with  supervising  agencies.  We  provide  these  suggestions  after  a  thorough  review  of  the  interviews  conducted  with the Board and parole managers, survey responses to  the  parole  officer  survey,  and  a  review  of  the  stat-utes, and internal policy and procedure manuals used by  the  Kansas  parole  agency.  The  recommendations  are presented as a series of suggestions with the under-standing that the Board members and parole field staff are in the best position to decide which suggestions are feasible and most beneficial to adopt.  

The purpose of this technical assistance request was to assist the Kansas Parole Board with reducing the num-ber of offenders revoked from post-release supervision and  with  streamlining  the  revocation  process  so  that  offenders spend less time incarcerated. The recommen-dations  below  are  made  for  the  purpose  of  assisting  the  Board  with  the  aforementioned  tasks.  In  suggest-ing  ways  the  Parole  Board  may  achieve  these  two  objectives,  we  draw  upon  current  research  and  best  practices in the field community corrections, as well as the  project  teams’  collective  experience  working  with  supervising  agencies.  We  provide  these  suggestions  after  a  thorough  review  of  the  interviews  conducted  with the Board and parole managers, survey responses to  the  parole  officer  survey,  and  a  review  of  the  stat-utes, and internal policy and procedure manuals used by  the  Kansas  parole  agency.  The  recommendations  are presented as a series of suggestions with the under-standing that the Board members and parole field staff are in the best position to decide which suggestions are feasible and most beneficial to adopt.  

The use of discretionary parole has increased dramatically. 

Individuals involved in making sure their parole agency’s goals are being met need to read this paper. It provides guidance for a paroling authority in “defining its vision and mission, assembling information and resources to accomplish its goals, and putting into place appropriate management and performance measurement systems to carry out its objectives and measure its progress” (p. v). Six chapters are contained in this publication: craft your vision and mission statements; assess your organization’s current operating practices; engage key partners; plan and take strategic action; review information and manage for results; and conclusion.

Paroling Authorities’ Strategic Planning and Management for Results Cover

This guide is designed to “lay out the context, summarize the key issues, highlight the recent research, and provide suggestions about where to find more extensive and detailed resources” about special populations parole boards may have contact with (p. xiii). Seven chapters are contained in this publication: sex offenders; offenders who have significant mental health concerns; offenders who have significant substance abuse problems; women offenders; aging or geriatric offenders; youthful/juvenile offenders in the adult correctional system; and the challenges of housing for offenders released from prison.

Special Challenges Facing Parole Cover

“This paper provides suggestions and examples about how these key decisionmaking functions of parole [which offenders participate in which programs, when, and for how long] can be shaped to target resources effectively according to the principles of risk, need, and responsivity” (p. viii). Sections of this publication include: introduction; historical context; the cusp of change; parole at the crossroads; resources to support parole’s new role; targets of excellence in paroling authority decisionmaking; specific steps paroling authorities can take to enhance their ability to provide “targeting”; policy-driven parole decisionmaking—individual and team excellence; and conclusion.

The Future of Parole as a Key Partner in Assuring Public Safety Cover
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