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Resources on Justice Involved Women - Substance Abuse & Behavioral Health

Data continues to show that women are entering the justice system at rates exceeding male offenders and bring with them extremely complex and multi-layered behavioral and physical health issues. While systems must make choices on how best to deploy limited staffing and programming resources, this broadcast series is an opportunity to explore methods of coordination between behavioral and physical health care. This broadcast is the 2nd offering in a two part series addressing health related issues with women in our nation’s justice systems. On August 15, 2012 the first in the two-part series “Health, Justice and Women: Transforming Systems—Changing Lives” was aired and explored research, strategies and resources designed to effect health care practices with justice-involved women.

This broadcast “Health, Justice, Women: Behavioral Health and Ob/Gyn,” held on February 20, 2013, will take a closer look at areas introduced in the first broadcast with a focus specifically on the complexities of behavioral, obstetrical and gynecological issue that impact all women in our justice systems. Through short lecture, slides, video, interviews, practical vignettes and introduction of a broad array of resources, we will address behavioral health issues and initiate discussion around ob/gyn issues that impact women through their lifespan but that often create broad challenges to our agencies. As part of those discussions, we will spend some time on reproductive health issues to include pre and post-partum issues as well as the use of restraints during pregnancy.

During this discussion, participants will: Explore how research from the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study, the National Prevention Strategy (NPS), and others can inform correctional health practices for justice-involved women; Explore models in correctional settings of evidence-based behavioral and women’s health services; Identify how professional health care organizations continue to contribute to correctional health care for women; and Initiate agency-based conversations regarding creation of and/or enhancement of health care practices for women. Also included are the PowerPoint slides from the presentation and the Participant Guide.

Health, Justice, Women: Behavioral Health and OB/GYN [Internet Broadcast] Cover
Health, Justice, Women: Behavioral Health and OB/GYN - Part 1 [Internet Broadcast]

Data continues to show that women are entering the justice system at rates exceeding male offenders and bring with them extremely complex and multi-layered behavioral and physical health issues. While systems must make choices on how best to deploy limited staffing and programming resources, this broadcast series is an opportunity to explore methods of coordination between behavioral and physical health care. This broadcast is the 2nd offering in a two part series addressing health related issues with women in our nation’s justice systems. On August 15, 2012 the first in the two-part series “Health, Justice and Women: Transforming Systems—Changing Lives” was aired and explored research, strategies and resources designed to effect health care practices with justice-involved women.

This broadcast “Health, Justice, Women: Behavioral Health and Ob/Gyn,” held on February 20, 2013, will take a closer look at areas introduced in the first broadcast with a focus specifically on the complexities of behavioral, obstetrical and gynecological issue that impact all women in our justice systems. Through short lecture, slides, video, interviews, practical vignettes and introduction of a broad array of resources, we will address behavioral health issues and initiate discussion around ob/gyn issues that impact women through their lifespan but that often create broad challenges to our agencies. As part of those discussions, we will spend some time on reproductive health issues to include pre and post-partum issues as well as the use of restraints during pregnancy.

During this discussion, participants will: Explore how research from the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study, the National Prevention Strategy (NPS), and others can inform correctional health practices for justice-involved women; Explore models in correctional settings of evidence-based behavioral and women’s health services; Identify how professional health care organizations continue to contribute to correctional health care for women; and Initiate agency-based conversations regarding creation of and/or enhancement of health care practices for women. Also included are the PowerPoint slides from the presentation and the Participant Guide.

Health, Justice, Women: Behavioral Health and OB/GYN [Internet Broadcast] Cover
Health, Justice, Women: Behavioral Health and OB/GYN - Part 2 [Internet Broadcast]

This report—aimed at inspiring conversations about how to stop growing numbers of women cycling through U.S. jails—examines the existing research on how women come to and experience incarceration’s front door and its lasting consequences.

In an effort to provide more evidence-based and supportive programming for women in the local jail and those transitioning to the community, Maricopa County sought technical assistance from the National Resource Center on Justice Involved Women, a project funded by BJA, in partnership with the National Institute of Corrections (NIC).  In this technical assistance project, the NRCJIW designed and delivered a series of multidisciplinary training events for staff, as well as others working with justice-involved women in Maricopa County; and provided project staff with additional written and electronic resources relevant to their work with justice-involved women.

Dr. Vincent Felitti, a noted physician and researcher on the negative impacts of adverse childhood experiences on adults.

Background Mobile technology holds promise as a recovery tool for people with substance use disorders. However, some populations who may benefit the most may not have access to or experience with mobile phones. Incarcerated women represent a group at high risk for recidivism and relapse to substance abuse. Cost-effective mechanisms must be in place to support their recovery upon release. This study explores using mobile technology as a recovery management tool for women offenders residing in the community following release from jail. Subjects and Methods: This study surveyed 325 minority women offenders with substance use disorders to determine whether or not they use cell phones, their comfort with texting and search features, and the social networks that they access from mobile phones. Results: We found that 83% of survey subjects had cell phones; 30% of those were smartphones. Seventy-seven percent of the women reported access to supportive friends, and 88% had close family members they contacted regularly using mobile technology. Results indicated that most of the women were comfortable using a mobile phone, although the majority of them had prepaid minutes rather than plans, and most did currently use smartphones or have the capability to download applications or access social networks via their phones. Most women reported that they would be comfortable using a mobile phone to text, e-mail, and answer surveys. Conclusions: The high rate of adoption of mobile technology by women offenders makes them a promising target for recovery support delivered via mobile phone.

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