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Motivational interviewing (MI) helps clients become less ambivalent about altering their maladaptive behaviors. This publication presents “scenarios that agents commonly encounter in their efforts to monitor and reinforce court/parole/institutional conditions and address clients’ central eight criminogenic needs. This book also considers the learning tasks of MI in relation to the eight principles for effective interventions outlined in Implementing Evidence-Based Practice in Community Corrections: The Principles of Effective Intervention, an NIC publication. Ordered in the sequence in which they are most commonly learned or mastered, the first five of these eight tasks for learning MI provide the structure for Exercises for Developing MI Skills in Corrections.” Chapters relating to these five tasks are: the spirit of motivational interviewing; active listening; recognizing and reinforcing change talk; eliciting and strengthening change talk; and responding to resistance. A glossary of related terms is also included.

Exercises for Developing MI Skills in Corrections Cover

This publication "provides probation and parole officers and other correctional professionals with both a solid grounding in the principles behind MI [motivational interviewing] and a practical guide for applying these principles in their everyday dealings with offenders" (p.2). Seven chapters are contained in this guide: how MI fits in with evidence-based practice; how and why people change; the motivational interviewing style; preparing for change; building motivation for change; navigating through tough times--working with deception, violations, and sanctions; and from start to finish--putting MI into practice.

Motivating Offenders to Change: A Guide for Probation and Parole Cover

Motivational Interviewing (MI) was introduced to the field of corrections in the 1990s through the Evidence-based Practices (EBP) Model as a method for enhancing intrinsic motivation. Since that time, agencies throughout the U.S., in all criminal justice settings, have—to a greater or lesser degree—explored if, when, and how to implement this approach to communicating, building rapport, and tapping into the internal motivation of the clients and staff members they work with. This annotated bibliography contains the written resources pertaining specifically to the criminal justice field. In addition, certain documents considered seminal to the training, implementation, evaluation, coaching, and quality assurance of MI skills are included.

Motivational Interviewing (with a Criminal Justice Focus) Motivational Interviewing Annotated Bibliography Cover

This guide explains how to implement motivational interviewing (MI) in correctional settings. Motivational Interviewing is a counseling technique that enables people to get beyond their reluctance to change problem behaviors. MI is directive (focused on goals), client-centered, and non-confrontational. The first four chapters of this guide “address background and fundamental issues related to agency or systemwide implementation of MI … [while the last two chapters] address agency issues, such as organizational norms, mental models, and leadership styles that can significantly affect the success of MI implementation” (p. 5). These chapters are: what MI is; how MI is learned; supervising and coaching to support implementation; assessing motivational interviewing skills; and planning to help individuals develop MI skills in a correctional setting. A glossary is also included.

Motivational Interviewing in Corrections: A Comprehensive Guide to Implementing MI in Corrections Cover
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