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Results from a survey "designed to obtain information on the procedures used to classify high-risk inmates, particularly those in protective custody or administrative segregation, and inmates with mental illness or medical problems" are presented (p. xvi). Six chapters follow an executive summary:

  • Introduction;
  • Overview of risk assessment;
  • Risk assessment systems and instruments;
  • Findings of the National Survey of the Management of High-Risk Inmates;
  • Identification and review of model programs;
  • And issues and recommendations.

 

Classification of High-Risk and Special Management Prisoners: A National Assessment of Current Practices Cover

Prison systems experience continued pressure to house offenders in the most appropriate setting possible. While most correctional systems have implemented objective classification systems that have become quite effective in identifying inmates for the general prison population, less attention has been given to accurately classifying inmates who pose a higher risk and may require special management within the prison setting. This satellite/Internet training program will report on a study conducted over the past 2 years to increase knowledge on classification, programming, and supervision for high-risk offenders in the prison setting. Specifically, the broadcast will address the identification and selection process for high-risk and special management inmates, standards for their conditions of confinement, staffing issues, and release and re-entry issues.

Classification of High-Risk Offenders Cover

Findings from a telephone assessment of state and federal practices for classifying women offenders are presented. In addition to an executive summary, this report has the following chapters:

  • Introduction;
  • Issues in classifying women offenders -- the literature;
  • Approach;
  • Findings;
  • And discussion.

Most states still apply a male-based classification system to women.

 

Classification of Women Offenders:  A National Assessment of Current Practices Cover

In order to enable correctional administrators to anticipate further improvements in objective classification, this bulletin provides a summary of current critical classification issues. Topics briefly discussed include: re-evaluation of existing prison classification systems; external and internal classification; classification systems for women inmates; identification of high risk and special management inmates; the use of classification for reentry and inmate transition programs; the impact of longer prison terms; using classification for planning purposes; and the need for on-going research and evaluation of classification practices.

Critical Issues and Developments in Prison Classification Cover

A report which highlights the results of two cooperative agreements from the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) addressing the critical need for gender-specific objective classification systems is presented.  Following an executive summary are six chapters: introduction; classification issues for women offenders--the literature; NIC Prisons Division--women's classification initiatives (e.g., National Assessment of Current Practices for Classifying Women Offenders and Working With Correctional Agencies to Improve Classification for Women Offenders); building blocks to effective classification of women offenders; addressing classification issues that require systemic change; and future steps.  This report also has two appendixes: descriptions of seven states women's classification initiatives (Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Nebraska, West Virginia, and Wisconsin); and sample initial and reclassification instruments developed by Colorado and Idaho.

Developing Gender-Specific Classification Systems for Women Offenders Cover

The effects of information technology (IT) and computation developments on prison classification productivity are examined (p. vi). Ten chapters follow an executive summary: current status of MIS (management information system) support for prison classification brief review; MIS software, IT and classification productivity; offender classification roles and data requirements; automated prison classification system features and functions; software design principles and the user interface; evaluating classification MIS; integrating criminal justice system MISs; new directions in classification factors and information content; advances in analytical capacities of IT to strengthen prison classification; and implementing new technology and managing change. Appendixes contain general inmate processing procedures for Department of Correction(s) (or Correctional Services) in Washington, Florida, New Jersey, North Carolina, South Carolina, New York, and Colorado.

Enhancing Prison Classification Systems: The Emerging Role of Management Information Systems Cover

New information and knowledge learned regarding classification and risk assessment systems are reviewed. Topics discussed include: differences between prison classification and public risk assessment; differences between external and internal prison classification systems; standards in evaluating prisoner classification and other risk assessment instruments; the logic of prisoner classification systems; issues in reliability; issues in validity; factors associated with misconduct; impact of prison management and environment; and the need to link prison classification, risk assessment, and release decisions.

Findings in Prison Classification and Risk Assessment Cover

The development, implementation, impact assessment, and refinement of objective internal classification systems are examined. In addition to an executive summary, this report contains three chapters: introduction; description of the states' internal classification initiatives (Connecticut, Colorado, Washington, Oregon, Florida, New Jersey, South Dakota, and Missouri); and common problems, issues, and solutions. Appendixes include: Checklist for the Analysis of Life History of Adult Offenders (CALH) from MDOC; MDOC Correctional Adjustment Checklist; and IDOC Internal Classification Form for Maximum Security Facilities.

Internal Prison Classification Systems:  Case Studies in Their Development and Implementation Cover

Objective jail classification (OJC) is a process of assessing every jail inmate's custody and program needs and is considered one of the most important management tools available to jail administrators and criminal justice system planners. An effective system of inmate classification will reduce escapes and escape attempts, suicides and suicide attempts, and inmate assaults. OJC systems use locally developed and validated instruments, one at intake and another after a period of confinement, that identify the level of risk and needs presented by an inmate so that appropriate housing and program assignments can be made. The data generated through the classification process can also be used for operational, management, and planning purposes. This guide to OJC is intended for both jail administrators and other officials involved in local criminal justice system issues. It discusses key components of an OJC system, including instruments that use reliable and valid criteria, overrides by classification staff, staff training and commitment to OJC, and a housing plan that is consistent with classification outcomes. The author outlines specific aspects of system implementation, automation, monitoring, and evaluation of OJC systems. Policy implications and recommendations are also discussed.

Objective Jail Classification Systems: A Guide for Jail Administrators Cover

Classification systems help minimize the potential for prison violence, escape, and institutional misconduct. During the past three decades, correctional system administrators and researchers worked assiduously to improve their approaches to classifying and housing incarcerated individuals according to their custody, work, and programming needs. These efforts have refined and validated the criteria for custody decisions, increased the reliability of custody decisions, reduced over-classification, enhanced assessment of institutional program needs, and reduced institutional violence.

This publication is an update to NIC's previous Objective Prison Classification (2004). The second edition includes updates to critical areas, including the classification of women in prison and evaluating current classification systems. Following a brief discussion defining the essential components of an effective classification system, the guide walks through the four phases of effective classification system development: mobilization, assessment, planning, and implementation. The guide concludes with a discussion of special topics and implications for the future.

 

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