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Bogue, Brad

This article looks at the Colorado’s EBP Project for Implementation Capacity (EPIC). “EPIC is a pilot demonstration project to test the efficacy of implementation strategies, especially ones for improving corrections’ capacity for implementing EBPs. This project emphasizes building capacity to implement by focusing on developing a certain set of skills within a select set of staff in 17 different corrections organizations. The skills emphasized are offender assessment, cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) coaching and MI. MI was selected as the primary innovation and EBP to roll out in the local pilot agencies because its applications are ubiquitous and criteria for MI fidelity are clearly established and can be monitored with adequate planning and resources” (p. 50). Sections of this publication include: project background—skills, roles, motivation, socio-technical environment, and traits; three strategies of the EPIC Staff Development System—collaborative engagement, scaffolding skills and mastery, and new norms and organizational practices that empower staff and promote transparency; MITI-3 (Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity) thresholds for MI (motivational interviewing) competency; organizational transparency; and conclusion.

EBP: The Implications of Supervision: Strategies for Improving Corrections' Capacity for Implementing EBPs: The Colorado EBP Project for Implementation Capacity (EPIC) Staff Development System Cover

Motivational interviewing (MI) helps clients become less ambivalent about altering their maladaptive behaviors. This publication presents “scenarios that agents commonly encounter in their efforts to monitor and reinforce court/parole/institutional conditions and address clients’ central eight criminogenic needs. This book also considers the learning tasks of MI in relation to the eight principles for effective interventions outlined in Implementing Evidence-Based Practice in Community Corrections: The Principles of Effective Intervention, an NIC publication. Ordered in the sequence in which they are most commonly learned or mastered, the first five of these eight tasks for learning MI provide the structure for Exercises for Developing MI Skills in Corrections.” Chapters relating to these five tasks are: the spirit of motivational interviewing; active listening; recognizing and reinforcing change talk; eliciting and strengthening change talk; and responding to resistance. A glossary of related terms is also included.

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Outcome and process measures used to gage the effectiveness of the Integrated Model in reducing offender recidivism are presented. Each component found within a measure has information regarding its definition, tool/data source, description, frequency, and individual who collects the data. Components are organized into the following measures: recidivism; risk; proxy risk; supervision length; dosage; revocation and violation; program effectiveness; assessment; case plan; workload; violations; organizational climate; and collaboration.

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Principles of effective evidence-based intervention are presented. Topics discussed include: evidence-based practice (EBP); term clarification; eight principles for effective interventions -- assess actuarial risk/needs, enhance intrinsic motivation, target interventions, skill train with directed practice, increase positive reinforcement, engage ongoing support in natural communities, measure relevant processes/practices, and provide measurement feedback; components of correctional interventions; implementing EBP principles; applying the principles at the case, agency, and system levels; seven recommended strategies for implementing effective interventions; and levels of research evidence.

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<p>"The program interviews Bradford Bogue, Director of Justice System, Assessment and Training and a motivational interviewer trainer since 1993 and Anjali Nandi, Program Director of the Center for Change. She has been a member of the International Motivational Interviewing Network of Trainers since 2003. Both coauthored a document for the National Institute of Corrections titled Motivational Interviewing in Corrections: A Comprehensive Guide to Implementing MI in Corrections at https://nicic.gov/motivational-interviewing-corrections-comprehensive-gu...

This guide explains how to implement motivational interviewing (MI) in correctional settings. Motivational Interviewing is a counseling technique that enables people to get beyond their reluctance to change problem behaviors. MI is directive (focused on goals), client-centered, and non-confrontational. The first four chapters of this guide “address background and fundamental issues related to agency or systemwide implementation of MI … [while the last two chapters] address agency issues, such as organizational norms, mental models, and leadership styles that can significantly affect the success of MI implementation” (p. 5). These chapters are: what MI is; how MI is learned; supervising and coaching to support implementation; assessing motivational interviewing skills; and planning to help individuals develop MI skills in a correctional setting. A glossary is also included.

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