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Clark, Sean

Do you want to develop a better understanding of the veteran-specific resources available to both criminal justice agencies and to veterans? Would you like to improve your knowledge of the support available to criminal justice agencies to help build veterans’ programming? Veterans transitioning from the military to the civilian world may have unique underlying conditions, such as post-traumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and other veteran-specific mental health concerns.  If veterans with these conditions get involved with the criminal justice system, it can result in complex and challenging situations. Fortunately, there are veteran-specific resources available for use throughout the justice system continuum.  Agencies that recognize the distinctive qualities associated with military service and the abundant resources available to those who have served can significantly foster future success for these veterans as they navigate the criminal justice system and return to being productive members of society. Veteran-specific resources are being used by the field and are helping agencies with their programmatic efforts to help reduce recidivism for justice-involved veterans, improve public safety, and improve outcomes for veterans. 

Learning Objectives:

  • During this 90-minute interactive webinar, participants will:
  • Develop an understanding of resources available to veterans and criminal justice agencies;
  • Learn about outreach, assessment, referral, and links to services and how to partner with federal agencies to build programs for veterans.
  • Get tips on how to request technical assistance and access resources from the National Institute of Corrections.

Original broadcast: November 9, 2021 10am PT / 11am MT / 12pm CT / 1pm ET for 90 minutes.

 

This program on justice-involved veterans, highlights the lifesaving role being played by veterans treatment courts (VTCs) across the country.

From WWII through the continuing global war on terror, there are approximately 21.5 million veterans in the U.S. today. So many of these men, and increasingly women, return home damaged mentally and physically from their time in service. These wounds often contribute to their involvement in the criminal justice system. As a result, veterans are overrepresented in our jails and prisons.

For these justice-involved vets, Veterans Treatment Courts are providing a pathway to recovery so that they can be restored to functioning and contributing members of society.

Veterans Treatment Courts, or VTCs, provide hope, restore families and save lives. The first VTC, founded in 2008 in Buffalo, New York, has inspired the creation of more than 220 courts of similar nature in jurisdictions, both large and small, across the country. Hundreds more are in various stages of planning and implementation.

These courts have the support of the communities they serve, as well as the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and local service providing agencies. Critical to the success of VTCs are veterans who volunteer to be trained and serve as mentors to justice-involved veterans.

This training program will: Introduce Veterans Treatment Courts as an effective intervention and an alternative to incarceration for justice-involved veterans; Identify the unique issues which contribute to veterans’ involvement in the criminal justice system at the local, state and federal levels; Highlight the inception of Veterans Treatment Courts and the role they play in improving public safety, reducing recidivism, saving taxpayer dollars and, most importantly, restoring the lives of those who have served our country; Showcase model Veterans Treatment Court Programs, including Veterans Peer Mentor Programs; Demonstrate how to implement and sustain an effective VTC, including the vital role of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and Veteran Peer Mentors; and Provide resources and next steps for jurisdictions interested in implementing a Veterans Treatment Court or looking to improve an existing program.

Veterans Treatment Courts cover
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