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Fred Osher

“This white paper presents a shared framework for reducing recidivism and behavioral health problems among individuals under correctional control or supervision—that is, for individuals in correctional facilities or who are on probation or parole. The paper is written for policymakers, administrators, and practitioners committed to making the most effective use of scarce resources to improve outcomes for individuals with behavioral health problems who are involved in the corrections system. It is meant to provide a common structure for corrections and treatment system professionals to begin building truly collaborative responses to their overlapping service population. These responses include both behind-the-bars and community-based interventions. This framework is designed to achieve each system’s goals and ultimately to help millions of individuals rebuild their lives while on probation or after leaving prison or jail” (p. viii). Three parts follow an introduction regarding the need for a framework intended for coordinating services across systems: current responses to individuals with mental health and substance use disorders and corrections involvement—mental health treatment, substance abuse treatment, mental health and substance use appearing together, corrections—custody, control, and supervision, screening and assessment, the relationship between behavioral health needs and criminogenic risk/need—assembling the parts, and closing thoughts on RNR (risk-need-responsivity); the framework—strong foundations, criminogenic risk and behavior health needs, application to resource allocation and individual case responses, and goal for the framework’s use; and operationalizing the framework and next steps.

Adults with Behavioral Health Needs Under Correctional Supervision: A Shared Framework for Reducing Recidivism and Promoting Recovery Cover

The Behavioral Health Framework developed to “help professionals in the corrections and behavioral health systems take a coordinated approach to reducing recidivism and advancing recovery” is explained (p. 2). Sections of this publication cover: building effective partnerships through a shared vision; health care reform and opportunities for expanded access to behavioral health services; prioritizing enrollment to facilitate transition; the risk-need-responsivity (RNR) model; implications for successful transition and reentry; Guidelines 1 and 2—Assess; Guidelines 3 and 4—Plan; Guidelines 5 and 6—Identify; and Guidelines 7 through 10—Coordinate. Appendixes to this document are: “Evidence-Based Practices and Programs for Individuals with Behavioral Health Needs in the Criminal Justice System”; and “Information Sharing in the Criminal Justice-Behavioral Health Context: HIPAA and 42 CFR”.

Guidelines for the Successful Transition of People with Behavioral Health Disorders from Jail and Prison Cover

"This report introduces essential elements for responding to people with mental illnesses at the pretrial stage, including decisions about pretrial release and diversion. These elements encourage data collection not only to help individual communities, but also for future researchers who are dedicated to these important questions."

Improving Responses to People with Mental Illnesses at the Pretrial Stage Cover

“This report articulates 10 essential elements for all probation interventions that involve people with mental illnesses, regardless of the particular program model” (p. vii). The essential elements are: collaborative planning and administration; defining, identifying, and assessing a target population; designing the initiative and matching individuals to supervision and treatment options; setting conditions of community supervision; developing an individualized case plan; providing or linking to treatment and services; supporting adherence to conditions of community supervision and case plans; providing specialized training and cross-training; sharing information and maintaining confidentiality; and conducting evaluations and ensuring sustainability.

Improving Responses to People with Mental Illnesses: The Essential Elements of Specialized Probation Initiatives Cover

"This webinar explains and clarifies the issues related to allowable uses of federal Medicaid funds for incarcerated individuals, and provides an example of how corrections departments can leverage cost savings as a result. The discussion focuses on the challenges related to implementation and establishment of cross-agency collaboration, and the subsequent successes and cost savings that can be achieved." The agenda of this webinar is: "Introduction" by Fred Osher; "Financing Health Care for Individuals Involved in the Criminal Justice System" by Gabrielle de la Gueronniere; "An Introduction to Medicaid Eligibility and the Application Process" by Terri L. Catlett, Larry Huggins, and William Appel; and "Moderated Q&A Session" moderated by Osher.

Maximizing Medicaid: An Innovative Approach to Finance Health Care for Criminal Justice Populations [Webinar] Cover

“One of the biggest challenges for drug courts is effectively working with participants with co-occurring disorders. By definition, persons with the dual diagnosis of both substance use disorders and mental illnesses have co-occurring disorders … every adult drug court can achieve positive outcomes for persons with co-occurring disorders—if the court is committed to doing so. With some creativity and thoughtful planning, most persons with co-occurring disorders can successfully participate in drug courts” (p. 1). This publication explains very clearly how to ensure this by utilizing six critical steps. Topics covered include: three treatment court models; the need for flexibility; overlapping populations; step 1—know who your participants are and what they need by using the quadrant model, screening, and assessment; step 2—adapt your court structure; step 3--expand your treatment options; step 4--target your case management and community supervision; step 5—expand mechanisms for collaboration; and step 6—educate your team.

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