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Morgan, Marcia

Good correctional practice includes applying principles of risk based classification to all adult and juvenile offenders while accounting for unique characteristics and concerns of LGBTI and gender non-conforming populations. To ensure a culture of safety, it is important to identify these individuals at intake. A culture of safety includes everyone understanding and practicing respectful, appropriate and professional language.

Intake personnel function as the “gatekeepers” for correctional systems and facilities and are a critical component in the information gathering process. If information obtained at intake is inaccurate or misleading, it can have dire consequences and impact safety. Staff must have clear guidelines allowing for the consistent identification of LGBTI offenders and the collection of key information. Establishing good communication at intake is essential to obtain the necessary information for appropriate housing, medical and mental health referrals, programs, security level, and services in the community. During this broadcast we will demonstrate effective and professional communication with LGBTI offenders during intake and make recommendations to improve the intake process.

Using a variety of methods including on-air discussions and activities, demonstrations and skills practice, this two-day six-hour interactive training broadcast is designed to: establish the relevance of initial information-gathering and how it impacts LGBTI populations from intake to successful reentry; provide recommendations and good correctional practice examples to ensure a culture of respect and safety at intake for LGBTI populations and correctional staff; and provide practical examples and demonstrate professional communication with LGBTI populations at intake.

LGBTI Populations: Intake – Creating a Culture of Safety [Internet Broadcast] Cover

“The intent of the curriculum is to provide prisons, jails, community confinement, and juvenile detention facilities with specialized training for medical and mental health personnel on specific aspects of Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA). Specifically, this curriculum provides training on how to detect and assess signs of sexual abuse, preserve physical evidence, and respond effectively and professionally to victims.

“The intended audience is health professionals. This includes but is not limited to physicians, psychologists, nurses, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, health administrators, social workers, and other professionals who provide, support, or administer health care services in correctional environments.

“The curriculum contains four modules and should take four hours to complete, including breaks and time for questions. All modules are considered essential: Facilitators guide; Introduction (10 minutes); Module 1: Detecting and Assessing Signs of Sexual Abuse and Harassment (55 minutes); Module 2: Reporting and the PREA Standards (50 minutes); Module 3: Effective and Professional Responses (30 minutes); [and] Module 4: The Medical Forensic Examination and Forensic Evidence Preservation (60 minutes).”

Specialized Training: PREA Medical and Mental Care Standards Cover
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