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Osher, Fred

The Behavioral Health Framework developed to “help professionals in the corrections and behavioral health systems take a coordinated approach to reducing recidivism and advancing recovery” is explained (p. 2). Sections of this publication cover: building effective partnerships through a shared vision; health care reform and opportunities for expanded access to behavioral health services; prioritizing enrollment to facilitate transition; the risk-need-responsivity (RNR) model; implications for successful transition and reentry; Guidelines 1 and 2—Assess; Guidelines 3 and 4—Plan; Guidelines 5 and 6—Identify; and Guidelines 7 through 10—Coordinate. Appendixes to this document are: “Evidence-Based Practices and Programs for Individuals with Behavioral Health Needs in the Criminal Justice System”; and “Information Sharing in the Criminal Justice-Behavioral Health Context: HIPAA and 42 CFR”.

Guidelines for the Successful Transition of People with Behavioral Health Disorders from Jail and Prison Cover

"This webinar explains and clarifies the issues related to allowable uses of federal Medicaid funds for incarcerated individuals, and provides an example of how corrections departments can leverage cost savings as a result. The discussion focuses on the challenges related to implementation and establishment of cross-agency collaboration, and the subsequent successes and cost savings that can be achieved." The agenda of this webinar is: "Introduction" by Fred Osher; "Financing Health Care for Individuals Involved in the Criminal Justice System" by Gabrielle de la Gueronniere; "An Introduction to Medicaid Eligibility and the Application Process" by Terri L. Catlett, Larry Huggins, and William Appel; and "Moderated Q&A Session" moderated by Osher.

Maximizing Medicaid: An Innovative Approach to Finance Health Care for Criminal Justice Populations [Webinar] Cover

“One of the biggest challenges for drug courts is effectively working with participants with co-occurring disorders. By definition, persons with the dual diagnosis of both substance use disorders and mental illnesses have co-occurring disorders … every adult drug court can achieve positive outcomes for persons with co-occurring disorders—if the court is committed to doing so. With some creativity and thoughtful planning, most persons with co-occurring disorders can successfully participate in drug courts” (p. 1). This publication explains very clearly how to ensure this by utilizing six critical steps. Topics covered include: three treatment court models; the need for flexibility; overlapping populations; step 1—know who your participants are and what they need by using the quadrant model, screening, and assessment; step 2—adapt your court structure; step 3--expand your treatment options; step 4--target your case management and community supervision; step 5—expand mechanisms for collaboration; and step 6—educate your team.

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