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Patricia L. Hardyman

In order to enable correctional administrators to anticipate further improvements in objective classification, this bulletin provides a summary of current critical classification issues. Topics briefly discussed include: re-evaluation of existing prison classification systems; external and internal classification; classification systems for women inmates; identification of high risk and special management inmates; the use of classification for reentry and inmate transition programs; the impact of longer prison terms; using classification for planning purposes; and the need for on-going research and evaluation of classification practices.

Critical Issues and Developments in Prison Classification Cover

A report which highlights the results of two cooperative agreements from the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) addressing the critical need for gender-specific objective classification systems is presented.  Following an executive summary are six chapters: introduction; classification issues for women offenders--the literature; NIC Prisons Division--women's classification initiatives (e.g., National Assessment of Current Practices for Classifying Women Offenders and Working With Correctional Agencies to Improve Classification for Women Offenders); building blocks to effective classification of women offenders; addressing classification issues that require systemic change; and future steps.  This report also has two appendixes: descriptions of seven states women's classification initiatives (Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Nebraska, West Virginia, and Wisconsin); and sample initial and reclassification instruments developed by Colorado and Idaho.

Developing Gender-Specific Classification Systems for Women Offenders Cover

The development, implementation, impact assessment, and refinement of objective internal classification systems are examined. In addition to an executive summary, this report contains three chapters: introduction; description of the states' internal classification initiatives (Connecticut, Colorado, Washington, Oregon, Florida, New Jersey, South Dakota, and Missouri); and common problems, issues, and solutions. Appendixes include: Checklist for the Analysis of Life History of Adult Offenders (CALH) from MDOC; MDOC Correctional Adjustment Checklist; and IDOC Internal Classification Form for Maximum Security Facilities.

Internal Prison Classification Systems:  Case Studies in Their Development and Implementation Cover

Proceedings from this two-day national forum on classification and information system related problems are provided. Topics discussed include: linking all the pieces; external and internal classification; classification data for planning; linking DOC to local jails; prison internal classification systems; automated risk and needs; AICS - personality based model; managing high risk offenders; responding to litigation; winning classification systems -- Montana; responding to litigation -- Michigan; classification of women offenders; BOP's work with revalidation and classification of women offenders; a dynamic instrument for women; reentry -- linking prison classification to reentry to the community; reentry -- incarceration planning; and wrap-up and next steps. Appendixes include presenter bios and contact information for all of the participants.

Prison Classification Cover

Classification systems help minimize the potential for prison violence, escape, and institutional misconduct. During the past three decades, correctional system administrators and researchers worked assiduously to improve their approaches to classifying and housing incarcerated individuals according to their custody, work, and programming needs. These efforts have refined and validated the criteria for custody decisions, increased the reliability of custody decisions, reduced over-classification, enhanced assessment of institutional program needs, and reduced institutional violence.

This publication is an update to NIC's previous Objective Prison Classification (2004). The second edition includes updates to critical areas, including the classification of women in prison and evaluating current classification systems. Following a brief discussion defining the essential components of an effective classification system, the guide walks through the four phases of effective classification system development: mobilization, assessment, planning, and implementation. The guide concludes with a discussion of special topics and implications for the future.

 

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This manual provides guidance that “will enable an agency staffing administrator to set up an agency staffing analysis unit and produce a staffing analysis report for an entire agency” (p.xi). Chapters contained in this publication are: introduction -- correctional staffing issues; securing staff deployment policy; two models for managing the security staffing function; agency staffing unit; basic tasks of a staffing analysis; orchestrating the staffing analysis; agency and facility characteristics that influence staffing; operations and activities schedules that influence staffing; developing the shift relief factor; security post planning; special guidelines for evaluating housing units; the impact of staff scheduling on staffing; staffing calculations; developing a staffing report; implementing recommendations and monitoring results; staffing considerations for women’s correctional facilities; and staffing considerations for medical and mental health units. Pertinent forms are also included.

Prison Staffing Analysis:  A Training Manual with Staffing Considerations for Special Populations Cover

Tasks, assessments, and technology used in prisoner intake systems are examined. Following an executive summary, this report has seven chapters: introduction; national overview of facility characteristics, facility functions, intake components and personnel responsibilities, and obstacles to intake assessments; four chapters review select agency's corrections population, intake facilities, intake process, processing time and flexibility, classification, and needs assessment -- one chapter per Department of Correction(s) from Colorado, Washington (state), Pennsylvania, and North Carolina; and implications of the research. Appendixes include: "Admission Data Summary" and "Diagnostic Narrative Summary" forms (Colorado DOC); "Risk Management Identification Worksheet" form (Washington DOC); and Pennsylvania DOC "Classification Summary."

Prisoner Intake Systems: Assessing Needs and Classifying Prisoners Cover

Work undertaken by the participating states is described, an outline of the fundamental tasks required for a revalidation effort is provided, and external classification trends and lessons learned from these classification reforms are summarized within this report (p. x). This report is comprised of the following sections: executive summary; introduction; NIC classification goals and objectives; description of the ten states' external classification initiatives (Virginia, Montana, Oregon, Oklahoma, Texas, Wyoming, Wisconsin, Delaware, Rhode Island, and Tennessee); recommended methodology for testing, implementing, and monitoring classification reforms; and common issues, problems and solutions, and next steps. Appendixes provide copies of external classification instruments validated by select states and statistical tables.

Revalidating External Prison Cover
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