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Seymour, Anne

"While victims are not the primary client for you as a tribal probation officer [TPO], you are in a unique position to provide them with critical information and link them with services. This bulletin is designed to provide TPOs with a brief overview of victims’ rights, tips to help coordinate and improve the delivery of victim services, and information about the varied services available to victims of crime" (p. 3). Sections of this publication cover: why tribal probation officers should be concerned about crime victims; the impact of crime on victims; eight specific victims' rights under federal law; barriers to victim participation in criminal and tribal justice processes; victims' rights and related services—safety and reasonable protection, confidentiality, notification and information, participation, victim input, restitution and other legal/financial obligations (LFOs), and victim compensation; effective communication with victims; collaboration for victims' rights implementation and victim assistance services—federal victim services, tribal victim services, and state and local victim services; services for crime victims and survivors; National Information and Referral Resources for Crime Victim/Survivor Assistance—20 national toll-free information, assistance, and referral numbers; and victim/offender and restorative justice programs.

A Tribal Probation Officers Guide to Working with Victims cover

This three-hour national discussion and broadcast by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) focuses on the unique opportunities and challenges of including victims in the offender reentry process. Current points in the criminal justice reentry continuum where victims can and should have a voice are explored. By including victims we can obtain more balanced information about the offender and their offense history which can positively impact reentry decisions. This approach can result in better outcomes for the community, offenders and victims through enhanced offender accountability, increased victim satisfaction, and community safety.

During this program, presenters will: identify the value of involving victims throughout the offender reentry process, while ensuring victims’ rights are addressed; address corrections professionals concerns regarding interacting with victims and addressing issues of confidentiality; provide tips, tools and strategies for integrating victims into the reentry process; and identify resources, collaborative partnerships and funding opportunities for including victims in reentry programs.

Offender Reentry: The Value of Victim Involvement [Broadcast] cover

"Restorative justice [RJ] is a theory of justice that emphasizes repairing the harm caused by criminal behaviour. It is best accomplished through cooperative processes that include all stakeholders. This can lead to transformation of people, relationships and communities" (Center for Justice & Reconciliation). This webinar will provide: a brief overview of RJ principles and practices—traditional justice and RJ philosophies, RJ practices at a glance; findings from relevant research-- New Zealand Model, Durham NC Dispute Settlement Center, conferencing, law enforcement and prosecution, courts, and recidivism and RJ, and summary of RJ research findings,; reasons for adopting restorative justice—needs/wants of victims, what's in it for crime victims and services providers, law enforcement, prosecution, defense, judiciary, corrections, elected officials, and for all involved, top assets, and top obstacles.

Pulse Check: Restorative Justice Cover
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