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Stinchcomb, Jeanne B.

<p>Findings from a report which "assesses the outcome of the training [program] in terms of the leadership-related behaviors of participants" are presented (p. 4). This evaluation contains the following sections: executive summary; background; program description; research design; findings according to -- overview of participant training manual, analysis of participant program evaluations, on-site observations of researchers, focus group feedback, and survey results; and conclusions and recommendations. "Overall results clearly indicate an extremely positive endorsement of NIC's efforts" (p. 5)</p>

This bibliography describes 71 items that address workforce development problems faced by community corrections, probation, and parole agencies. Some of the topics discussed are: the changing workforce; the changing roles of staff; caseload management demands; and recruiting, hiring, training, developing, and retaining staff.

Community Corrections Cover

This guide "explores current and future workforce challenges facing community corrections" (p. xiii). Chapters contained in this guide are: rationale -- why now?; organizational culture -- moving from a "workplace" to a place where people want to work; recruitment -- looking in the right places for the right people; retention -- keeping the right people in the right places; and strategies for success -- getting started.

FutureForce: A Guide to Building the 21st Century Community Corrections Workforce Cover

The process by which it was determined what knowledge, skills, and abilities jail leaders should have in order to be successful at their jobs is explained. Those 22 identified competencies are described in detail. Sections of this report include: introduction; overview of the literature review; Advisory Committee deliberations; subsequent refinements; focus group sessions at national conferences; drilling-down to the KSAs; methods; outcomes for the core competencies and related charts; and summary and conclusions. It should be noted that “that the individual components of KSAs are so interrelated that one cannot occur without the other” (p. 18).

Identifying Core Competencies and Required Knowledge, Skills, and Abilities (KSAs) for Jail Leaders: Methods and Outcomes Cover

This article should be read by all jail administrators for it explains why the majority of line-level jail officers like their jobs and are not going to quit. Of course the jail setting must possess an encouraging organizational climate, make the staff feel fairly treated, encourage them to provide input during the decision making process, and foster positive relations between them and their supervisors. Meanwhile, while “the environmental variables investigated are amenable to change, it would appear that, with greater insights into these dynamic precursors of thoughts about quitting, jail administrators can develop strategic initiatives targeted toward proactively reducing the fiscal cost and intangible impact of voluntary turnover” (p. 226).

Should I Go Cover
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