Back to top

Corrections Today

"Many juvenile justice agencies and facilities express a sincere desire to treat LGBT youths in a fair and respectful way and to promote positive interactions between youths and between youths and staff. At the same time, many agencies are unsure of the appropriate steps to take in addressing this issue. This article provides some broad guidance for agency leadership in this area" (p. 100). Suggestions are made for the following operational concerns: policy development; intake screening; housing; searches and supervision; medical and mental health; staff training; and family services.

Ensuring the Safety of LGBT Youths in the Juvenile Justice System Cover

This article explains why mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs) can be effective in offender rehabilitation and reduce recidivism. Sections address: the program structure of MBIs in correctional settings in the U.S.; findings from controlled research studies in U.S. prisons; mindfulness as a reoffending reduction strategy resulting in improved "inmate levels of negative affect; substance use and drug-related self-control; anger and hostility; relaxation capacity; and self-esteem and optimism" (p. 50); and integration and rollout issues.

Mindfulness Meditation in American Correctional Facilities: A "What Works" Approach to Reducing Reoffending Cover

Results from an ongoing evaluation project on the effectiveness of offender workforce development (OWD) services are presented. “Drug and alcohol abuse and/or not continuing substance abuse treatment was identified as almost a universal barrier to post-release success” (p. 67). Those individuals that receive OWD services have a recidivism rate 33% lower than the comparison group.

Offender Workforce Development Services Makes an Impact Cover

If you or your agency wants or needs information about improving or creating and implementing a new reentry program, then attending this virtual conference is a must. “On June 12, 2013, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) will launch its first-ever virtual conference, “Cuff Key to Door Key: A Systems Approach to Reentry.” Topics covered during the conference will include mental health, sentencing, a review of successful reentry programs, Thinking for a Change (T4C), and a look at the challenges of reentry and transforming corrections culture. Edward Latessa, the interim dean and professor at the College of Education, Criminal Justice and Human Services at the University of Cincinnati, will deliver the keynote address” (p. 90). This article explains the reasoning behind the virtual conference, how to view it, and the complexities of successful reentry programming. This article is used with permission from the American Correctional Association. Any further reprinting, altering, copying, transmitting, or use in any way needs written permission from ACA.

conference image
Subscribe to Corrections Today