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American Probation and Parole Association (APPA) (Lexington, KY)

This document provides “conceptual information and practical tools to develop or enhance” an effective “proactive community supervision approach for domestic violence cases” (p.1). Ten Chapters follow a summary: what difference it makes; fundamentals for community corrections domestic violence practice -- types, causes, perpetrators, victims, and the justice system response to domestic violence; legal issues in the supervision of domestic violence offenders -- legal definitions, jurisdictional issues, civil protection orders, federal and state firearms laws, conditions of probation and pretrial release, enforcement and revocation, confidentiality, and related special issues; culture and domestic violence; core goals for implementing the guidelines -- goals (i.e., victim safety and autonomy, offender accountability, and offender intervention), autonomy and empowerment, practice principles, and inadvisable practices for domestic violence case supervision; guidelines for professional and ethical practice; guidelines for case investigation; guidelines for community supervision and enforcement; guidelines for victim safety and autonomy; and guidelines for batterer intervention programs.

Community Corrections Response to Domestic Violence:  Guidelines for Practice Cover

If you are a community corrections officer you should read this article. This article offers an efficient way to effectively monitor your supervisees’ computer use. Sections of this article cover: the issue of computer use and disuse by offenders such as gang members and sex offenders; the five major components of computer management—know what computer(s) the supervisee has or has access to, deciding how to monitor computer or Internet use, going online to check unauthorized use, using complementary technologies like location monitoring, and continued field visits; computer searches versus computer monitoring; and training. “The complexity and diversity of criminal and delinquent activities enabled and accelerated by technology can be daunting but that cannot be used as an excuse for a “wait and see” strategy. Expertise is developed over time and agencies are encouraged to start with the major components and to develop their expertise by focusing on specific strategies and offense types. Starting the process now will help prepare agencies for future challenges that will continue to occur as probationers or parolees find new and innovative ways to exploit developing technologies” (p. 46).

Managing the Risks Posed by Offender Computer Use: An APPA Technology Committee Issue Paper Cover

“The National Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA) Standards were released in 2012 to provide comprehensive guidance on the prevention, detection, and response to sexual abuse and violence within confinement settings across the country. Although the National PREA Standards do not specifically extend to tribal detention facilities, all confinement facilities, regardless of their obligations under PREA, are being held to a higher legal standard for the prevention of and response to sexual abuse and could potentially face increased civil penalties if they fail to do so. Further, enhancing the safety and security of facilities and inmates is a core mission for all corrections professionals, which includes protection against and prevention of sexual abuse. “Therefore, the National PREA Resource Center, in partnership with the American Probation and Parole Association, has produced the Preventing and Addressing Sexual Abuse in Tribal Detention Facilities: The Impact of the Prison Rape Elimination Act training curriculum to improve the capacity of tribal detention officers to adequately prevent and respond to incidents of sexual abuse within detention facilities in Indian Country. “The curriculum is designed specifically for tribal detention staff and affiliated organizations that interact with tribal detention facilities. Curriculum Modules and Training Materials: Instructors Manual; Presentation: Impact of PREA; [and Participant Guide. “The curriculum contains five modules and is intended to be delivered over the course of seven hours, not including breaks and lunch. The five modules are: Defining the Issue and Understanding PREA; Dynamics of Sexual Abuse, Violence, and Misconduct; Investigations and Legal Concerns; Review of PREA Standards; [and] Putting Into Practice What We Know.”

Preventing Addressing Cover

“The Principles report outlines ten operating guidelines that define highly-successful system-level responses to address the needs of drug involved individuals. And the needs are staggering – with estimates as high as 60 percent of arrestees in jail with positive drug tests and fragmented service networks in the highest need communities, the responsibility to treat and rehabilitate drug-involved defendants and offenders has fallen squarely on criminal justice systems. While some systems have had notable successes in meeting these challenges, others continue to struggle. Principles provides a roadmap for leaders and practitioners with guidance like how to identify how severe the substance use is among defendants and offenders, address the diagnosed drivers contributing to the substance abusing behavior, and how to determine the level of intervention based on severity of substance use and on risk to reoffend.” This publication contains sections about: the ten principles of an effective criminal justice response; risk, needs, and evidence-based responses; and moving from aspirational to operational.

Principles of an Effective Cover
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