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American Probation and Parole Association (APPA) (Lexington, VA)

"HIPAA (Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996) and 42 CFR Part 2 (Title 42: Public Health, Part 2—Confidentiality of Substance Abuse Patient Records) are two of the most commonly cited barriers to cross-domain information sharing" (p. 1). This brief takes the ten most common myths about justice-health information sharing and explains the realities behind them.

A Note on HIPAA and 42 CFR Part 2: Dispelling the Myths about Justice-Health Information Sharing Cover

"While victims are not the primary client for you as a tribal probation officer [TPO], you are in a unique position to provide them with critical information and link them with services. This bulletin is designed to provide TPOs with a brief overview of victims’ rights, tips to help coordinate and improve the delivery of victim services, and information about the varied services available to victims of crime" (p. 3). Sections of this publication cover: why tribal probation officers should be concerned about crime victims; the impact of crime on victims; eight specific victims' rights under federal law; barriers to victim participation in criminal and tribal justice processes; victims' rights and related services—safety and reasonable protection, confidentiality, notification and information, participation, victim input, restitution and other legal/financial obligations (LFOs), and victim compensation; effective communication with victims; collaboration for victims' rights implementation and victim assistance services—federal victim services, tribal victim services, and state and local victim services; services for crime victims and survivors; National Information and Referral Resources for Crime Victim/Survivor Assistance—20 national toll-free information, assistance, and referral numbers; and victim/offender and restorative justice programs.

A Tribal Probation Officers Guide to Working with Victims cover

"This resource was designed to enable correctional entities to comply with HIPAA and 42 CFR Part 2 in the receipt or sharing of PHI [public health information], whether the correctional entity meets HIPAA’s designation of a “covered entity,”17 is determined by 42 CFR Part 2 to be a “federally assisted program,”18 or does not meet either criteria. The tools within the resource may be used by any correctional entity interested in articulating its commitment to protecting PHI and implementing the components of a privacy framework." This publication is made up of three chapters: introduction; overview of HIPAA and 42 CFR Part 2 regulations—HIPAA regulations regarding medical and mental health information, and 42 CFR Part 2 regarding substance abuse information; and PHI policy development template. Appendixes include: glossary; listing of applicable federal laws; release of information—consent authorization guidance; contractual agreements; court orders; 42 CFR 2.22—Notice to Patients of Federal Confidentiality Requirements; PHI Privacy Policy Review Checklist; and standards and resource list.

Corrections and Reentry: Protected Health Information Privacy Framework for Information Sharing Cover

"From the creation of Victims Committees at ACA (1987), APPA (1991), and APAI (1992) and the establishment of the National Association of Victim Assistance in Corrections (NAVAC, formerly known as NAVSPIC) and the National Institute of Corrections Network of Post-Conviction Victim Service Providers, the field of corrections has recognized the importance of enforcing victims’ rights in the post-sentencing phases of their cases, and providing services and support to the victims and survivors of the offenders whom they detain and supervise.

"This document marks the first time that the leading national correctional agencies and organizations and their respective victim/survivor-related Committees have joined together on a project that we hope will enhance and promote corrections-based victim services. Outreach to our respective members contributed to these creative ideas about how correctional agencies can partner with victim assistance organizations to promote 2016 NCVRW in six categories: 1. Correctional clients’ fundraising for victim services; 2. Victim/survivor awareness and programming; 3. Correctional staff education; 4. Direct victim and community support; 5. Educational programs; [and] 6. Media relations and public awareness" (p. 1).

Creative Ideas for Institutional and Community Corrections Agencies to Partner with Crime Victim Assistance Organizations and Agencies to Promote 2016 National Crime Victims' Rights Week Cover

This article looks at the Colorado’s EBP Project for Implementation Capacity (EPIC). “EPIC is a pilot demonstration project to test the efficacy of implementation strategies, especially ones for improving corrections’ capacity for implementing EBPs. This project emphasizes building capacity to implement by focusing on developing a certain set of skills within a select set of staff in 17 different corrections organizations. The skills emphasized are offender assessment, cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) coaching and MI. MI was selected as the primary innovation and EBP to roll out in the local pilot agencies because its applications are ubiquitous and criteria for MI fidelity are clearly established and can be monitored with adequate planning and resources” (p. 50). Sections of this publication include: project background—skills, roles, motivation, socio-technical environment, and traits; three strategies of the EPIC Staff Development System—collaborative engagement, scaffolding skills and mastery, and new norms and organizational practices that empower staff and promote transparency; MITI-3 (Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity) thresholds for MI (motivational interviewing) competency; organizational transparency; and conclusion.

EBP: The Implications of Supervision: Strategies for Improving Corrections' Capacity for Implementing EBPs: The Colorado EBP Project for Implementation Capacity (EPIC) Staff Development System Cover

“Using effective strategies to keep probationers and parolees crime- and drug-free and curb their revocation rates is among the most important issues facing our community corrections supervision system … Based on solid research, two key strategies that many agencies have begun to implement are the use of swift, certain, and proportionate sanctions to respond to violations, and the use of incentives to promote and reinforce compliance among probationers and parolees” (p. 1-2). This report does a great job in explaining how to effectively combine both sanctions and incentives in probation and parole supervision. These tactics are: consider legal and constitutional issues; apply proper ration of incentives to sanctions; collaborate with key stakeholders; develop structured response grids using key principles; and evaluate program fidelity and outcomes. Also included are a “Response Grid Template” and a “Data Collection Elements” list.

Effective Responses to Offender Behavior: Lessons Learned from Probation and Parole Supervision Cover

Implementation of the Family Support Approach for Community Supervision is explained. This publication includes the following sections: introduction and overview; guiding principles for putting this system into practice; tools and techniques for putting this approach into practice; practical application of guiding principles; administrative support; and "The Oklahoma Family Justice Project: Improving Community Supervision Outcomes One Family at a Time" by Justin Jones and Carol Shapiro.

Implementing the Family Support Approach for Community Supervision Cover

Access to eight fact sheets “on topics related to crime victims and victims’ needs throughout the community corrections process” is provided. Topics covered are: The Role of Community Corrections in Victim Services; Collaboration and Partnership for Victim Services in Community Corrections; Family Violence; Restitution and Other Legal Financial Obligations; Seeking Victim Input; Victim Information and Notification; Victim/Offender Programs; and Workplace Violence.

Promising Victim Related Practices in Probation and Parole Fact Sheet Series Cover

“The goal of this training program is to provide community corrections officers with information on strategies they can use to enhance their interactions with and services to crime victims. By the conclusion of this training participants will be able to: describe the impacts and implications of crime on its victims; identify the specific rights of victims, and describe the role of community corrections staff in implementing victims’ rights; demonstrate skills for communicating effectively with crime victims; identify 4-5 approaches for obtaining victim impact statements, and 3-4 appropriate types of information to request through victim impact statements; list 4-5 points in the community corrections process that officers should provide notification to victims; [and] demonstrate 2-3 strategies for increasing restitution collection among supervisees. This 16-hour training program is made up of five modules: welcome and introductions; communicating effectively with crime victims; incorporating victim input throughout the community corrections process; victim notification; and enhancing restitution management and enforcement.

Promising Victim Related Practices in Probation and Parole: Training Curriculum [and] Participant Manual [Lesson Plans and Participants’ Manual] Cover

This is a great article explaining how and why community corrections officers experience traumatic stress on the job and related efforts to address this problem. Sections cover: stress—it comes with the job; number of primary traumatic incidents for officers—28% experience four or more incidents; secondary (indirect ) traumatic stress (STS) or compassion fatigue--symptoms and number experienced—44% of 3-4 symptoms; vicarious traumatization (VT) due to empathetic encounters with victimized individuals and number of incidents experienced—56% of 4 or more; corrections fatigue—symptoms and number experienced—67% of 5 or more; unintended negative consequences of evidence-based practices (EBPs) on trauma exposure; managing stress in the workplace; Maricopa County Adult Probation Department (MCAPD) pilot program to address the impact of trauma exposure; employee stress management model—pre-incident prevention strategies (i.e., Officer Specific Training, and Administration Specific Training), post-incident interventions (i.e., Critical Incident Stress Management (CISM) Team, Individual Crisis Intervention (ICI), and stress assessments), and the evaluation of pre/post measures; and author observations.

Secondary Trauma Cover

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