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Minnesota Department of Corrections (St. Paul, MN)

This guide will help offenders in determining where they are at in terms of preparing for release and in creating a plan to succeed once they leave prison. This handbook contains ten chapters: identification; life skills; housing; education; transportation; living under supervision; family; health; money management; and employment.

This is an in-depth interview with an expert at manipulating jail and prison staff. The candidness of the inmate makes this presentation very educational. Some of his observations include the following:

  • “If I can manipulate you into making my time easier, I’m gonna do it. That’s my job in here.”
  • “You might get a little money, but you’ll get caught.”
  • "Once he’s done with you, he’ll sell you out to another inmate or the authorities."
  • “It can’t happen if you don’t allow it to…It’s always about that initial response.” The root of every setup is personal information. That’s power for the inmate.
Avoiding Inmate Setups Cover

The influence visitation has on the recidivism of visited prisoners is examined. Sections of this report include: research summary; introduction; prison visitation policies; reentry and social support; prison visitation research; methodology; results for descriptive statistics, impact of visitation on time to first felony reconviction, impact of visitation on time to first revocation, and impact of inmate-visitor relationship on time to first reconviction; conclusion; and implications for correctional policy and practice. Visitation has a significant effect on recidivism. “Any visit reduced the risk of recidivism by 13 percent for felony reconvictions and 25 percent for technical violation revocations, which reflects the fact that visitation generally had a greater impact on revocations. The findings further showed that more frequent and recent visits were associated with a decreased risk of recidivism” (p. 27).

The Effects of Prison Visitation on Offender Recidivism Cover

This policy establishes the procedures defining how to collect and manage crime scene evidence. “All MCF-RC [Minnesota Correctional Facility - Rush City] staff must maintain the integrity and credibility of evidence to be used in disciplinary proceedings and/or criminal cases. Staff who confiscate contraband/evidence are responsible for it until they process it through the evidence procedures. The discipline unit must establish and maintain procedures for controlled access to evidence storage areas and make arrangements for the safe and secure disposal of evidence and contraband” (p. 1). Procedures cover: evidence collection; securing evidence--staff; evidence removal; securing evidence—discipline unit; checking out evidence; evidence disposal; and entry into the evidence room.

Title: Evidence Handling Cover
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