Back to top

National Institute of Corrections (NIC) (Washington, DC)

This presentation will increase the user's understanding of the risks associated with the use of restraints, tools to reduce risk, and the proper way to use restraints in custody. Issues discussed include:

  • Potential problems and concerns with the use of restraints;
  • Terminology, physiology, and medical risks associated with the application and use of restraints;
  • Planned and unplanned use of force;
  • The need for policy development, training, and monitoring;
  • Tools to reduce the risk for asphyxia and death;
  • The role and ethical limitations of medical and mental health problems;
  • And legal implications and liability.

 

Application and Use of Restraints Cover

“Previously, not many assessment tools looked at issues that specifically affect those who work in the field of corrections … [This book] presents three organizational assessment tools developed specifically for the field of corrections. The APEX assessment tools are designed to look at an agency’s readiness to take on a change process, understand the importance of safety and security to correctional operations, measure performance on the APEX Public Safety Model’s eight domains, and provide guidance for developing a performance improvement plan” (p. vii). Five chapters are contained in this publication: introduction; how to use the APEX Assessment Tools Protocol; APEX Screener; APEX Organizational Profile; and the APEX Inventory. The three tools are bundled with this publication.

Applying the APEX Tools Cover

This Session took place on November 13, 2018, 2 pm EST.

A 2016 report sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education noted that incarcerated adults with access to library services other than a law library scored higher in literacy and numeracy than incarcerated adults without access on a survey conducted by the Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies. While the study does not address why or how library services played a role in the success of incarcerated adults, it does highlight the question. In fact, the effect of library services on learning is an issue that academic libraries have attempted to address for years. In this DDLC webinar series session, representatives from the National Institute for Learning Outcomes and the Association of College Research Libraries share how their organizations have been tackling the issue.

NILOA begins by providing an introduction on current practices and future trends in assessing and documenting learning. They then uncover efforts that are unfolding to capture and document evidence of student learning outside of traditional curricular experiences. ACRL will then explain how they have been focusing on helping academic libraries and librarians demonstrate alignment with and impact on institutional outcomes.

By the end of this session, you learn how academic libraries have approached assessment in recent years and examine how some of these efforts may be adapted for use in a correctional setting.

 

Assessing Learning in Your Library [Webinar]

This guide “presents a protocol designed to produce high-quality technical assistance for the front end of the criminal justice system—the pretrial justice stage” (p. iii). Sections contained in this publication are: basic obligations of a technical assistance (TA) provider; preparation for the site visit; conducting the site visit; people who should be interviewed and areas of inquiry; after the site visit; characteristics of effective technical assistance; and logistics of acting as a consulting technical assistance provider.

Assessing Local Pretrial Justice Functions: A Handbook for Providing Technical Assistance Cover

Objectives of this three-hour videoconference include:

  • Articulating the purposes for assessment and evaluation of sex offenders and the issues and challenges inherent in each;
  • Understanding the limitations of traditional risk and needs assessment tools for sex offenders;
  • Identifying and defining the available approaches and instruments used to effectively assess and evaluate sex offenders;
  • Distinguishing between effective and ineffective risk assessment tools;
  • And identifying the complementary roles of treatment providers and supervising agents in conducting and interpreting assessments and evaluations.

Those who should participate include probation/parole line staff involved in pre-sentence investigations and supervision, first-line supervisors, managers, policymakers, community corrections administrators, parole board members, trainers, and sex offender treatment providers who work closely with community supervision agencies.

 

Assessment of Sex Offenders for Sentencing, Supervision and Treatment Cover

Expanding on Ranganathan’s five laws, we know that libraries are for use and that every library has its community (users). In order to ensure that a library is meeting the needs of its users, the library must be able to assess its services, including its collections, and understand how those are meeting the requirements of its community. This webinar will investigate the assessment activities that a library can utilize to determine the needs of its community, as well as those assessments which can help a library assure that a service is meeting its community’s desires. Specific assessments, which can be completed in any type of environment, will be discussed and examples given.

Assessment, Your Library, and Your Collections [Webinar]

Three facilities varying in size and region were audited to measure the state of the art in podular direct-supervision jails, to test how well direct supervision is performing, and to point out its strengths and challenges. Staff and inmates in facilities in Minnesota, Florida, and Massachusetts were surveyed on issues such as safety and security, effective supervision of inmates, classification, staffing and training, and design and environment.

Findings are presented in detail by facility. Floor plans are included for all units.

Audits of Podular Direct-Supervision Jails cover

This collection contains testimony regarding cost benefit and cost containment measures. Contents are:

Day 1. “Briefing on the Fiscal Costs of Corrections in the United States” by Mary Livers; “High Cost, Low Return” by Adam Gelb; “Outcome-Based Budgeting: Process and Practice” by Chris Innes; “Current State Fiscal Conditions & the Impact on Corrections” by Brian Sigritz; “Outcome-based Budgeting” by Karen Wilson; “Systems Approach to Cost Containment” by Theresa Lantz; “Cost-Effective Strategies for Meeting Policy Requirements and Legislative Mandates”--Testimony of F. Franklin Amanat and Presentation by Gary Mohr; “Reengineering Population Management”—Written Testimony by Michael Jacobson; “Projecting the Future of Corrections” by James Austin; Presentation by Ed Monahan; “Kentucky Pretrial Risk Assessment Instrument Validation” by James Austin, Roger Ocker, and Avi Bhati; “Criminal Law Reform: The First Year of HB 463” handout; and “Sheriff Stan Hilkey’s Remarks: An Evidence Based Decision Making Experience: Mesa County, Colorado.

Day 2. “Budgetary Approaches to Providing Services for Offender Health Care”—Testimony by Newton E. Kendig, and Testimony by Jim Degroot; “Reducing Medical Cost in a Correction System” by Joseph Ponte; Remarks from J. John Ashe; “Innovative Cost-Saving Strategies in Pharmaceutical Expenditures” by A. Martin Johnston; “Cost Containment: Opportunities for Continued Reform” by Bernard Warner; “Results First: Targeting Criminal Justice Resources at Programs that Work” by Gary VanLandingham; “Evidence Based Decision Making Initiative” by Madeline “Mimi” Carter; “Opportunity versus Obligations”—Testimony by Sandra Matheson and Testimony by Mindy Tarlow; and “Capability and Capacity: Understanding NIC’s Delivery of Services” by Jim Cosby.

Balancing Fiscal Challenges, Performance-Based Budgeting and Public Safety: A Compilation of Panel Testimonies cover

This video presentation will enable readers to:

  • Understand the problem of jail suicide--rates of suicide in certain groups, the decrease in jail suicide rates, what makes jails risky environments, and challenges of prevention.
  • Describe suicide risk factors, warning signs, and suicide myths that increase ones risk.
  • Discuss intervention best practices--the qualities of a suicide prevention program (a written suicide prevention policy and a culture of prevention among others), the process of suicide prevention, the use of wise correctional techniques, emergency response, and practice, practice, practice. Lessons learned from two case studies and two legal cases are also covered.

 

Basics and Beyond Cover
Basics and Beyond: Suicide Prevention in Jails

The assessment, treatment, and risk management of persons who have sexually offended is of considerable interest to a wide variety of stakeholder groups, including legislators and policymakers, court and law enforcement personnel, corrections and community supervision staff, mental health clinicians, victim advocates, and the community-at-large, among others. Many of these stakeholders have expressed concerns regarding the potential for sexual recidivism and other harms posed by offenders released to the community. As a consequence, most jurisdictions have enacted legislative frameworks to manage those risks.

The past 40 years have been witness to significant growth in our understanding of the dynamics of sexual offending, the people who engage in these behaviors and how best to assess their risk for reoffending, and what treatment and supervision interventions are most likely to result in success. In this context, success may be defined as: (1) greater community safety, and (2) safe and humane reintegration opportunities for offenders returning to the community.

This report is intended to provide a comprehensive review of best practices in the assessment, treatment, and risk management of persons who have sexually offended. 

Pages

Subscribe to National Institute of Corrections (NIC) (Washington, DC)