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National Institute of Corrections (NIC) (Washington, DC)

In order to enable correctional administrators to anticipate further improvements in objective classification, this bulletin provides a summary of current critical classification issues. Topics briefly discussed include: re-evaluation of existing prison classification systems; external and internal classification; classification systems for women inmates; identification of high risk and special management inmates; the use of classification for reentry and inmate transition programs; the impact of longer prison terms; using classification for planning purposes; and the need for on-going research and evaluation of classification practices.

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“In the following, we review the literature relevant to the study of violence and safety in women’s prison. We begin with the demographic and background characteristics of female offenders. The pathways model is then described, which emphasizes the life experiences of women that contribute to criminal behavior. This review will then describe the subcultural elements of women’s prisons that influence vulnerabilities, victimization, and violence. The types and prevalence of violence in women’s prisons, particularly sexual assault, are also summarized. A summary of the National Inmate Survey, a PREA-mandated data collection that measures inmate self-reports is provided. This review then provides a summary of recent research by the authors that examines the context of gendered violence and safety in women’s correctional facilities and results from a project that sought to validate an instrument intended to measure women’s perceptions of safety and violence” (p. 1).

This 3-hour program discusses the strengths and weaknesses of 12-step programs and how they integrate with "what works" in the correctional field. The following topics are addressed:

  • Enhancing communication and cooperation and supporting the appropriate use of 12-step programs;
  • Recognizing the benefits of 12-step programs throughout the criminal justice system;
  • Understanding how the mission of 12-step programs complements the goal of corrections;
  • Special issues with 12-step programs -- legal and mandatory participation and conflicting research and literature;
  • And implementing what has been learned.
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Targeted for criminal justice professionals who train, this curriculum demonstrates communication skills that strengthen positive interaction, evaluates the impact of individual cultural perspectives and personal beliefs on the effectiveness of interacting with others, and identifies positive and negative relationships that are impacted by cultural diversity in the work place. Section topics include creating a common understanding, what it means to be different in your organization, communicating across cultures, and development of cultural competency. The training package consists of a one volume, loose-leaf manual and a videotape that depicts numerous vignettes of interactions between people of different ethnic backgrounds. This thirty-six-hour course was delivered to trainers of the Missouri Department of Corrections Central Training Academy, St. Louis, Missouri, June 1-5, 1992.

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“Culture, including beliefs, assumptions, values, norms, and practices in an organization, determines the success of an organization’s performance and change efforts. This book helps illuminate the role culture plays in an organization that is striving for higher performance ... Knowledge of culture enables an organization to proceed along the path to successful change. The APEX Change Management Model provides a process and map for organizational change based in research and best practices; it engages the human component of the organization to ensure success” (p. 85). Eight chapters follow an introduction to Achieving Performance Excellence (APEX): introduction; organizational culture and change; introduction to change management; APEX Change Management Model; additional elements of successful change management; communications planning during change; change management principles and practices in action—Prison Rape Elimination Act (PREA); and changing culture during challenging times.

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“Investigating Allegations of Staff Sexual Misconduct with Offenders is a 36-hour educational program that addresses the complex issues in investigations of staff on offender sexual abuse in correctional settings …

The objectives of the training are to ensure that participants are able to: 1. Review the Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (PREA) and identify its impact on investigations of staff sexual misconduct with persons under correctional supervision; 2. Understand a comprehensive approach to addressing and investigating allegations of staff sexual misconduct with offenders- - policy, training and operational practices; 3. Understand legal and investigative implications and strategies to responding to staff sexual misconduct with offenders; 4. Understand the role of the prosecutor and review the legal tools for prosecuting staff sexual misconduct with offenders–their content, importance and relevance to investigations; [and] 5. Demonstrate and model how integrated relationships between police, prosecutors, investigators, and correctional personnel can help to ensure successful investigations and convictions of staff sexual misconduct with persons under correctional supervision” (p. 11-12).

Sections contained in this curriculum are: introduction; training agenda; teaching tips; welcome, introduction, and pre-test; lesson plans—Module 1 Training Objectives, Module 2 The Prison Rape Elimination Act update and overview, Module 3 State Laws and Investigations, Module 4 Agency Culture, Module 5 Action Planning, Module 6 Training for Investigators in a Correctional Setting, Module 7 Investigative Policy, Module 8 Operational Practices, Module 9 Investigative Techniques, Module 10 DNA and Medical Health Care, Module 11 Victimization and Mental Health Care, Module 12 Media Strategies, Module 13 Role of Prosecutors in Cases of Staff Sexual Misconduct, Module 14 Human Resource Issues in Investigation of Staff, and Module 15 Legal Liability and Investigations; wrap up; and an appendix including a sample pre-/post-test and a sample training evaluation.

Curriculum: Investigating Allegations of Staff Sexual Misconduct with Offenders: Facilitator’s Guide [Lesson Plans] Cover

Recent successful juvenile justice and juvenile detention reforms have resulted in better and more meaningful public policy on the use of custody facilities and have triggered significant reductions in juvenile detention and corrections populations. However, a secondary—and perhaps unintended—consequence has been a parallel reduction in the resources available to continue providing much needed training and technical assistance to facilities that still must confine the most troublesome youth. As history continues to show, juvenile detention and corrections remain the “forgotten” elements of the juvenile justice system. We now must add adult facilities that are responsible for the care and custody of youthful offenders to this list of isolated elements …

"The purpose of the Desktop Guide is to provide practitioners—line staff, supervisors, and administrators—along the various points on the youth-custody continuum with an operational resource that describes promising and effective practices that are rooted in theory and tested by research. Accordingly, the Desktop Guide will serve as a core resource for staff development and training as well as for academic course work …

"The Desktop Guide has two parts. Part I: Principles and Concepts explores the background principles, concepts, and knowledge at the core of juvenile justice and services for youth in confinement. Part II: Daily Practice identifies what is quality practice, including the skills needed to effectively serve youth in confinement."

Part I: Principles and Concepts contains: Chapter 1: Historical Perspective, by Michele Deitch, J.D., M.Sc., in partnership with a number of her students at the Lyndon B. Johnson School of Public Affairs, University of Texas, Austin; Chapter 2: Types of Facilities, by Pam Clark, MSM, LSW, CYC-P; Chapter 3: Physical Plant Design and Operations, by Jim Moeser; Chapter 4: Developing and Maintaining a Professional Workforce, by Pam Clark; Chapter 5: Rights and Responsibilities, by Michael Umpierre, Esq.; Chapter 6: Adolescent Development, by Rodney Erwin, MD; and Chapter 7: Emerging Issues, by Charles Kehoe.

Part II: Daily Practice contains: Chapter 8: Management and Facility Administration, by Anne M. Nelsen, MSW, MPA; Chapter 9: Admission and Intake, by Anne Nelsen; Chapter 10: Effective Programs and Services, by Wayne Liddell in collaboration with Kathy Starkovich, M.S., and Pam Clark; Chapter 11: Mental Health, by Lisa Boesky, MD; Chapter 12: Healthcare, by Michelle Staples-Horne, MD, MS, MPH, CCHP; Chapter 13: Education, by Randall W.Farmer, M.Ed., in collaboration with Carol Cramer Brooks; Chapter 14: Behavior Management, by Michele Deitch; Chapter 15: Service and Treatment Plans, by Dr. Nelson Griffis, Ph.D., LMSW, in collaboration with Jennifer Sloan, MSM, Wayne R. Liddell, and James Moeser; Chapter 16: Behavior Observation, Recording, and Report Writing, by Anne Nelsen; Chapter 17: Quality Assurance, by Kelly Dedel. Ph.D.; Chapter 18: Transition Planning and Reentry, by Joyce Burrell; and Chapter 19: Challenging and Vulnerable Populations, by a panel of experts and professionals.

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Contents: Part 1: The Manager's Role--Part 2: The Trainer's Role.

Developing and Managing Part-time Trainers, Pts. 1 and 2 Cover

A report which highlights the results of two cooperative agreements from the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) addressing the critical need for gender-specific objective classification systems is presented.  Following an executive summary are six chapters: introduction; classification issues for women offenders--the literature; NIC Prisons Division--women's classification initiatives (e.g., National Assessment of Current Practices for Classifying Women Offenders and Working With Correctional Agencies to Improve Classification for Women Offenders); building blocks to effective classification of women offenders; addressing classification issues that require systemic change; and future steps.  This report also has two appendixes: descriptions of seven states women's classification initiatives (Colorado, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Nebraska, West Virginia, and Wisconsin); and sample initial and reclassification instruments developed by Colorado and Idaho.

Developing Gender-Specific Classification Systems for Women Offenders Cover

This guide provides jail administrators the necessary information they need to effectively perform their jobs. Chapters comprising this publication are: introduction; the jail administrator’s leadership role; recruiting, hiring, and promoting staff; training staff; supervising staff; determining the number of inmates one officer can supervise effectively; rotating housing unit staff assignments; ensuring that officers interact with inmates; addressing the isolation of the housing unit officer; decisionmaking using the principles of direct supervision; assessing direct supervision operations and outcomes; annotated principles of direct supervision; and strategies for managing a direct supervision housing unit.

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