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National Institute of Corrections (NIC) (Washington DC)

This newsletter provides current information from the National Institute of Corrections Large Jail Network. Sections cover: Network's mission statement and goals; William Collins, attorney; James Austin, Ph.D.; Carol Flaherty-Zonis; Fred C. Osher, M.D.; "Improving Collaboration Between Corrections & Mental Health Systems"; mentor reminder; national study on suicides; Seth Prins; and "Reflecting on 15 Years of the Large Jail Network" by David Parrish and Art Wallenstein.

Winter 2007 Newsletter for NIC's Large Jail Network Cover

This training program presents strategies for making women offender workplace development programs more responsive to their clients. Topics include:

  • Emerging evidence-based gender responsive practices
  • Information strategies and case management models
  • Career theories and assessment tools
  • Collaborative relationships that support effective reentry
  • How a history of criminal convictions impacts job search efforts
  • Women Offender Case Management Model (WOCMM)
  • Strengths and needs of female offenders
  • Motivational interviewing & relational language
  • Transitional and social learning theories
  • What is in it for the system and staff
  • Pains of imprisonment
  • Assessment classification and gender responsive tools
  • Examples of best practices
  • And more.
Women and Work: Gender Responsivity and Workforce Development Cover

The authors examine issues related to classification of female jail inmates by profiling the female inmate population and discussing problems associated with using a single classification system for both male and female inmates or a gender-neutral system. This document also provides guidelines for designing a classification system specifically for women.

Women in Jail: Classification Issues Cover

Webinar held May 2, 2018

Blythe Balistrieri discusses the ways in which the general correctional library and law libraries can partner, the challenges correctional librarians must negotiate daily, and how to streamline correctional library operations. Her presentation covers some of the history of correctional libraries, challenges that these libraries can face, and how librarians can work to alleviate some of them. Professor Balestrieri listed five actions that correctional library staff can take to combat some of their challenges: Advocacy, Communication, Education, Training and Team Building. Makes reference to court cases Bounds v. Smith, Thornburgh v. Abbot, Lewis v. Casey.

This Guide provides a comprehensive overview of available information on victims' rights and services. It is informed by the foundational work of many advocates, academics and community corrections professionals. While the Guide will outline specific tools and resources to inform your work, it is worth noting that there is no one size fits all approach that will work across all scenarios. There may be information in the Guide that will require you to self-reflect on your practice as it relates to the needs of victims, however, you are the best judge on how and when to use this resource.

The Guide is intended to: Develop your knowledge and expertise in working with victims, advocates and related service providers within the boundaries of your role as a Probation and Parole Officer (PPO); Inform professional development and staff training; Build capacity of PPO supervisors to coach and guide decision making related to victims' rights and needs; and Support presentations to other criminal justice system professionals about the intersection of PPO roles and victims' rights and needs.

Sections comprising this guide are: Introduction; Community Corrections and Crime Victims; Victims' Rights; Working with Victims of Crime; Building Partnerships; and Tools and Materials. A Glossary is also provided.

Working with Victims of Crime Cover

"It has been estimated that nearly 250,000 youth under age 18 end up in the adult criminal justice system every year. However, little attention has been directed to how adult corrections systems are managing the youth offenders that end up in jails, prisons and under community supervision. To address this information gap, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) convened three dozen juvenile justice and adult corrections experts on June 18th, 2010, to consider some of the known issues, impacts and opportunities that face corrections systems as they work to safely and effectively rehabilitate thousands of youth offenders in the nations' jails, prisons, probation and parole systems. This monograph presents the key findings identified during this convening of experts." Six sections comprise this publication: executive summary; what is known about the issue of juveniles in the adult corrections systems, and where there are gaps in data collection and information; what the issues, impacts and options are facing public safety systems when youth are awaiting trial on adult charges; when youth are convicted, and committed to the adult system; when youth who convicted in adult court are on probation or parole; and conclusion--corrections and the entire public safety system needs to focus on the successful strategies to curb delinquency, and positive youth development. The "Summary of Options for Federal, State, and Local Policymakers to Consider" is appended.

You're An Adult Now Cover

If you or your agency wants or needs information about improving or creating and implementing a new reentry program, then attending this virtual conference is a must. “On June 12, 2013, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) will launch its first-ever virtual conference, “Cuff Key to Door Key: A Systems Approach to Reentry.” Topics covered during the conference will include mental health, sentencing, a review of successful reentry programs, Thinking for a Change (T4C), and a look at the challenges of reentry and transforming corrections culture. Edward Latessa, the interim dean and professor at the College of Education, Criminal Justice and Human Services at the University of Cincinnati, will deliver the keynote address” (p. 90). This article explains the reasoning behind the virtual conference, how to view it, and the complexities of successful reentry programming. This article is used with permission from the American Correctional Association. Any further reprinting, altering, copying, transmitting, or use in any way needs written permission from ACA.

conference image

With increased awareness of the effects of stress, adversity, and trauma on people’s lives, criminal justice professionals are considering what this means in their correctional settings. There is growing evidence of the effects of child neglect and abuse (as well as other forms of traumatic stress) on the health, mental health, and behavior of men and women residing in jails and prisons. While research and clinical experience indicate that there is a high incidence of trauma and co-occurring problems among these groups, corrections professionals struggle to provide them with effective management and services. It is particularly challenging when many institutions have staff who are affected by trauma in their personal and work lives. Organizational stress and trauma create additional challenges in the environment and culture of the workplace. Moving from trauma informed to trauma responsive to implement trauma-informed care can be challenging. The webinar speakers have extensive experience in delivering trauma informed education and services to the men and women in the custody of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation as well as other state and local agencies nationally. This webinar series guides administrators and correctional staff through the process and will provide updated information and research.

Webinar Objectives:
The primary goals of this three-part webinar series are to:

  •  Provide criminal justice, mental health, and substance use treatment professionals with up-to-date information regarding trauma-informed care within the criminal justice system.
  •  Provide information on the lifelong effects of trauma, recovery needs, and implementation of trauma-focused treatment interventions (including research findings).
  •  Provide an outline for the process of becoming a trauma-informed organization.

Each of the sessions includes discussion of content, polling and video clips, a question and answer period as well as a list of resources referenced during the presentations.  

Part 1: This session provides a series of definitions, a brief research overview, the implications of adverse childhood exposures (ACEs) and the potential for lifelong impact.  It further addresses the relationship between trauma and substance use disorders (SUD), the relationship between trauma and violence, and the complex needs of recovery.

Moderators/Speakers

  • Maureen Buell, Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections
  • Stephanie Covington, Ph.D., LCSW, Co-Director, Center for Gender and Justice
  • Nena Messina, Ph.D., Research Criminologist at UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs and President of Envisioning Justice Solutions, Inc.
image for webinar

With increased awareness of the effects of stress, adversity, and trauma on people’s lives, criminal justice professionals are considering what this means in their correctional settings. There is growing evidence of the effects of child neglect and abuse (as well as other forms of traumatic stress) on the health, mental health, and behavior of men and women residing in jails and prisons. While research and clinical experience indicate that there is a high incidence of trauma and co-occurring problems among these groups, corrections professionals struggle to provide them with effective management and services. It is particularly challenging when many institutions have staff who are affected by trauma in their personal and work lives. Organizational stress and trauma create additional challenges in the environment and culture of the workplace. Moving from trauma informed to trauma responsive to implement trauma-informed care can be challenging. The webinar speakers have extensive experience in delivering trauma informed education and services to the men and women in the custody of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation as well as other state and local agencies nationally. This webinar series guides administrators and correctional staff through the process and will provide updated information and research.

Webinar Objectives:
The primary goals of this three-part webinar series are to:

  •     Provide criminal justice, mental health, and substance use treatment professionals with up-to-date information regarding trauma-informed care within the criminal justice system.
  •     Provide information on the lifelong effects of trauma, recovery needs, and implementation of trauma-focused treatment interventions (including research findings).
  •     Provide an outline for the process of becoming a trauma-informed organization.

Each of the sessions includes discussion of content, polling and video clips, a question and answer period, as well as a list of resources referenced during the presentations.  

Part 2: This session discusses the rationale for trauma-informed treatment, the values and efficacy of trauma informed services, and related research findings.

Moderators/Speakers

  • Maureen Buell, Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections
  • Stephanie Covington, Ph.D., LCSW, Co-Director, Center for Gender and Justice
  • Nena Messina, Ph.D., Research Criminologist at UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs and President of Envisioning Justice Solutions, Inc.
image for webinar

With increased awareness of the effects of stress, adversity, and trauma on people’s lives, criminal justice professionals are considering what this means in their correctional settings. There is growing evidence of the effects of child neglect and abuse (as well as other forms of traumatic stress) on the health, mental health, and behavior of men and women residing in jails and prisons. While research and clinical experience indicate that there is a high incidence of trauma and co-occurring problems among these groups, corrections professionals struggle to provide them with effective management and services. It is particularly challenging when many institutions have staff who are affected by trauma in their personal and work lives. Organizational stress and trauma create additional challenges in the environment and culture of the workplace. Moving from trauma informed to trauma responsive to implement trauma-informed care can be challenging. The webinar speakers have extensive experience in delivering trauma informed education and services to the men and women in the custody of the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation as well as other state and local agencies nationally. This webinar series guides administrators and correctional staff through the process and will provide updated information and research.

Webinar Objectives:
The primary goals of this three-part webinar series are to:

  •     Provide criminal justice, mental health, and substance use treatment professionals with up-to-date information regarding trauma-informed care within the criminal justice system.
  •     Provide information on the lifelong effects of trauma, recovery needs, and implementation of trauma-focused treatment interventions (including research findings).
  •     Provide an outline for the process of becoming a trauma-informed organization.

Part 3: Becoming Trauma Informed and Moving to Trauma Responsive 
This session discusses trauma triggers, examples of calming and grounding strategies that can be employed within correctional settings, a brief exploration of the presence of and effects of vicarious trauma with correctional staff, and suggestions regarding self-care.

Moderators/Speakers

  •     Maureen Buell, Correctional Program Specialist, National Institute of Corrections
  •     Stephanie Covington, Ph.D., LCSW, Co-Director, Center for Gender and Justice
  •     Nena Messina, Ph.D., Research Criminologist at UCLA Integrated Substance Abuse Programs and President of Envisioning Justice Solutions, Inc.

 

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