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U.S. Dept. of Justice. Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) (Washington, DC)

“The goal of this project was to examine the effectiveness of three distinct strategies (revision of a detention index, a procedural change in review of detention decisions, and a monitoring system of detained youth) created by Maricopa County Juvenile Probation to reduce disproportionate minority contact (DMC) and the number of youth subject to detention in the County” (p. i). It appears that a combination of the three is the most effective way to reduce sentencing disparity and juvenile detention populations. In order to succeed, agencies must: clearly spell out what they intend to do and let all the staff know; continually evaluate the agency’s efforts and report those results to the staff; and be willing to change the process when it is needed.

An Impact Evaluation of Three Strategies Created to Reduce Disproportionate Minority Contact and the Detention Population: Final Report Cover

“Public safety is compromised when youth leaving out-of-home placements are not afforded necessary supportive services upon reentering their communities and are therefore at great risk to recidivate into criminal behavior” (p. 5). This report provides guidance and recommendations for achieving successful reentry services and programs. Sections following an executive summary are: introduction; characteristics of reentry youth; collateral consequences associated with out-of-home placement; essential components of youth reentry services; effective outcomes for youth reentry; federal support for reentry in the child welfare system; principles for effective youth reentry; and recommendations for federal leadership in youth reentry.

Back on Track: Supporting Youth Reentry from Out-of-Home Placement to the Community Cover

The development and implementation of an in-house leadership and management development system (within existing agency parameters) are discussed during this 30-hour course. Sections of this manual include: training program introduction; setting a context and identifying trends; trainer and training function self-assessment; strategies for getting management buy-in; establishing a design team and advisory board; identifying candidates for your program; competency development and assessment of managers; leadership development/training deliver options; designing and developing leadership training and development strategies; developing training budgets for leadership ddevelopment using cost benefit analysis; how to evaluate available resources; marketing the leadership development program; and additional resources.

Building Leadership Cover

"Using a three-phase process [during this 36-hour course] to plan, create, and evaluate reentry/continuing care systems, participant teams plan ways to help juvenile offenders from their jurisdictions successfully transition from institutional settings back into the community." Sections of this manual include: jurisdictional team action planning -- building your new reentry/continuing care reality; visualizing juvenile success in your reentry/continuing care jurisdiction; what are you currently bringing to the reentry/continuing care table?; becoming a change agent -- meeting the challenge; analyzing current practices -- discovering strengths and challenges; systems of care; and evaluation of reentry/continuing care.

Critical Elements Cover

The need for and process of retraining in an organization are discussed during this 3-hour workshop. Topics covered include: what does retraining look like in your organization?; benefits of refresher/in-service training; philosophy of adult education and its application to retraining; addressing four basic questions adults bring to training; and development of individual commitment statements.

Effective Retraining: Fun, Focused, Fresh! Cover

This 36-hour training program targets skills needed to effectively lead a juvenile corrections or detention facility. Modules contained in this manual are: creating our context for learning; the roles and functions of a juvenile facility director; exploring your leadership style; the impact of today's changing juvenile justice workforce; shaping your facility's vision, mission, values, and culture; addressing your facility's external environment; managing change; developing well being in yourself and others; and developing your individual project plan.

Executive Training for Newly Appointed Juvenile Facility Directors  Cover

“Research suggests that incarcerated youth have difficulty functioning in society as they age. This study reveals that 3 years after detention, most youth struggle in one or more life domains, and one in five youth is severely impaired [they face extreme difficulties in dealing with social, psychiatric, and academic issues from day-to-day] … Juvenile justice organizations, community groups, law enforcement, and corrections agencies must invest in targeted, comprehensive strategies to give these youth a chance to experience productive and healthy lives” (p. 3). The Child and Adolescent Functional Assessment Scale (CAFAS) was used to rate individuals on eight domains of function—school/work, home, community, behavior towards others, moods/emotions, self-harm, substance use, and rational thinking. The authors examined impairment overall, impairment within domains, differences by age, gender, and race/ethnicity, and functional impairment in males and their incarceration status. Recommendations suggested for public policy initiatives are: connect more youth with community services after detention; target services to those youth with the greatest need; and make sure long-term interventions are provided.

Functional Impairment in Delinquent Youth Cover

This publication “provides guidance for implementing an FDC [Family Drug Court], including the development of FDC partnerships and a common vocabulary for describing FDC components, with a focus on improving services to families who are involved with the child welfare system and are affected by substance use disorders. The authors hope that this document will help jurisdictions select and improve practices and, ultimately, outcomes for children and families” (p. 2). The recommendations made are: create a shared mission and vision; develop interagency partnerships; create effective communication protocols for sharing information; ensure cross-system knowledge; develop an early identification and assessment process; address the needs of parents; address the needs of children; garner community support; implement funding and sustainability strategies; and evaluate shared outcomes to ensure accountability. Appendixes provide: description of an arrangement for a multi-disciplinary or collaborative structure; a facilitator’s guide with sample tools and exercises that will help organizations in the collaborative process; and the evidence for the effective strategies for each recommendation.

Guidance to States: Recommendations for Developing Family Drug Court Guidelines Cover

"The purpose of this resource is to improve outcomes when interacting with adolescent girls by providing some reasons why girls often behave differently from boys, and tips on how to approach situations involving girls in a way that will lead to the best possible outcome for them and ensure public safety" (p. 1). Sections discuss: the reasons for focusing on girls; how this resource will help you; importance for law enforcement; alternatives to arrest and detention'the benefits for girls; four things you need to know about adolescent girls; ten tips on how to respond effectively to situations involving adolescent girls; continuum of girls' gang involvement; and alternatives to arrest'police-community collaboration.

Improving Law Enforcement Responses to Adolescent Girls Cover

"As an alternative to traditional juvenile courts, juvenile drug courts attempt to provide substance abuse treatment, sanctions, and incentives to rehabilitate nonviolent drug-involved youth, empower families to support them in this process, and prevent recidivism. The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) sponsored a multisite study of juvenile drug courts to examine the ability of these courts to reduce recidivism and improve youth’s social functioning, and to determine whether these programs use evidence-based practices in their treatment services. This bulletin provides an overview of the findings" (p. 1). The results from this multi-site study does not support the efficacy of juvenile drug courts. In fact, juveniles who were drug court participants had higher recidivism rates than youth on probation. Based on the process evaluation, recommendations are provided for improving juvenile drug courts.

Juvenile Drug Courts: A Process, Outcome, and Impact Evaluation cover

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