U.S. Department of Justice

Thinking for a Change

Thinking for a Change 4.0 (T4C) is an integrated cognitive behavioral change program authored by Jack Bush, Ph.D., Barry Glick, Ph.D., and Juliana Taymans, Ph.D., under a cooperative agreement with the National Institute of Corrections (NIC). T4C incorporates research from cognitive restructuring theory, social skills development, and the learning and use of problem solving skills.

T4C is comprised of 25 lessons that build upon each other, and contains appendices that can be used to craft an aftercare program to meet ongoing cognitive behavioral needs of your group. Not all lessons can be completed in one session, so a typical delivery cycle may take 30 sessions. Sessions should last between one and two hours. Ideally, the curriculum is delivered two times per week, with a minimum recommended dosage of once per week and a maximum of three times per week. Participants must be granted time to complete mandatory homework between each lesson.

The program is designed to be provided to justice-involved adults and youth, males and females. It is intended for groups of eight to twelve and should be delivered only by trained facilitators. Due to its integrated structure, T4C is a closed group, meaning members need to start at the beginning of a cycle, and may not join the group mid-stream (lesson five is a logical cut-off point for new group members).

T4C is provided by corrections professionals in prisons, jails, detention centers, community corrections, probation, and parole settings. The National Institute of Corrections has trained more than 10,000 individuals as T4C group facilitators, and more than 500 trainers who can train additional staff to facilitate the program with justice-involved clients.

T4C 4.0 represents a significant evolution in the curriculum, both in content and use. It is the most sincere hope of NIC and the authors that the changes enable you and your agency to better serve your clients. Correctional agencies can consider Thinking for a Change as one option in a continuum of interventions to address the cognitive, social, and emotional needs of their client populations.

Recommended Reading

Date Title Type
2016
Document 032650
Thinking for a Change 4.0
By Jack Bush, Ph.D., Barry Glick, Ph.D., and Juliana Taymans, Ph.D.. National Institute of Corrections (Washington, DC).
Thinking for a Change 4.0 (T4C) is an integrated cognitive behavioral change program authored by Jack Bush, Ph.D., Barry Glick, Ph.D., and Juliana Taymans, Ph.D., under a cooperative agreement with the National Institute of Corrections (NIC). T4C incorporates research from cognitive restructuring theory, social skills development, and the learning and use of problem solving skills. T4C is comprised of 25 lessons that build upon each other, and contains appendices that can be used to craft an ... Read More
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Related Resources

Date Title Type
2009
Document 024463
Evaluation of Selected Institutional Offender Treatment Programs for the Pennsylvania Department of Corrections: Executive Summary [and] Final Report
By Latessa, Edward J.; Smith, Paula; Schweitzer, Myrinda; Lovins, Lori. Pennsylvania Commission on Crime and Delinquency (PCCD) (Harrisburg, PA). University of Cincinnati. School of Criminal Justice (Cincinnati, OH).
This summary will give you a good look at one agencies verification of its programs’ ability to produce evidence-based outcomes. Five programs were “assessed to identify the effectiveness of each at providing evidence-based services”--Thinking for a Change, Batterer’s Intervention, Violence Prevention, and two sex offense specific programs (p.1). These programs were evaluated with the Evidence-Based Correctional Program Checklist (CPC) and the Evidence-Based Program Checklist--Group Assessment (... Read More
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6 pages + 322 pages
2007
Document 021657
Cognitive-Behavioral Treatment: A Review and Discussion for Corrections Professionals
By Milkman, Harvey; Wanberg, Kenneth. National Institute of Corrections (Washington, DC).
Detailed information regarding the use and benefits of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) in prisons and jails is provided. Chapters comprising this guide address: the increasing need for effective treatment services; what cognitive-behavioral therapy is; prominent CBT programs for offenders; measuring the effectiveness of rehabilitation programs; evaluating specific CBT curricula; and "real world" program applications.... Read More
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78 p.
2002
Document 018190
Evaluation of the Efficacy of a Cognitive Behavioral Program for Offenders on Probation: Thinking for a Change
By Golden, Lori.
The effectiveness of "Thinking for a Change" -- a cognitive behavioral program for adult probationers -- is investigated. Following an abstract, this dissertation contains these chapters: introduction; literature review; study purpose and major aims; method; results; and discussion. While "results for changes and improvements in criminal sentiments found in the present study [are] disappointing and counter to expectation," there are significant positive changes in social skills and social probl... Read More
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155 p.

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