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One way to unwind mass incarceration without compromising public safety is to use risk assessment instruments in sentencing and corrections. Although these instruments figure prominently in current reforms, critics argue that benefits in crime control will be offset by an adverse effect on racial minorities … we examine the relationships among race, risk assessment (the Post Conviction Risk Assessment [PCRA]), and future arrest.

Risk, Race, & Recidivism Cover

act.tv YouTube Video (4:23 minutes)

Systemic racism affects every area of life in the US. From incarceration rates to predatory loans, and trying to solve these problems requires changes in major parts of our system. Here's a closer look at what systemic racism is, and how we can solve it.

“Scholars are beginning to analyze the relative contributions of changes in crime rates, criminal justice policies, economics, and demographics to the slowing growth rate of the prison system, but one area that has gone largely unexplored is the impact of such changes on racial disparities in imprisonment. As is well known, black/white disparities in the use of incarceration have been profound for quite some time. Since the 1980s a series of analyses have documented these trends at the national level as well as examining variation in disparity among the states. As prison populations fluctuate, though, the relative rate of incarceration among racial groups may or may not reflect prevailing patterns. Further, as the prospect of a declining prison population has now become a distinct possibility for the next decade, it will become increasingly important to monitor whether reduced incarceration is experienced in similar ways across racial/ethnic groups” (p. 1). This report is an initial look at whether this trend of decreasing prison populations is reflected in the numbers of minority women being incarcerated. Sections of this report cover: slowing growth in incarceration; race and gender disparity in incarceration; changing racial composition of women’s incarceration—analyzing changes, changes in offending, prison population by offense, and changing socioeconomics; conclusion; and recommendations to address racial disparities.

The Changing Racial Dynamics Cover

African Americans are incarcerated in state prisons across the country at more than five times the rate of whites, and at least ten times the rate in five states. This report documents the rates of incarceration for whites, African Americans, and Hispanics in each state, identifies three contributors to racial and ethnic disparities in imprisonment, and provides recommendations for reform.

African Americans are incarcerated in state prisons across the country at more than five times the rate of whites, and at least ten times the rate in five states. This report documents the rates of incarceration for whites, African Americans, and Hispanics in each state, identifies three contributors to racial and ethnic disparities in imprisonment, and provides recommendations for reform.

A prominent life scientist recently declared that the Higgs boson particle, the Internet, and implicit bias are the three most important discoveries of the past half-century. In President Obama’s commencement address at Howard University last year, Obama stated: “And we knew . . . that even the good cops with the best of intentions—including, by the way, African-American police officers—might have unconscious biases, as we all do.” Why has implicit racial bias worked its way into a presidential address? More importantly, after focusing so long on explicit biases, what do we need to know and do about the pervasive problem of implicit racial bias in the courtroom?

In recent years, racial disparities in imprisonment have decreased. BJS reports have drawn attention to the trend, showing that since the mid-2000s, black and Hispanic incarceration rates have fallen faster than those for whites. These changes also have been noted by media, by advocacy organizations such as The Sentencing Project, and by the National Research Council. 

  • This report updates and advances earlier presentations of data on disparities by examining four questions:
  • What are the national-level trends in disparity in probation, parole, jail, and prison populations?
  • Are there crime-specific changes in disparity in imprisonment rates?
  • Are there differences in disparity by race and sex?
  • How have changes in reported offending rates and decisions at the key stages of criminal justice case processing affected black and white imprisonment rates?

The figures and tables that follow present data on these questions. The report describes and analyzes trends in disparity, imprisonment, and criminal justice processing, but the effects of broader social, economic, cultural or political factors on disparity in the criminal justice system are beyond its scope.

Unconscious bias can affect our decisions in all areas of life, but especially in the workplace. We explore the different types of bias, and how to reduce their impact

We may try to be as objective as possible when making important decisions, especially when these relate to work. However, as human beings, we are all subject to unconscious bias (also known as implicit bias) in one way or another, but the more we are aware of this, the more we can mitigate it. In this article, we’ll define unconscious bias, explore the eight types of bias that might be affecting your decisions, and offer suggestions for how to mitigate bias in the workplace.

In this resource from Envato Tuts, the author delves into the important topic of unconscious bias. You’ll learn what unconscious bias is, why it’s important, and what you can do to overcome your own biases (and help your employees do the same).

Through work to bring materials from women's studies into the rest of the curriculum, I have often noticed men's unwillingness to grant that they are overprivileged, even though they may grant that women are disadvantaged. They may say they will work to women's statues, in the society, the university, or the curriculum, but they can't or won't support the idea of lessening men's. Denials that amount to taboos surround the subject of advantages that men gain from women's disadvantages. These denials protect male privilege from being fully acknowledged, lessened, or ended.

When was the last time you had your eyes examined? Just as the health of our vision is maintained through regular eye exams, the way in which we see the world is maintained through self-awareness and broadening our perspectives. In the midst of quarantines, telework, and increased isolation from both friends and colleagues, we are also living through a time of social unrest. For many people, this time in history has brought new insights into the criminal justice system and interaction across cultures and life experiences.

If you are interested in improving your cultural “eye sight,” this one-hour interactive webinar sponsored by the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) is for you! Our vision for how we view and perceive others is impacted by our individual beliefs, values, and past experiences. In this webinar, we’ll explore preconceptions and techniques that can be used to understand how other people see the world. By gaining insight into your own personal filters, you will be able to engage in difficult conversations and begin to develop a greater sense of awareness and empathy that starts with YOU.

Originally broadcast on August 20, 2020.
This is part one in a four part series.

Take Aways:
Prepare to learn how to develop your H.U.E.:
H elp with cultural considerations toward effective communication in corrections;
U nderstand how your preconceptions and values influence your vision;
E nhance your ability to navigate shared experiences.


Speakers:
Alfranda Durr, CEO ALD & Associates LLC
Kari Heistad, CEO Cultural Coach International

Alfranda (Al) and Kari are Certified Diversity and Inclusion Practitioners with 40 plus years of combined experience conducting in-person and virtual training on a wide range of Human Resources, Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion topics. Al and Kari have partnered on a popular diversity webinar series covering a wide range of diversity topics. Combined, Al and Kari bring diverse perspectives and ways of seeing the world to their presentations.

 

What’s Your Eye Chart Saying? How Our Beliefs Filter Our Views [Webinar]

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