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This report examines "whether the principles associated with effective treatments for general offenders (Risk-Need-Responsivity: RNR) also apply to sexual offender treatment" (p. i). Sections following an abstract include: introduction; method; results according to the effects of treatment on recidivism, on adherence to RNR principles, and by year and adherence to RNR principles; and discussion about the implications for treatment providers and for researchers. The largest reductions in recidivism are experienced by programs utilizing RNR.

A Meta-Analysis of the Effectiveness of Treatment for Sexual Offenders:  Risk, Need, and Responsivity Cover

Literature regarding emotional intelligence (E.I.) is reviewed. Sections following an executive summary are: introduction; E.I. models -- Salovey and Mayer's Ability Model, Bar-On, Goleman's Model, Levels of Emotional Awareness Scale (LEAS), and the Self-Report Emotional Intelligence Test (SREIT); comparing E.I. models; emotional intelligence and related constructs; E.I. in applied settings; E.I. and the Correctional Service of Canada; controversies, limitations; and directions for future research; and conclusions. Also provided is a glossary of statistical terms.

A Review of the Emotional Intelligence Literature and Implications for Corrections Cover

This is an excellent document that provides information about how correctional facilities provide condoms within their walls. "Five cities or counties have condom distribution programs in their jails: Los Angeles, New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Washington DC, and two states, Vermont and Mississippi, have condom distribution programs in their prisons" (p. 1). Also included is information gotten from the Correctional Service of Canada (CSC) about their issuance of condoms.

Condom Distribution in U.S. Correctional Facilities and Canada Cover

“The purpose of this report is to provide an understanding of intimate partner violence risk assessment tools and of the issues that assessors should consider when choosing an assessment instrument” (p. 1). It is an excellent resource for individuals looking for an introduction to the process of assessing the risk of another violent encounter by an intimate partner. The beginning of this report provides a clear description of what risk assessment and intimate partner violence are. This is followed by an explanation of how a risk assessment tool is used following a violent attack by an intimate partner. The majority of this publication is taken up by a discussion of: the types of intimate partner violence risk assessment instruments based on either unstructured clinical decision making, structured clinical judgment, actuarial approaches or other approaches involving the consultation of the victim or the use of general risk assessment tool; factors to consider when choosing a risk assessment too; and the strengths and weaknesses of these tools. An appendix presents a very nice overview of the various tools according to: structured clinical judgment tools—the Spousal Assault Risk Assessment Guide (SARA), the Domestic Violence Screening Inventory (DVSI), and the Danger Assessment (DA); actuarial tools—the Ontario Domestic Assault Risk Assessment (ODARA), and the Domestic Violence Risk Appraisal Guise (DVRAG); and risk assessment tools for general and violent offending—the Violence Risk Appraisal Guide (VRAG), and the Level of Service Inventory-Revised (LSI-R).

Intimate Partner Violence Cover

The application of the risk-need-responsivity (RNR) model of offender rehabilitation to one-on-one supervision of offenders placed under probation is examined. This RNR-based training program is called the Strategic Training Initiative in Community Supervision (STICS). Sections of this report include: abstract; the RNR model of offender rehabilitation; the present study; method; results for the success of random assignment, length and content of session discussions, quality of probation officers’ skills and intervention techniques, recidivism, and clinical support; and discussion. “The results showed that the trained probation officers evidenced more of the RNR-based skills and that their clients had a lower recidivism rate” (p. ii).

The Strategic Training Initiative in Community Supervision: Risk-Need-Responsivity in the Real World Cover

This paper describes assessments of female offenders used by correctional agencies and the programs and resources provided by these agencies to meet female offenders' needs. "The two, assessments and programs/services go together. The assessments tell us what is needed and the programs address identified needs" (p. 43). Topics discussed include: gender-responsive risk assessments and the risk factors they identify; women's pathways to crime—child abuse pathway, relational pathway, and the social and human capital pathway; mental health, self-esteem and self-efficacy, and parental stress; risk factors by correctional setting—prisons, pre-release, and probation; translating the gender-specific research into practice; interventions for women offender populations; and the Gender-Informed Practices Assessment (GIPA) 12 domains.

Women's Risk Factors and New Treatments/Interventions for Addressing Them: Evidence-Based Interventions in the United States and Canada Cover
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