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Caseload management

This brief explains why “it is imperative that jurisdictions use an effective case management process that includes a strong community handoff component, particularly at the moment of release, and that ensures continuity of care between in-jail and community-based programs and services … [and] presents the Transition from Jail to Community (TJC) initiative’s approach to case planning and community handoff” (p. 1). Sections of this publication cover: the TJC initiative and model--a triage approach to interventions; the TJC case management approach; TJC case management principles; development of the case plan; referral process—inventorying available programs and services, and creating a seamless referral process; establishing continuity of care—jail “in-reach,” and consistency of programming and services; information sharing; and role of probation/community corrections.

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Anyone looking to develop an effective caseflow management plan should read this guide. It explains how to create and improve caseflow management systems. Chapters comprising this publication are: introduction to caseflow management; reasons for managing caseflow; identifying a caseflow management problem; developing a caseflow management plan—components and fundamental elements; case management and information systems—minimum standards, staff responsibilities and types of reports; implementing a caseflow management plan—changing the legal culture, reasons for resistance to caseflow management, how to effectively produce change, long-term and short-term plans, convening a team, and disseminating information; alternative dispute resolution and caseflow; and reporting requirements. Appended is an example of a model caseflow management plan.

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“The outcome evaluation [for the Women Offender Case Management Model (WOCMM) implemented in Connecticut probation] focuses on determining whether participation in the project reduces future involvement in the criminal justice system as measured by recidivism over a fixed length follow-up period. The outcome evaluation employs a comparison group to determine if participants have more positive outcomes than a group of women with similar characteristics who were not exposed to the model” (p. 1). Recidivism rates are provided for WOCMM participants and the retrospective comparison matched sample for misdemeanor arrest, misdemeanor arrest with conviction, felony arrest, felony arrest with conviction, any arrest, any arrest with conviction, and any negative outcome (including arrests as well as absconding and technical violations). It appears that WOCMM offers a positive gender-responsive impact resulting in lower recidivism rates for project participants.

Outcome Evaluation of the Women Offender Case Management Model in Connecticut Probation Cover

This meeting looked at marketing, funding, and auditing in large jail systems. Sections contained in this document include: meeting highlights; issues and strategies explored; what marketing the jail means and why do it; identifying creative marketing opportunities; strategies for demonstrating the need for adequate budget resources; identifying undiscovered or under-utilized funding resources; issues for large jail consideration; the jail auditing process -- how it supports jail operations and the effective use of resources; and future meeting issues presentation.

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The Kansas Offender Risk Reduction & Reentry Plan (KOR3P) is described. Sections comprising this article are: the basics; the key of skill development; moving risk reduction into community corrections; and collaboration for progress.

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Issue contents are: “Foreword” by Kermit Humphries; “An Overview of NIC’s Transition from Prison to the Community Initiative” by Peggy B. Burke; “Rising to the Challenge of Applying Evidence-Based Practices Across the Spectrum of a State Parole Board” by Sherry Tate and Catherine C. McVey; “Collaboration and Partnership in the Community: Advancing the Michigan Prisoner ReEntry Initiative” by Le’Ann Duran; “Providing Tools for Risk Reduction Case Management in Parole and Community Corrections” by Keven Pellant and Margie Phelps; “Improving Parole Outcomes with Performance Leadership and Data: Doing What Works” by Danny Hunter, George Braucht, and John Prevost; “Working Together to Improve Reentry: Bridging Budgets and Programs, Public and Private, Prison and the Community” by Ginger Martin; “Ensuring Successful Offender Reentry: Umatilla/Morrow County “Reach-In” Services” by Mark Royal; “Creating Better Transitions at Indiana’s Plainfield Reentry Educational Facility” by Michael Lloyd; “Gender-Responsive Reentry in Rhode Island: A Long and Winding Road” by Bree Derrick; and “Missouri Makes Its Move Toward a New Reentry Philosophy” by Julie Boehm.

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“This handbook is designed for teams of correctional and noncorrectional staff at the policy, management, and line staff levels who have been charged with implementing improvements in supervision and case management that support an overall strategy to reduce recidivism and enhance community safety through successful offender reentry” (p.1). Seven chapters are contained in this publication: an overview of the Integrated Case Management (ICM) approach; the critical challenges and strengths of the ICM approach; the nuts and bolts of the ICM approach, how it will look in practice; roles and responsibilities of staff; organizational supports, necessary resources for ICM to succeed at the case level; implementation strategy for agencies committing to ICM; and a final word on organizational and cultural change. Sample documents related to ICM are also included in the appendixes.

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The gender-responsive Women Offender Case Management Model (WOCMM) is described. This document covers: the history of the project; philosophy and core practices; process incorporating four core elements (e.g., engage and assess, enhance motivation, implement the case plan, and review progress); preparing for implementation; and evaluation.

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