Back to top

Children of inmates

“The purpose of this toolkit is to help facilitate communication and cooperation between child welfare agencies and federal prisons so that parents can stay engaged in their children’s lives” (p. 3). This toolkit contains: FAQS (frequently asked questions) for Social Workers; FAQS for Unit Teams; FAQS for Residential Reentry Centers (RRCs); Glossary of Commonly Used Terms; Child Welfare Myth Buster; Incarnation Timeline; Child Welfare Timeline; State Child Welfare Agency Contact Information; and additional resources.

Children in Foster Care with Parents in Federal Prison: A Toolkit for Child Welfare Agencies, Federal Prisons, and Residential Reentry Centers Cover

The arrest of a parent can be traumatic for many children. As noted in a comprehensive review of research on children with incarcerated parents, “The arrest and removal of a mother or father from a child’s life forces that child to confront emotional, social and economic consequences that may trigger behavior problems, poor outcomes in school and a disruption or severance of the relationship with the incarcerated parent that may persist even after the parent is released from prison.” (Hairston 2007) 

This website provides a great collection of brochures explaining incarceration to the children of inmates. Resources available to download include: “Children of Incarcerated Parents Partnership Brochure”; “Resource page for Children of Incarcerated Parents”; “Caring for Children of Incarcerated Parents”; “How to Explain Jails and Prisons”; “An Overview of Mommies and Daddies in Jail”; “Visiting Mom in Jail”; and “Visiting Dad in Jail”.

Children of Incarcerated Parents Partnership (COIPP) Resources Cover

This videoconference identifies the problems and greatest needs of incarcerated parents and caretakers with regard to their children. It specifically addresses:

  • Problems and issues that children of prisoners or former prisoners face that put the kids at risk;
  • Evidence-based and promising approaches to support these children and build on their strengths;
  • And the benefits of the criminal justice system becoming more family-friendly.

     

Children of Prisoners: Children of Promise Cover

“This issue examines the needs of children with incarcerated parents. These children are often overlooked in our schools, clinics, and social service settings. As noted in many ways throughout the article, this is not a homogeneous group – the experiences of these children are varied and changing. Responding to their needs will require attention to their unique life circumstances” (p. 2). Articles contained in this publication are: “Research Summary” by Rebecca J. Shlafer discussing the effects of parental incarceration on children and families, and creating a framework to understand the impact of parental incarceration; and “Implications for Practice and Policy” by Erica Gerrity, Ebony Ruhland, and Marc Wheeler covering evidence informed practice, and the systematic collection of accurate data.

Children with Incarcerated Parents – Considering Children’s Outcomes in the Context of Complex Family Experiences Cover

<p>"In Fall 2014, the Alameda County Children of Incarcerated Parents Partnership (ACCIPP) and the San Francisco Children of Incarcerated Parents Partnership (SFCIPP) worked in partnership with their respective Sheriffs’ Departments to survey more than 2,000 individuals incarcerated within the local county jails. The focus of the survey was to identify whom within the jails is a parent, their perceptions of how their incarceration affects their children, and what types of resources are needed for children to maintain contact and relationships with their parents during their parents’ incarceration and after release. This report presents the findings from these surveys" (p. 1).</p>

Children, Parents, and Incarceration: Descriptive Overview of Data from Alameda and San Francisco County Jails Cover

This webinar was created for the Family Connections Project. On April 16, 2020, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) presented a 1.5-hour training webinar on strategies for staff to communicate with families and children in correctional facilities.
This webinar covered four major topics:
•    Communication 101: Basic Types and Everyday Challenges
•    Points of Contact and Communication with Families in Correctional Facilities
•    Best Practices on Communication and Active Listening
•    Tips for Staff on Interacting with Families and Children in Correctional Facilities

image for webinar
Communicating with Families and Children in Correctional Facilities Webinar

This webinar is part of a series created for the Family Connections Project, the National Institute of Corrections (NIC) invites you to attend a 1.5-hour training on how to communicate with families and children in correctional facilities. Installment two of the series will provide relevant information and strategies for staff. This webinar will cover three major topics:

• Communication 101: Basic Types and Everyday Challenges
• Workplace Culture and Practices: Interacting with Families and Children in Correctional Facilities
• Applicable Practices for Staff: Interacting with Families and Children in Correctional Facilities

image for webinar
Communicating with Families and Children in Correctional Facilities: Part #2

The Community Services Division coordinates technical assistance, specialized training, and other programs related to probation, parole, and other forms of community-based corrections.

The Division also sponsors the development of publications and materials on topics of interest to community corrections practitioners, and it coordinates an interdisciplinary effort to assist jurisdictions in developing a more rational, cost-effective, and coordinated system of criminal justice sanctions and punishments.

Technical assistance related to Community Corrections is provided on issues such as caseload management, victims programs, employee safety, classification and assessment, and intermediate sanctions. The Division also provides specialized training and other programs that focus on: Executive Leadership and Development; Women Offenders; Evidence-Based Offender Interventions; Inmate Transition to Communities; Workforce Development; and Responding to Probation/Parole Violations.

Division Chief: Holly Busby

The Directory of Programs Serving Children and Families of the Incarcerated is an update of the Directory of Programs Serving Families of Adult Offenders, dated October 2001. This revised directory lists programs in the United States and around the world that offer services specifically for children and families of the incarcerated.

Pages

Subscribe to Children of inmates