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Classification research

The mental health of community correctional officers: supervising persons with serious mental illness

Few studies have investigated factors that contribute to the mental health of probation and parole officers (PPOs). Addressing the needs of supervises with serious mental illness (SMI) can create unique challenges for PPOs, which in turn may increase job-related stress and impact PPOs’ mental health. Using statewide survey data from 795 PPOs, we examine whether the number of supervises with SMI on an officer’s caseload is associated with depressive symptoms
reported by PPOs and whether this relationship is mediated by
work stress. In addition, we examine the mediating effects of role
conflict and overload in the relationship between the number of
persons with SMI on an officer’s caseload and work stress. Findings reveal that PPOs supervising more people with SMI report significantly higher levels of depressive symptoms and this relationship is mediated by work stress. Additionally, the association between the number of supervisees with SMI on an officer’s caseload and work stress is completely explained away by role conflict and role overload.These findings highlight the mental health significance for parole and probation practitioners working with persons with SMI.

Using Front End Interventions To Achieve Public Safety And Healthy Communities

A key objective of the 2017 symposium was to introduce the concept of front-end interventions as a variety of activities occurring at the pretrial stage to respond to crime, other than traditional arrest and case processing.

National Institute of Corrections Training Academy Evaluation Project, 2005-2006: Participant Demographics, Overall Evaluation of Training, and Applicability Ratings NIC Training Academy Evaluation Project, 2005-2006

Initial results from the Training Academy Evaluation Project (TAEP) assessing the training offered by the National Institute of Corrections' Academy are presented.

National Institute of Corrections Training Academy Evaluation Project, 2005-2006: Participant Evaluation of Trainers NIC Training Academy Evaluation Project, 2005-2006

Results from the Training Academy Evaluation Project (TAEP) assessing the training offered by the National Institute of Corrections' Academy are presented.

National Institute of Corrections Drug-Free Prison Zone Project: Evaluation Component for Each of Eight State Sites: Final Report

Results from projects implementing new strategies for drug interdiction within an institutional setting are presented. This compilation includes findings from final evaluation reports provided by Maryland, California, Kansas, New York, and Florida.

An Intermediate Outcome Evaluation of the Thinking for a Change Program

This evaluation of the Thinking for a Change program uses a quasi-experimental, non-random, two group pre-test post-test design.

National Institute of Corrections Training Evaluation Project, 2005-2007: Training Results, Activity Level Changes, and Implementation Results

<p>Results from the Training Evaluation Project assessing the training offered by the National Institute of Corrections are presented.</p>

National Institute of Corrections Training Evaluation Project: 2008 Evaluation Results: Satisfaction, Learning, and Action Plan Progress

<p>Results from the Training Evaluation Project assessing the training offered by the National Institute of Corrections are presented. Evaluations are made of more recent trainings instead of those conducted during the pilot phase of this project.</p>

National Institute of Corrections Training Evaluation Project: 2008 Evaluation Supplement: Learning, Application, and Action Plan Progress

<p>Results from the Training Evaluation Project assessing the training offered by the National Institute of Corrections are presented.</p>

National Institute of Corrections Training Evaluation Project: Training, Leadership, and Organizational Change: Focus on CLD and MDF

<p>The primary purpose of this bulletin is to examine leadership from a 360 degree perspective, and to assess relationships between training, leadership, and organizational change.</p>

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