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Designed specifically for correctional trainers from all areas of corrections, this twenty-four-hour seminar instructs participants in the development of a strategic action plan that will link training with agency needs. Communication styles, individual and organizational change theory, and social marketing are topics discussed. The manual contains lesson plans and a participant's guide. The seminar was held in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, September 14-16, 1993.

Bridging the Gap:  Winning Administration's Support for Training Cover

Targeted for criminal justice professionals who train, this curriculum demonstrates communication skills that strengthen positive interaction, evaluates the impact of individual cultural perspectives and personal beliefs on the effectiveness of interacting with others, and identifies positive and negative relationships that are impacted by cultural diversity in the work place. Section topics include creating a common understanding, what it means to be different in your organization, communicating across cultures, and development of cultural competency. The training package consists of a one volume, loose-leaf manual and a videotape that depicts numerous vignettes of interactions between people of different ethnic backgrounds. This thirty-six-hour course was delivered to trainers of the Missouri Department of Corrections Central Training Academy, St. Louis, Missouri, June 1-5, 1992.

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"Social media sites have become useful tools for the public and law enforcement entities, but criminals are also using these sites for wrongful purposes. Social media sites may be used to coordinate a criminal-related flash mob or plan a robbery, or terrorist groups may use social media sites to recruit new members and espouse their criminal intentions. Social media sites are increasingly being used to instigate or conduct criminal activity, and law enforcement personnel should understand the concept and function of these sites, as well as know how social media tools and resources can be used to prevent, mitigate, respond to, and investigate criminal activity. To ensure that information obtained from social media sites for investigative and criminal intelligence-related activity is used lawfully while also ensuring that individuals' and groups' privacy, civil rights, and civil liberties are protected, law enforcement agencies should have a social media policy (or include the use of social media sites in other information-related policies). This social media policy should communicate how information from social media sites can be utilized by law enforcement, as well as the differing levels of engagement--such as apparent/overt, discrete, or covert--with subjects when law enforcement personnel access social media sites, in addition to specifying the authorization requirements, if any, associated with each level of engagement. These levels of engagement may range from law enforcement personnel 'viewing' information that is publicly available on social media sites to the creation of an undercover profile to directly interact with an identified criminal subject online. Articulating the agency's levels of engagement and authorization requirements is critical to agency personnel's understanding of how information from social media sites can be used by law enforcement and is a key aspect of a social media policy" (p. 1-2).

Developing A Policy Cover

“The Affordable Care Act (ACA) sets the stage for a new health-oriented policy framework to address substance use and mental health disorders. By dramatically expanding and funding healthcare coverage to millions of currently uninsured people, the ACA represents a remarkable opportunity for criminal justice and drug policy reform advocates to advance efforts for policies promoting safe and healthy communities, without excessive reliance on the criminal justice solutions that have become so prevalent under the War on Drugs. This paper is intended as a starting framework for criminal justice and drug policy advocates to navigate the ACA, and to take advantage of the conceptual and practical opportunities it offers for shifting the conversation and the landscape” (p. 2). This report is divided into two parts. Part One--Basics Of The Affordable Care Act For Advocates: Insurance; Medicaid Expansion--Healthcare Insurance for Poor and Low-Income; What is Covered? Essential Health Benefits; and Healthcare Access and Coordinated Care Models Under the ACA. Part Two--Putting the ACA to Work for Criminal Justice and Drug Policy Reform: Support Expansion of Medicaid and Other Forms of Healthcare Coverage; Increase Insurance Enrollment of People Currently in the Criminal Justice System; Maintain Active Medicaid Enrollment During Periods of Incarceration; Expand Use of Alternatives to Incarceration; Push for Use of Pre-Booking Diversion Programs (i.e. Front-End Diversion); Promote Changes in the Care Delivery System to Improve Outcomes for People Who Use Drugs; and Advocate for the Decriminalization of Drug Possession and Drug Paraphernalia. Also included is an executive summary.

Healthcare Not Handcuffs: Putting the Affordable Care Act to Work for Criminal Justice and Drug Policy Reform Cover
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