Back to top

Community corrections training

Objectives of this three-hour videoconference include:

  • Articulating the purposes for assessment and evaluation of sex offenders and the issues and challenges inherent in each;
  • Understanding the limitations of traditional risk and needs assessment tools for sex offenders;
  • Identifying and defining the available approaches and instruments used to effectively assess and evaluate sex offenders;
  • Distinguishing between effective and ineffective risk assessment tools;
  • And identifying the complementary roles of treatment providers and supervising agents in conducting and interpreting assessments and evaluations.

Those who should participate include probation/parole line staff involved in pre-sentence investigations and supervision, first-line supervisors, managers, policymakers, community corrections administrators, parole board members, trainers, and sex offender treatment providers who work closely with community supervision agencies.

 

Assessment of Sex Offenders for Sentencing, Supervision and Treatment Cover

"The Evidence-based Practice Skills Assessment (EBPSA) is a self-report measurement tool designed to gauge the extent to which correctional staff demonstrate the skills necessary to successfully implement Evidence-based Practices (EBP)” (p. 5). The EBPSA guide summarizes how using the EBPSA can enhance an organization’s ability to become a more effective evidence-based organization. A brief overview describes the development of the EBPSA. Additional sections address reliability analysis, scoring keys for each EBPSA form, and how to utilize the information obtained from the assessments.

Evidence-Based Practice Skills Assessment for Criminal Justice Organizations, Version 1.0 Cover

This program focuses on the changing and expanding roles of probation, parole, and community corrections officers. Probation, parole and community corrections officers have seen their roles and professional expectations change and expand over the past several years. However, their primary responsibility has remained the supervision of offenders in conjunction with effective caseload management. These changing and expanding roles and expectations, coupled with offender supervision and caseload management demands, are often overlooked when recruiting, hiring, training, developing, and retaining new and existing staff. In addition, the exodus of experienced workers to retirement and the shrinking labor pool are compromising the capability of agencies to deliver critical public safety services.

FutureForce: Building a 21st Century Community Corrections Workforce  Cover

This satellite/Internet broadcast provides information about NIC's initiative on statewide implementation of effective correctional management of offenders in the community. Panelists from the Crime and Justice Institute, Inc., and NIC described the model constructs and processes used to facilitate practical application of the effective intervention principles in the two states serving as project sites. This presentation helps correctional administrators develop plans and processes for organizational and system assessment, staff development and evaluation, program development and evaluation, and retrieval of information necessary to measure results. The panel addresses how to thoughtfully consider the selection and adoption of key tools for assessment and cognitive restructuring after a realistic implementation plan is in place. In addition to emphasizing effective intervention principles, the model highlights critical issues related to organizational development and collaboration.

Implementing Effective Correctional Management of Offenders in the Community Cover

Key staff safety training issues for community corrections agencies are discussed. This manual addresses:

  • Use-of-force continuum;
  • Crisis prevention;
  • Self defense and physical fitness;
  • Oleoresin capsicum;
  • Body protection;
  • Safety in the office;
  • Protection from disasters;
  • Arrest, search, and seizure;
  • Field work;
  • Canine considerations;
  • Scenario training;
  • And critical incidents.

Appendixes include: a model protocol for critical incident and death notification; helpful hints on personal security; residential security survey guidelines; firearms standards; and a firearms training checklist.

 

New Approaches to Staff Safety Cover

Orientation for New Pretrial Executives, 19C3001

This 32-hour program is designed to enhance leadership capacity and promote sound pretrial release practices of pretrial professionals with decision-making responsibilities. The program incorporates the National Association of Pretrial Service Agencies (NAPSA) Pretrial Release Standards with cutting-edge organizational and leadership strategies.
 
The program will provide participants with a collaborative learning environment for addressing the practical challenges facing pretrial release executives every day. In addition, the program will focus on enhancing participants’ knowledge and skills, strengthening networking among attendees and other pretrial professionals, and creating a learning and problem-solving environment through peer interaction and discussion between faculty and participants.
 
Eligibility Requirements: Pretrial release agency professionals with decision-making responsibilities and who have a minimum of one year of experience in a high-level management position.
 
 
Assurance: Please note that by applying for this program, you acknowledge that (1) you meet the eligibility requirements for the training, and (2) that your supervisor supports your application for, and attendance at, this training, if selected.
 
 
 
Enrollment deadline: 3/15/2019 8:00 AM
 

To enroll, please visit:  

NIC Learn Center > Catalog > Classroom Events 

Orientation for Probation and Parole Chief Executives, 19C4001 

NIC continues to recognize the value of orientation for new probation and parole executives. This 40-hour blended learning course focuses on presenting core competencies and their related skills and behaviors to assist new chief executives with both the immediate knowledge and the long-term skills needed in the areas of leadership, personnel, strategic planning, staff safety, collaboration, criminal justice in the 21st Century, and organizational development issues.

The blended training program consists of 3 phases:

  1. Phase 1: Assignments completed online prior to attending the classroom-based sessions
  2. Phase 2: Classroom -based sessions
  3. Phase 3: Follow- up web-ex session after classroom-based session is complete

Eligibility Requirements:

Executives in probation and parole agencies who have full responsibility for the operational aspects of community corrections agencies that supervise offenders in the community, including chief probation officers, directors of state probation departments, directors of state probation and parole departments, directors of state parole supervision, and directors of public-sector community corrections (including state, county, or local agencies).

Assurance: Please note that by applying for this program, you acknowledge that (1) you meet the eligibility requirements for the training, and (2) that your supervisor supports your application for, and attendance at, this training, if selected.

Enrollment deadline:  closed

To enroll, please visit:  

NIC Learn Center > Catalog > Classroom Events 

An introduction to restorative justice concepts, principles, and values is provided during this 32-hour distance learning program. Participants will be able to:

  • Recognize the traumatic impact of crime on victims, communities, and offenders and ways to be responsive to crime victims' needs and interests
  • Explain and evaluate the configuration, methods, and potential uses of various restorative practices
  • Identify several practical strategies for developing active partnerships within the community
  • Manage personal, interpersonal, and organizational change, and prepare strategies to address responses to change efforts
  • Develop the first stages of an action plan

Order this 2 DVD set of videos and download the Curriculum Guide using the links on the right.

 

Restorative Justice:  Principles, Practices, and Implementation Cover

Copies of training manuals for courses provided by the California Board of State and Community Standards can be found at this website. Forms and publications include: Adult Corrections Officer – Core Manual; Adult Corrections Officer – Job Analysis Report; Adult Corrections Officer – Knowledge and Skills Maps; Adult Corrections Officer – Physical Tasks Training Manual; Annual Course – Guide to Writing Objectives for Annual Course Certification; Handbook for Core - 6th Edition; Hearing Screening Guidelines for Adult Corrections Officers; Hearing Screening Guidelines for Juvenile Corrections Officers; Juvenile Corrections Officer – Core Manual; Juvenile Corrections Officer – Job Analysis Report; Juvenile Corrections Officer – Knowledge and Skills Maps; Juvenile Corrections Officer – Physical Tasks Training Manual; Policy and Procedures for Participating Departments; Policy and Procedures for Training Providers; Probation Officer – Core Manual; Probation Officer – Job Analysis Report; Selection Exam Adult Corrections Officer Candidate Orientation Booklet; Selection Exam Juvenile Corrections Officer Candidate Orientation Booklet; Selection Exam Probation Officer Candidate Orientation Booklet; and Testing in Core Courses.

Standards and Training Cover

Risk and need (RNR) assessments have been administered in the criminal justice system for decades but often have not influenced professional decision-making in intended ways. Although these assessments should improve outcomes by matching individuals to indicated services, information derived from these tools has often been ignored or has been connected to increased incarceration rates and unfair racial and ethnic disparities. For example, people classified as high risk may be more likely to be detained pretrial or to receive a jail or prison sentence, when almost no tools have been developed or validated for this purpose. Most commonly used tools were created to set community-based conditions of treatment and supervision in lieu of detention. Especially in the light of the COVID-19 pandemic and discussions around criminal justice reform, practitioners and policy makers must understand what RNR is and how it should be applied correctly to enhance both public health and public safety. This webinar seeks to define the core principles and practical application of Risk-Need-Responsivity along with strategies to create and maintain critical collaborative relationships to achieve reentry goals.

Learning Objectives: During this 90-minute webinar, participants will:

  • Understand how common fallacies and misunderstandings about RNR principles have contributed to unnecessary reliance on incarceration and links to racial and ethnic disparities
  • Learn how proper use of RNR can reduce disparities, enhance criminal justice outcomes, and contribute to effective and equitable justice reform
  • Experience a practical application of the principles in a case study of reintegrating individuals within Multnomah County, Oregon
  • Learn strategies to create and maintain collaborative relationships to achieve your jurisdiction’s reentry goals

This webinar was originally broadcast  July 21, 2021/ 11am PT / 12pm MT /1pm CT / 2pm ET for 90 minutes.

 

Speakers
Douglas B. Marlowe, J.D., Ph.D., is a senior scientific consultant for the National Association of Drug Court Professionals (NADCP) and senior science and policy advisor for Alcohol Monitoring Systems. Previously, he was the chief of science, law and policy for NADCP, the director of law and ethics research at the Treatment Research Institute, and an adjunct associate professor of psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. Dr. Marlowe has published over 175 journal articles, monographs, books, and book chapters on the topics of correctional rehabilitation, forensic psychology, and treatment of substance use disorders.

Erika Preuitt is the director of Multnomah County Department of Community Justice in Oregon, which provides adult and juvenile probation, pretrial release detention and parole and juvenile services. Ms. Preuitt has over twenty years of experience with the Department of Community Justice. Her core value is that people can change, and she is committed to evidence-based practices and community engagement and partnership. Ms. Preuitt is also the immediate past-president of the American Probation and Parole Association. She has served in several leadership roles in APPA.

Mack Jenkins’s career in the criminal justice system spanned four decades. Chief Jenkins retired as the chief probation officer for San Diego County, where he oversaw a department of more than 1,300 staff who provided supervision and services to more than 13,000 adults and 2,500 juveniles under supervision. During his career, Jenkins has developed expertise in the use of evidenced-based practices for community supervision, implemented special supervision programs for people with domestic violence and sex crime convictions, and managed reentry programs for justice-involved juveniles. He has more than 20 years of experience working in drug courts and collaborative justice programs. While chief in San Diego, he chaired both the San Diego County Community Corrections Partnership and the Juvenile justice Coordinating Council.

 

 

The Foundation of Practical Application of Risk, Need, and Responsivity in the Age of COVID-19 and Justice Reform [Webinar]

Pages

Subscribe to Community corrections training