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If you are looking for a great overview of privatization and public-private partnerships in criminal justice and corrections, then this is the place to start. “Now in its 26th year of publication, Reason Foundation's Annual Privatization Report is the world's longest running and most comprehensive report on privatization news, developments and trends” The Criminal Justice and Corrections section contains subsections covering: A. 2012 Corrections Privatization Overview; B. State and International Corrections Privatization Update; C. State and Local Correctional Healthcare Privatization Update; D. ANALYSIS: Recent Developments in the Federal Civil-Rights Liability of Federal Private Prisons; E. FOCUS: The Emergence of Social Impact Bonds: Paying for Success in Social Service Innovation; F. FOCUS: Colorado, Washington State Vote to Tax and Regulate Recreational Marijuana for Adults.

Annual Privatization Report 2013: Criminal Justice and Corrections Cover

This is a good overview of the problems inherent in private probation. Sections cover: the controversy—probation for profit; litigation against private probation companies; and performance problems reported.

Controversy, Litigation and Performance Problems Plague Private Probation Services Cover

“With the growing emphasis on reentry readiness, federal, state, and local correctional agencies have developed reentry strategies that rely to varying degrees on “halfway” residential facilities, called “residential reentry centers” (RRCs) … This report provides a framework and a set of guidelines for the structure, implementation, and evaluation of RRCs” (p. i). Sections of this report following an executive summary include: from current to best practice regarding halfway houses; residential reentry facilities in the middle; guiding principles for residential reentry centers; effectiveness of these centers; improving their performance; public contracting for services; guiding principles for performance-based contracting; and summary and recommendations.

Halfway from Prison to the Community: From Current Practice to Best Practice Cover

Contents of these proceedings are: introduction; key themes; session highlights; opening remarks; open forum; U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement 287(g) Program; contract services; media relations; workforce development; Legal Issues in Jails--2008; LJN business; final meeting agenda; participant list; and index of past LJN meeting topics.

Large Jail Network Meeting, March 2-4, 2008, Aurora, Colorado Cover

"The elderly offender is still treated as distinctly marginal and remains more or less peripheral to policy and advocacy within most correctional jurisdictions. Where innovative practices have emerged, it is typically because of the local efforts of determined correctional professionals, often in partnership with the voluntary sector. Despite their increasing numbers, elderly offenders have not yet attained visibility as a national or international policy issue in corrections" (p. 18-19). This document discusses issues impacting the managing of senior inmates and offers suggestions on how to meet those challenges. Sections address: the scope of the problem; what is causing this problem of the graying of the prisoner population; the aging prisoner population—significant consequences and possible responses; managing the health care needs of the elderly prisoner; coping and adaptation to prison life for the elderly; types of stressors for the elderly in corrections; supporting the terminally ill and dying elderly in prisons; duties regularly performed by inmate caregivers; reintegration of the elderly offender back to the community; and a framework for best practice programming for the elderly offender. Appendixes include: "'True Grit': Description of a Model Correctional Program for the Elderly Offender"; and "UNODC Recommendations: Handbook on Prisoners with Special Needs".

Managing the Elderly in Corrections Cover

This is the most comprehensive website you will find about the for-profit video visitation industry. It is essential reading for anyone considering using a for-profit video visitation system in their correctional facility. "Video technology like Skype or FaceTime can be a great way to stay together for people who are far apart. It is not the same as being there in person, but it is better than a phone call or sending a letter. Given that there are 2.2 million people who are incarcerated, often many hundreds of miles from their homes, it should be no surprise that prison and jail video visitation is quietly sweeping the nation" (p. i). This website provides access to the full report, an executive summary, and a press release. Sections of the report include: introduction; reviewing the promises and drawbacks of video visitation; video visitation reaches critical mass in 2014; why families are unhappy with the for-profit industry; what this industry is doing--major themes; broken promises from the industry; how are Securus video contracts different from other companies; possible problems with correctional and policy best practices; video visitation can be a welcome step forward—HomeWAV and Telmate systems compared to Securus and other large companies; and recommendations for the Federal Communications Commission (FCC), state regulators and legislatures, correctional officials and procurement officials, and for-profit companies . Also supplied is an incredible array of exhibits that include: Facilities with Video Visitation; Fee Breakdown; Counties with Bans on In-person Visits; various legal complaints; and copies of contracts for Securus (11 different contracts), Telmate (2), ICSolutions (1), Global Tel (1), HomeWAV (2), TurnKey (2), and Tele Coin (1).

Screening Out Family Time: The For-Profit Video Visitation Industry in Prisons and Jails Cover

This publication explains how video visitation negatively impacts the families of inmates. "While prison advocates have long anticipated the technology that would allow for video visits as a way to increase communication between incarcerated individuals, their family, and community members, it was always envisioned as a supplement to in-person visitation. The reality of incarceration is that many individuals are assigned to units in rural communities, far away from their loved ones, burdening mostly low-income families with travel and lodging expenses far beyond their means. When one’s family does not have a vehicle, lives hundreds of miles away, and simply cannot afford the trip, a visit via video would be welcomed. But advocates always envisioned a choice for families with incarcerated loved ones as to whether or not they would make those sacrifices in order to support them – a choice that should be left in the hands of those with the most stake in the matter. Video-only visitation policies strip away that choice; they are simply another outgrowth of the idea that offering services to prisoners and their families can be commercialized" (p. 2). Sections of this publication include: introduction—significant expense and skyrocketing costs, disruptions to family bonding, removal of management tool, usage difficulties due to digital divide, and privacy violations; the benefits of in-person prison and jail visitation; growing restrictions on in-person visitation at the county level; whether limiting in-person visitation will decrease violence and contraband—a case study of Travis County, Texas—once in-person visitation was eliminated disciplinary infractions and incidents, inmate-on-inmate assaults, and inmate-on-staff assaults have increased significantly; money, money, money; conclusion; and four recommendations.

Video Visitation Cover
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