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Crisis intervention

The tools, strategies, and techniques that will allow corrections staff, mental health service providers, and advocates to work together to develop and implement a crisis intervention team (CIT) are presented. CITs help reduce crisis situations, improve safety, and promote better outcomes for persons with mental illness. Participants will learn: about the core elements of a locally developed and owned CIT for managing mental illness in prisons, jails, and community corrections; how to develop collaborative partnerships and implement a CIT model that takes a team approach engaging community stakeholders, including corrections agencies, local mental health agencies, family advocacy groups, and others; and how to defend a CIT’s effectiveness in enhancing correctional staff’s knowledge and skills, aiding administrators in improved management and care for a special population, reducing liability and cost, improving community partnerships for increased access to resources and supports, and increasing safety for all. Overall, this training program focuses on building an agency’s capacity to implement a locally owned and administered CIT program and the training for that program. Sections of this manual include: crisis intervention teams—history, benefits, and successes; partnership and stakeholder development; organizational leadership and program sustainability; data collection and evaluation; planning and preparing for CIT training; and Program Development and Implementation Plan (PDIP).

Crisis Intervention Teams: A Frontline Response to Mental Illness in Corrections  Cover

This white paper is based on a series of interviews, buttressed by personal observations, of key players in several jurisdictions where law enforcement officers, Veteran Justice Outreach Specialists from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), and community-based agency representatives collaborate to implement approaches to de-escalate veterans in crisis in our communities. These programs are improving public safety. They are creating opportunities for veterans struggling to re-acclimate to civilian life. These traumatized men- and increasingly women- receive the help they need to address mental health issues, such as post-traumatic stress disorder or traumatic brain injury, related to their military service.

This is the third publication in the National Institute of Corrections justice-involved veterans compendium project. It shares the views of law enforcement programs at several locations across the country, from small towns to large cities, and highlights how each jurisdiction went about creating and implementing teams or programs to improve practices meant to serve veterans who are in crisis.

Veteran Response Teams are improving outcomes for these veterans and minimizing hostile and sometimes volatile situations for both law enforcement officers and veterans. This paper shares the views of police officers, sheriff’s deputies, corrections professionals, representatives from the VA and other community-based treatment providers, each of whom, in their own words, have stories to tell.

Presentations: “Mental Health Inmate Management—Texas Initiative” (1) “Jails and the Sandra Bland Act” by Dennis D. Wilson and (2) “How to Be a Force Multiplier” by Kelly Howell; “Heroin Epidemic—M.A.T. Model in Franklin County, Ohio” by Geoff Stobart; “Addressing Staff Wellness” by Elias Diggins, Jacob Matthews, and Sonya Gillespie-Carter; “Immigration Screening” by Clint Haggard; “Legal Updates” by Carrie L. Hill. Open forum (short discussions): Inmate Art Programs, Cell Improvements to Reduce In-Custody Suicide, Preparations for Civil Disturbances, Medical Care Vendor RFPs and Selection, Recruitment and Overtime, Restrictive Housing and Tier Time, Inmates and Yoga, Housing to Manage Gang Members, Mental Health Care for Veterans, Alternative Shifts, Canine Detection of Contraband, Background Checks for Medical Providers, COs Equipped with NARCAN, Use of Long-Range Acoustic Devices. There were updates from the NSA, NCCHC, AJA, ACA, NIC, and LJN. Included with the proceedings are the final meeting agenda, participant list, and index of meeting topics.

Proceedings of the L.J.N. Meetings Cover

“The purpose of this document is to provide readers with a description of how statewide efforts can be organized and play a role in supporting SPRs [specialized policing responses] within their borders” (p. viii). The two prevalent SPRs being Crisis Intervention Teams (CITs) and police-mental health co-responder teams. The information provided is important for anyone dealing with mentally ill offenders in the community. This report is divided into three main sections: the structure of statewide efforts—lead agency type, and staffing and resources; the objectives of statewide efforts—supporting local agencies to develop a SPR, encouraging local agencies to adhere to key SPR elements, and sustaining efforts statewide; and the future of statewide efforts. Appendixes include a CIT policy from the Hartford (CT) Police Department, and a chart and short case studies on how eight states (CO, CT, FL, GE, IL, ME, OH, and UT) coordinate SPRs.

Statewide Law Enforcement/Mental Health Efforts: Strategies to Support and Sustain Local Initiatives Cover
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