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Data analysis

This videoconference discusses issues regarding the collection, analysis, and use of information to assess an agency's programs, services, and operations and to serve as a base for policymaking. Some topics addressed include:

  • Selecting areas on which to collect information;
  • Assessing department and/or agency needs and developing appropriate responses;
  • Managing evaluation resources;
  • And developing and defending result-based budgeting.
Better Corrections Through Information Cover

Anyone who needs to gather and analyze data concerning various jail-related issues will find this manual useful. This document provides guidance on how information can fuel policy decision making. Chapters comprising this guide are: introduction; good management requires good information; information that should be collected; preparing for the data collection; how to locate and capture information; how to put it all together; how to analyze information; how to interpret information; sharing information with others; and getting the most from your information system. Appendixes include: a glossary of statistical terms for non-statisticians; annotated bibliography; manual data collection procedures and sample forms; inmate profile data collection; incident data code book sample; transport data collection; tables for determining sample size; simple random sampling; calculating the standard deviation; calculating Chi Square; and manual data display.

How to Collect and Analyze Data: A Manual for Sheriffs and Jail Administrators Cover

"This article describes the evolution of the Georgia Parole Board's business-oriented data and performance leadership model" (p. 35). Topics covered include: business is data driven, government should be, too; Georgia's data-driven TCPI (Transition From Prison to the Community Initiative) plan; computerized information systems -- essential data to support accountability measures; managing with the right data; effective reports -- easy to access, read, and understand the causal link; performance leadership -- speak mission and what works language at every opportunity; and TPCI -- how to do what works.

Improving Parole Outcomes Cover

"[I]t is sometimes difficult for stakeholders, who represent different interests in the system, to come to agreement as to key issues with respect to information sharing for individual case management. These include the purposes and value to youth of information sharing; what are the appropriate limits on sharing; and how to minimize the potential negative collateral consequences of information sharing such as self-incrimination and net widening. In addition, with respect to data collection, aggregation and sharing for law, policy and program development, stakeholders in jurisdictions often make the mistake of developing systems before identifying the key questions they want answered by the aggregated data. Similarly, with respect to program evaluation and performance measurement, stakeholders must first determine the outcomes they wish to achieve and the indicators they will use to measure progress towards those outcomes, and then take their baseline measurements. Without this preliminary legwork, jurisdictions could set up information sharing systems that do not fully meet their needs." The Models for Change Information Sharing Tool Kit – 2d Edition is "is designed to assist jurisdictions in implementing information and data sharing initiatives in support of juvenile justice reform initiatives. Three distinct levels of categories of information sharing make up the Tool Kit’s Framework": "Category One: Information Sharing for Purposes of Individual Case Planning and Decision-making"; "Category Two: Data Collection and Sharing for Law, Policy, and Program Development; and "Category Three: Data Collection and Sharing for Performance Measurement and Program Evaluation;". Each category contains these sections: federal law overview; state law; interactive scenarios—sets of questions for testing ones knowledge about information/data sharing with accompanying answer keys; principles—"a set of core principles or positive values that should undergrid all information/data collection and sharing projects"; guidelines—a step-by-step process for developing and implementing such a project including related tools that can be used in the guidelines establishment; and case studies.

Information Sharing Tool Kit – Second Edition cover

The primary focus of this meeting was data collection and the management information system (MIS). Contents include: meeting highlights; the use of data for planning, decision making, and measuring outcomes -- Parts I and II; the role of professional associations and their relationship with large jails in the 21st Century; roundtable discussion; legal issues update; future meeting issues; meeting agenda; participant list; and a copy of the "Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act of 2000" (RLUIPA).

Proceedings of Cover

This Large Jail Network meeting took place January 30-February 1, 2005, in Longmont, Colorado. Contents of these proceedings include: NICs Core Competency Model Project: Preparing Leaders in Corrections for the Future by Robert Brown; Training as a Strategic Management Tool by Tom Reid; Legal Issues and Mentally Ill Inmates by Bill Collins; Mental Health Services in Jails: Identifying Problems by Joel A. Dvoskin; Informal Announcements by David Parrish; Mental Health Issues: Open Forum Discussion by Collins and Dvoskin; Announcements by Representatives of Professional Associations; Justice and the Revolving Door: the Jacksonville Experience in Recidivism Intervention by Gordon Bass; Data Technology: Management, Sharing and Mining by Tom Merkel; Corrections into the Next Decade: The Use of Data in Modern/Urban Jails by Scott Bradstreet; Implementing Core Values and Mission Statement by Robert Hinshaw; Discussion of Topics for the Next Meeting by Richard Geaither; meeting agenda; and meeting participant list.

Proceedings of Cover

This is a must read for anyone involved in working with a jail information system (JIS). “With the increasing focus on cost efficiency and the avoidance of wasteful spending, jail administrators must under¬stand the importance of the potential data at their disposal and strategically plan for faster and more effective forms of data collection, storage, and analysis. [This guide] encourages jail administrators to consider the design and implementation of a jail management information system (MIS) that is tailored to the specific needs of their institutions, is more cost-effective, and is easier to use. The data they are able to collect, store, analyze, and apply to the correctional setting translates to more effective jail management, more realistic short- and long-term goals, the ability to track trends, a more systematic way to measure performance outcomes for the institution and its staff, and pertinent information on the offender population” (p. v). Chapters comprising this manual are: why jails need to become intelligent; measurement of jail performance and key correctional policies; data that most jails are required to collect; data uses in policy analysis and organizational management; required skills for jail information systems; planning and developing information systems; implementing information systems; and requesting proposals for information system development and selecting vendors. Appendixes cover: what drives information needs; sample of a data dashboard; overcoming the hurdles of jail information systems; case example—Contra Costa Jail, Martinez, CA; case example-- Kent County Jail, Grand Rapids, MI; evaluating your JMS system support and usability features; and “Measuring What Matters”—Kent County Correctional Facility Annual Statistical Report (http://www.accesskent.com/Sheriff/pdfs/2012_Annual_Statistical_Report.pdf).

Running an Intelligent Jail: A Guide to the Development and Use of a Jail Information System cover

“This report is designed to help collaborating organizations anticipate and address the most common challenges associated with multi-agency performance management systems” (p. 6). Individuals in agencies that are collaborating to reach the same ends can find great strategies for strengthening their bonds and reaching success. This guide includes these sections: introduction; getting started; making it work; using data to improve the initiative; and sustaining the system.

Using Data in Multi-Agency Collaborations: Guiding Performance to Ensure Accountability and Improve Programs Cover

Access is provided to three interactive dashboards from the Division of Adult Institutions (DAI) of the Wisconsin Department of Corrections—Admissions to Prison, Releases from Prison, and Prison Point-in-Time Populations. These are great examples of what your agency could do with the operational data you collect.

Wisconsin Department of Corrections Interactive Dashboards Cover
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