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The effectiveness of "Thinking for a Change" -- a cognitive behavioral program for adult probationers -- is investigated. Following an abstract, this dissertation contains these chapters: introduction; literature review; study purpose and major aims; method; results; and discussion. While "results for changes and improvements in criminal sentiments found in the present study [are] disappointing and counter to expectation," there are significant positive changes in social skills and social problem-solving (p. 90). More importantly, new criminal offense rates for group completers dropped 33%.

Evaluation of the Efficacy of a Cognitive Behavioral Program for Offenders on Probation:  Thinking for a Change Cover

Results from an evaluation of Statewide Automated Victim Information and Notification (SAVIN) programs are presented. “Automated victim notification (AVN) is often touted as an effective and efficient means for providing victims timely and accurate information of their offenders’ court events and status changes at reduced burden to the criminal justice system. AVN systems, first introduced in 1994, operate by receiving electronic data (e.g., case number, offender demographics) from participating branches of the criminal justice system, coding the data to determine what type of notification is most appropriate based on the offenders’ status change (e.g., release, transfer), and then transmitting the data to registered users using standardized language. AVN systems also allow users to proactively check offender status through a secured website or by calling into a toll-free hotline where additional information and referrals may be available” (p. i). The evaluation consisted of three phases—the landscape (prevalence) of AVN; use and experience with AVN; and considerations for practice. Several of the study’s findings include: 74% of respondents use AVN; AVN systems are found to be extremely beneficial to victims; the most common challenge is delayed or outdated notifications; and manual notifications are still being provided by the majority of AVN service providers.

Evaluation of the Statewide Automated Victim Information and Notification Program Cover

New England Journal of Medicine, v. 374 n. 13, p. 1232-1242, March 31, 2016


"Extended-release naltrexone, a sustained-release monthly injectable formulation of the full mu-opioid receptor antagonist, is effective for the prevention of relapse to opioid dependence. Data supporting its effectiveness in U.S. criminal justice populations are limited … In this trial involving criminal justice offenders, extended-release naltrexone was associated with a rate of opioid relapse that was lower than that with usual treatment. Opioid-use prevention effects waned after treatment discontinuation" (p. 1232).

Extended-Release Naltrexone to Prevent Opioid Relapse in Criminal Justice Offenders Cover

This study examines the effectiveness of correctional education for adults and for juveniles, and the challenges associated with this programming. Five chapters are contained in this report: introduction; whether correctional education for incarcerated adults is effective; a systematic review of correctional education programs for incarcerated juveniles—results for corrective reading, computer-assisted instruction, personalized and intensive instruction, other remedial instruction programs, vocational/career technical education, and GED completion; RAND Correctional Education Survey—results for correctional education programs today, funding and the impact of the 2008 recession, postsecondary education, use of technology and preparedness for implementation of the 2014 GED exam, and outcome indicators and postrelease measures of success; and conclusion and recommendations. "The results of the meta-analysis are truly encouraging. Confirming the results of previous meta-analyses—while using more (and more recent) studies and an even more rigorous approach to selecting and evaluating them than in the past—the study shows that correctional education for incarcerated adults reduces the risk of postrelease reincarceration (by 13 percentage points) and does so cost-effectively (a savings of five dollars on reincarceration costs for every dollar spent on correctional education). And when it comes to postrelease employment for adults—another outcome key to successful reentry—researchers find that correctional education may increase such employment … Overall, this study shows that the debate should no longer be about whether correctional education is effective or cost-effective but rather on where the gaps in our knowledge are and opportunities to move the field forward" (p. iii-iv).

How Effective is Correctional Education, and Where Do We Go from Here? The Results of a Comprehensive Evaluation Cover

The integration of evidence-based principles, organizational development, and collaboration is investigated. Sections of this report are: introduction; background; literature review; methodology; document review; key informant interviews; interviews with probation officers (observations of current climate); quantitative analysis of intermediate measures; and findings. “The research on evidence-based principles in Maine … suggests that this concurrent model may not be a realistic strategy given its insistence on an integrated focus on evidence-based principles, organizational development, and collaboration” (p. 30).

Implementing Evidence-Based Principles in Community Corrections: A Case Study of Successes and Challenges in Maine Cover

"This article describes the evolution of the Georgia Parole Board's business-oriented data and performance leadership model" (p. 35). Topics covered include: business is data driven, government should be, too; Georgia's data-driven TCPI (Transition From Prison to the Community Initiative) plan; computerized information systems -- essential data to support accountability measures; managing with the right data; effective reports -- easy to access, read, and understand the causal link; performance leadership -- speak mission and what works language at every opportunity; and TPCI -- how to do what works.

Improving Parole Outcomes Cover

Circumstances surrounding the untimely death of Correctional Officer Jayme Biendl at the hands of an inmate are the focus of this incident review. This report “identifies systems, policies, practices, protocol, and technology within MCC/WRS [Monroe Correctional Complex/Washington State Reformatory] which would reasonably have been connected to factors surrounding safety and security for staff and others within that compound” (p. 3). Sections following an executive summary are: pre-planning agenda; documents reviews; staff interviews; briefing and report out; team’s areas of critical review; findings and recommendations for sanitation, staff assaults, treatment/program—custody/control balance, communication and alarm, chemical agents, training enhancement, custody staffing, post orders, inmate movement/call-outs/passes, camera placement and visibility, inmate volunteers, industries and back complex inmate access for jobs/programs/movement, visibility/safety, security audit, current change process, classification review—Inmate Scherf, close custody designated, and staff accountability; and staff comments.

Incident Review of Death of Correctional Officer Jayme Biendl, January 29, 2011 Cover

The use of the Mental Health Pretrial Release Program (MHPTR) by the Orange County Jail, in order to identify those individuals with mental illness who can be safely supervised in the community prior to their trials, is discussed. Seven sections comprising this case study are: introduction; summary of initiatives; first steps -- 1999-2004; beyond the Central Receiving Center -- 2004-2006; assessing the impact of new initiatives; looking ahead -- challenges; and dimensions of collaboration. Successful completion of the MHPTR program results in a 17% reduction in costs over 18 months.

Increasing Collaboration Cover

“This guide is designed to introduce and explain the key concepts in outcome evaluation research in order to help practitioners distinguish between good and poor quality evaluation reports” (p. 3). Topics covered include: what evaluation is; the role of evaluation design; how well the evaluation is carried out; sample size appropriateness; definitions of evaluation terms; cost-benefit analysis; meta-analyses and systematic reviews; assessing the report’s quality; and “Is This a Good Quality Evaluation Report?” checklist.

Is This a Good Quality Outcome Evaluation Report? A Guide for Practitioners Cover

"As an alternative to traditional juvenile courts, juvenile drug courts attempt to provide substance abuse treatment, sanctions, and incentives to rehabilitate nonviolent drug-involved youth, empower families to support them in this process, and prevent recidivism. The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) sponsored a multisite study of juvenile drug courts to examine the ability of these courts to reduce recidivism and improve youth’s social functioning, and to determine whether these programs use evidence-based practices in their treatment services. This bulletin provides an overview of the findings" (p. 1). The results from this multi-site study does not support the efficacy of juvenile drug courts. In fact, juveniles who were drug court participants had higher recidivism rates than youth on probation. Based on the process evaluation, recommendations are provided for improving juvenile drug courts.

Juvenile Drug Courts: A Process, Outcome, and Impact Evaluation cover

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