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<p>Results from the Training Evaluation Project assessing the training offered by the National Institute of Corrections are presented. This bulletin covers “training results (progress on training objectives), activity level changes (pre- and post-training behavior), and implementation results (in the workplace)” (p.1). Participants made moderate to substantial progress in meeting training objectives, engaged in 70.4% of key training-related behaviors, and made moderate progress implementing training objectives.</p>

<p>Results from the Training Evaluation Project assessing the training offered by the National Institute of Corrections are presented. Evaluations are made of more recent trainings instead of those conducted during the pilot phase of this project. The programs are Inmate Behavior Management, Administering a Small Jail, Conducting Prison Security Audits, and How to Run a Direct Supervision Housing Unit—Training for Trainers. On a 5 point scale, participants rated satisfaction with training and trainers a 4.52 and 4.77 respectively, the learning of training-related knowledge and skills a 4.55, and progress on action plans a 3.19.</p>

<p>Results from the Training Evaluation Project assessing the training offered by the National Institute of Corrections are presented. This bulletin’s primary purpose is to update CwRC-NIC Bulletin 4 (NICIC no. 024801) results about four recent training programs not included in the pilot project findings. The programs are Inmate Behavior Management, Administering a Small Jail, Conducting Prison Security Audits, and How to Run a Direct Supervision Housing Unit—Training for Trainers. Participants reported high to very high rates of training-related learning at the end of the course; 50% over-estimated the potential application of training in their jobs; and 75% lacked estimated progress on action plans.</p>

<p>Results from the Training Evaluation Project assessing the training offered by the National Institute of Corrections are presented. “The primary purpose of this bulletin is to examine leadership from a 360 degree perspective, and to assess relationships between training, leadership, and organizational change” (p. 3). It appears Correctional Leadership Development increased transformational leadership practices while Management Development for the Future had a small effect on leadership change.</p>

The results from a study of eight risk assessments used for determining which justice-involved youth are low-, moderate-, or high-risk for future delinquency are reviewed. Sections comprising this summary are: introduction; comparison of juvenile justice risk assessment instruments by agency, risk assessment model, and effectiveness; inter-rate reliability testing; validity and equity testing; and implications for practice. Risk assessment should be a simple process that is easily understood and articulated. This study’s findings show that simple, straightforward, actuarial approaches to risk assessment can produce the strongest results (p. 5).

NCCD Compares Juvenile Justice Risk Assessment Instruments: A Summary of the OJJDP-Funded Study Cover

This website provides access to materials related to the National Institute of Justice’s Multisite Adult Drug Court Evaluation (MADCE). You should look at the information provided here If you are thinking of implementing or improving drug courts in your jurisdiction. Sections cover: description of the evaluation; research questions; data collection; and links to results from the evaluation (publications, dataset, and presentations).

NIJ’s Multisite Adult Drug Court Evaluation Cover

“NPC Research provides quality social services evaluation, policy analysis, research, and training.” This website provides information, reports, and evaluations pertaining to a wide range of project areas. Specialty Areas include child abuse and its prevention, community health, criminal justice, drug treatment courts and other problem-solving courts, early childhood and family well-being, juvenile justice, literacy, substance abuse prevention and treatment, and youth development and strengths. Publications and resources include publications, report, presentations, related links, and materials. Materials are organized according to: Drug Court Typology Interview Guide; Healthy Start; Juvenile Crime Prevention Risk and Protective Assessment; NARA; Oregon Relief Nursery; Reading for Healthy Families; Regional Action Initiative; and Youth Competency Assessment.

Reports and Publications Cover

Objective jail classification (OJC) is a process of assessing every jail inmate's custody and program needs and is considered one of the most important management tools available to jail administrators and criminal justice system planners. An effective system of inmate classification will reduce escapes and escape attempts, suicides and suicide attempts, and inmate assaults. OJC systems use locally developed and validated instruments, one at intake and another after a period of confinement, that identify the level of risk and needs presented by an inmate so that appropriate housing and program assignments can be made. The data generated through the classification process can also be used for operational, management, and planning purposes. This guide to OJC is intended for both jail administrators and other officials involved in local criminal justice system issues. It discusses key components of an OJC system, including instruments that use reliable and valid criteria, overrides by classification staff, staff training and commitment to OJC, and a housing plan that is consistent with classification outcomes. The author outlines specific aspects of system implementation, automation, monitoring, and evaluation of OJC systems. Policy implications and recommendations are also discussed.

Objective Jail Classification Systems: A Guide for Jail Administrators Cover

Results from an ongoing evaluation project on the effectiveness of offender workforce development (OWD) services are presented. “Drug and alcohol abuse and/or not continuing substance abuse treatment was identified as almost a universal barrier to post-release success” (p. 67). Those individuals that receive OWD services have a recidivism rate 33% lower than the comparison group.

Offender Workforce Development Services Makes an Impact Cover

The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention’s (OJJDP’s) Model Programs Guide (MPG) contains information about evidence-based juvenile justice and youth prevention, intervention, and reentry programs. It is a resource for practitioners and communities about what works, what is promising, and what does not work in juvenile justice, delinquency prevention, and child protection and safety. MPG uses expert study reviewers and CrimeSolutions.gov’s program review process, scoring instrument, and evidence ratings. The two sites also share a common database of juvenile-related programs. There are three evidence ratings in the MPG—effective, promising, or no effect. Points of entry are: youth programs at a glance; about the MPG; recently posted programs; resources—a huge range of literature reviews, related links, publications, glossary, FAQs, and contact MPG; MPG programs by topic; and all MPG programs. MPG program topical areas are: Child Protection, Health, and Welfare; Children Exposed to Violence and Victimization; Delinquency Prevention; Detention, Confinement, and Supervision; Juvenile and Family Courts; Law Enforcement; Populations; Schools; and Youth Offenders.

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